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Aerospace & Defense

  • November 15, 2018

    DOD Reaches $23B Deal With Lockheed For More F-35s

    The U.S. Department of Defense and Lockheed Martin Corp. have reached a preliminary deal for 255 F-35 fighter jets for the U.S. and foreign partners worth up to $22.7 billion, the largest order yet for the aircraft, the DOD has announced.

  • November 14, 2018

    S. Korean Cos. On Hook For $236M In Bid-Rigging Conspiracy

    Three South Korea-based oil refiners and logistics companies pled guilty Wednesday to rigging bids on U.S. Department of Defense fuel supply contracts, violating the Sherman Antitrust Act, and agreed to pay $236 million in criminal fines and civil damages, according to the U.S. Department of Justice.

  • November 14, 2018

    Oracle Protest Over $10B JEDI Cloud Deal Denied

    The U.S. Government Accountability Office on Wednesday denied an Oracle unit's protest over the U.S. Department of Defense's pending $10 billion Joint Enterprise Defense Infrastructure cloud computing contract, saying the DOD acted reasonably when it chose to use a single vendor for the deal.

  • November 14, 2018

    Senate Passes Coast Guard Bill With Ballast Compromise

    A bill reauthorizing the U.S. Coast Guard heads back to the House of Representatives on Wednesday after the Senate voted to pass a version of the legislation that includes a compromise over how the federal government will regulate ship ballast and discharge.

  • November 14, 2018

    Retired Navy Capt. Cops To Role In 'Fat Leonard' Bribery Case

    A retired U.S. Navy captain pled guilty Tuesday to his role in the sweeping “Fat Leonard” bribery scheme related to Navy port services contracts, as a former master chief petty officer was also sentenced to 17 months in prison for his involvement.

  • November 14, 2018

    Calif. Man Gets 9 Years For Russian Export Scheme

    A California man has been sentenced in federal court to nine years in prison for money laundering and for conspiring to violate export laws, the U.S. Department of Justice said Tuesday.

  • November 13, 2018

    GAO Urges Defense Dept. To Clarify Lowest Price Deal Criteria

    The U.S. Department of Defense needs to clarify its requirements around using the lowest price, technically acceptable contracting model, the U.S. Government Accountability Office said Tuesday, claiming the DOD wasn’t yet consistently following lawmakers’ mandates for LPTA deals.

  • November 13, 2018

    Texas Contractor CEO Didn't Rip Off NASA, Jury Says

    A Texas federal jury has delivered an acquittal in a criminal fraud case accusing the CEO of a NASA contractor of falsely representing hours worked and costs, according to the executive’s lawyer.

  • November 13, 2018

    Lebanese Residents Held On Gun Smuggling Charges

    The federal government arrested two residents of Lebanon in Seattle last week on gun smuggling charges after they tried to pack a sport utility vehicle full of firearms and ship it back to their home country.

  • November 13, 2018

    DOD Research Chief Signals More Laser Weapons Funding

    The U.S. Department of Defense will spend more on developing directed-energy weapons in coming years to make them a viable part of its missile defense plans, alongside trying to keep up with rapid developments in hypersonic weapons by U.S. rivals, the department's research chief said Tuesday.

  • November 13, 2018

    US, China Still At Odds Over Trade As G-20 Summit Looms

    As President Donald Trump and Chinese President Xi Jinping prepare for their high-stakes sitdown at next week's G-20 summit in Argentina, the two governments remain at odds over a slew of trade issues, chiefly the White House's various moves to restrict trade with China on the basis of national security.

  • November 13, 2018

    High Court Won't Touch Honeywell Retiree Benefits Battle

    The U.S. Supreme Court said Tuesday it won't hear a group of retirees' challenge to a Sixth Circuit opinion that found Honeywell International Inc. didn't owe them lifetime health care benefits.

  • November 9, 2018

    Fed. Circ.'s Bond Ruling Likely To Affect State-Level Contracts

    The Federal Circuit’s ruling that federal law required a government contractor to provide bonds prior to starting two U.S. Army construction projects will likely have nationwide ramifications, as each state’s courts consider how similar statutes apply to state contracts, lawyers said.

  • November 9, 2018

    8th Circ. Says Gov't Exempt From Army Priest Sex Abuse Suit

    The dismissal of a sexual abuse lawsuit against a U.S. Army hospital was upheld by the Eighth Circuit on Friday after it determined that the federal government is immune to claims that the hospital should have known of a priest’s history of sexual abuse allegations.

  • November 9, 2018

    Fed. Circ. Hands GE Another Win Over Jet Engine Patents

    The Federal Circuit on Friday affirmed Patent Trial and Appeal Board decisions that invalidated claims in three United Technologies Corp. patents covering aircraft engines, handing another win to General Electric Co. in the rivals’ patent fight.

  • November 9, 2018

    DOD's Chief Management Officer Steps Down

    The U.S. Department of Defense's chief management officer stepped down Friday, following two months of speculation that he was on the way out over an alleged failure to sufficiently identify cost savings, the key focus of his role.

