Aerospace & Defense

  • January 06, 2021

    Ex-Twitter Worker Accused Of Being Saudi Spy Wins Info Bid

    A California federal judge instructed the federal government Wednesday to provide additional information regarding money laundering charges filed against a former Twitter employee accused of helping the Saudi Arabian government spy on users deemed critics of the regime, finding the charging documents lacked sufficient details to establish venue.

  • January 06, 2021

    Appeals Court Remands Arbitration Question In Pemex Feud

    A Florida judge was wrong not to first decide whether two aircraft maintenance companies that sued Petróleos Mexicanos for $8 million are bound by an underlying arbitration clause before denying the Mexican state-owned energy company's arbitration bid, an appeals court ruled Wednesday.

  • January 06, 2021

    ​​​​​​​DOD Wants To Expand Contractors' Overseas Operations

    The U.S. Department of Defense proposed a rule Wednesday to expand the type of overseas operations where contractors can support the military, while also requiring contractors to screen employees' qualifications and mental and physical fitness before deployment.

  • January 06, 2021

    ViaSat Asks FCC To Investigate SpaceX For Space Pollution

    SpaceX's broadband constellation should be subject to an environmental review before the Federal Communications Commission considers granting the space company's bid to bring 3,000 satellites closer to Earth, the agency has heard.

  • January 06, 2021

    Outed Atty's 'Deficient' Brief Costs Him Appeal In $26M Suit

    An attorney who claimed a former colleague outed his sexuality to an alleged Al-Qaida combatant client lost his chance to appeal the dismissal of his $26 million lawsuit after the Seventh Circuit blasted his "woefully deficient" brief challenging the decision.

  • January 06, 2021

    NYSE Backtracks And Again Plans To Delist Chinese Stocks

    The New York Stock Exchange on Wednesday again reversed course and said it would delist shares of three Chinese telecommunications companies, marking the latest twist over the interpretation of an executive order banning U.S. investments in companies with ties to China's military.

  • January 06, 2021

    Court Scraps Small-Biz Suit Over $45M Alaska Security Deal

    A federal court scrapped claims that the U.S. Department of Homeland Security ignored a joint venture's past work to tap a rival for a $45 million security contract in Alaska, saying the record showed that the government reviewed the available information.

  • January 06, 2021

    Chinese National Who Lied About Lab Vials Gets Time Served

    A Chinese national studying with Harvard University and Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center will avoid additional jail time after a judge sentenced him to time served Wednesday for lying about laboratory vials found stashed in his suitcase as he was boarding a flight to Beijing.

  • January 06, 2021

    DC Legal World On Guard As Trump Mob Storms Capitol

    As a mob of President Donald Trump's supporters broke into the U.S. Capitol while lawmakers formalized the victory of President-elect Joe Biden, law firms and courthouses blocks away had various responses, from shutting down to amping up security to condemning the disturbance outside their windows.

  • January 06, 2021

    Coke Taps Ex-Boeing Adviser As Point Person In Tax Case

    The Coca-Cola Co. on Wednesday said it appointed a former U.S. federal judge and Boeing executive to step into a newly created role of counselor and special adviser to the company's leadership, as the Atlanta-based beverage giant faces ongoing litigation with the Internal Revenue Service.

  • January 06, 2021

    Assange Denied Bail After Avoiding Extradition To US

    Julian Assange must remain in custody until the U.S. government's potential appeal against the decision blocking his extradition to face espionage charges, a London judge has ruled, saying on Wednesday that there are "substantial grounds" to believe the WikiLeaks founder would abscond if released.

  • January 05, 2021

    Trump, Iran Trade Barbs As US Prepares For New Admin.

    U.S.-Iran relations crumbled further Tuesday, with the U.S. Treasury Department blacklisting 13 players in Iran's steel sector and announcing the seizure of $7 million in Iranian assets while Tehran renewed its call to arrest President Donald Trump.

  • January 05, 2021

    Trump Bars Dealings With WeChat Pay, 7 Other Chinese Apps

    President Donald Trump on Tuesday banned eight Chinese-owned apps, including the payment services WeChat Pay, Alipay and QQ Wallet, citing cybersecurity concerns and directing U.S. Secretary of Commerce Wilbur Ross to evaluate other applications that "may pose an unacceptable risk to the national security."

  • January 05, 2021

    FAA's New Drone Rules Only A 'Starting Point' For Businesses

    Recently finalized rules allowing drones to fly over people and at night may pave the way for increased commercial use of the technology, but such operations still face barriers stemming from property rights concerns, privacy rules and jurisdictional uncertainty.

  • January 05, 2021

    Arbitration Institution Backs High Court Discovery Petition

    The International Institute for Conflict Prevention & Resolution is backing a bid for the U.S. Supreme Court to resolve whether U.S. law allows federal courts to order discovery for private commercial arbitration abroad, arguing Tuesday that uncertainty on this "highly important issue" will prevail without its help.

  • January 05, 2021

    Commerce Renews AI Restrictions Amid Larger China Review

    The U.S. Department of Commerce on Tuesday renewed export restrictions on geospatial software that makes use of artificial intelligence for another year, extending controls that domestic manufacturers and trade groups had warned were excessively vague and could be misused.

  • January 05, 2021

    Fed. Circ. Wipes Out $8M Award In Phone Roaming IP Case

    The Federal Circuit let a Hong Kong-based hotspot company off the hook for $8.2 million in damages Tuesday after it found that the lower court wrongly found the company liable for infringing a patent covering mobile phone roaming technology.

  • January 05, 2021

    US Officials Say Government Hack 'Likely Russian In Origin'

    The U.S. government on Tuesday said Russian intelligence agents "likely" carried out a cyberespionage operation that has breached several federal agencies, in authorities' first public attribution of a sprawling attack whose scope continues to grow.

  • January