  • November 9, 2018

    US Foreign Arms Sales Increase To $192B In 2018

    International sales of U.S. arms and defense equipment hit $192.3 billion in fiscal 2018, marking a significant leap from the previous year, the U.S. Department of State announced, suggesting that the Trump administration’s recent changes to arms export policy were behind the boost.

  • November 9, 2018

    2 Indicted In $400M Army Base Contract Kickback Scheme

    Two employees of SK Engineering & Construction Co. Ltd. stand accused of being part of a scheme to defraud the U.S. government via fraudulent subcontracts as a vehicle to conceal bribes to a public official in exchange for over $400 million in construction contracts for a U.S. Army base in South Korea, according to prosecutors in Tennessee federal court Thursday.

  • November 8, 2018

    Contractor Charged With Hiring Unqualified Army Interpreters

    A former recruiter for an interpretation services company was indicted in Maryland federal court Wednesday and accused of fraudulently hiring unqualified interpreters to work alongside the U.S. military in Afghanistan.

  • November 8, 2018

    DOD Must Plan Better For Corrosion Mitigation: GAO Report

    The effects of corrosion cost the U.S. Department of Defense billions of dollars each year, but the DOD is not properly determining the appropriate level of funding needed to address the issue, the U.S. Government Accountability Office said Thursday.

Expert Analysis

  • Opinion

    The Supreme Court Should Become Boring

    Alexander Klein

    In the aftermath of Justice Brett Kavanaugh's confirmation, the U.S. Supreme Court should decline review of the nation's most polarizing political questions unless and until the questions become time-sensitive, says Alexander Klein, head of the commercial litigation group at Barket Epstein Kearon Aldea & LoTurco LLP.

  • Is CFPB Curtailing Its Own Supervisory Authority?

    Keith Bradley

    The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau recently announced plans to stop conducting supervisory examinations for violations of the Military Lending Act. The broader implications of this decision could lead to company push back on a wide range of supervisory activity by the CPFB, says Keith Bradley of Squire Patton Boggs LLP.

  • Q&A

    Back To School: BC's Kent Greenfield Talks Corporate Law

    Kent Greenfield

    In this series featuring law school luminaries, Boston College Law School professor Kent Greenfield reflects on his corporate law theories, his legal battle with the Pentagon over free speech and gay rights, and important constitutional law issues to watch out for.

  • 10 Years Of Inaction On US-Flag Cargo Preference

    Jeff Vogel

    The 2009 National Defense Authorization Act granted the U.S. Maritime Administration increased authority to enforce the requirement that at least half of government-impelled cargoes be carried on U.S.-flag vessels. But in the intervening decade, regulatory efforts toward this goal have failed. If Congress wishes to preserve the U.S.-flag fleet, it must take further action, says Jeff Vogel of Cozen O’Connor.

  • How FIRRMA Changes The Game For Tech Cos. And Investors

    Steven Croley

    The Foreign Investment Risk Review Modernization Act, signed into law in August, will significantly alter how the Committee on Foreign Investment in the United States conducts its work. Emerging technology companies, and their prospective investors, must be mindful of whether investments are now subject to CFIUS jurisdiction, say attorneys at Latham & Watkins LLP.

  • Kavanaugh Cannot Be Compelled To Recuse Himself

    Donald Scarinci

    Whether Justice Brett Kavanaugh’s prior statements may be grounds for disqualification when it comes to judging certain cases is debatable, but there are no specific recusal guidelines for the U.S. Supreme Court. The justices themselves don’t even agree on where to draw the line when it comes to perceived political bias, says Donald Scarinci, a founding partner of Scarinci Hollenbeck LLC.

  • Knowledge Management: An Unsung Hero Of Legal Innovation

    Rob MacAdam

    As technology evolves, law firms are increasingly looking for ways to improve communication, transparency and service for their clients. Firms should put knowledge management at the core of their value proposition to create a competitive advantage, says Rob MacAdam at HighQ.

  • Opinion

    Skip The New 'Civility Courses' And Think Like A Lawyer

    Alex Dimitrief

    As we watch what passes for political discourse in our nation’s capital, it’s understandable that universities are launching programs on how to cope with ideological disputes. But our country needs fewer people who profess to be open-minded and more people who engage in and honor the conclusions of reasoned debates, says Alex Dimitrief of General Electric Co.

  • Antitrust Considerations For Government Contractors

    Peter Levitas

    Companies that engage in government contracting, particularly in the defense industry, face sector-specific antitrust compliance challenges. They must navigate carefully to manage risk in merger review, teaming agreements and personnel issues, say Peter Levitas and Francesca Pisano of Arnold & Porter.

  • Why Law Firms Should Monitor The Dark Web

    Anju Chopra

    Dark web monitoring allows law firms to see what sensitive information may have made its way onto the thriving global underground marketplace where cybercriminals buy and sell exposed data. It can also help lawyers advise clients on a wide range of legal and business matters, say Anju Chopra and Brian Lapidus of Kroll.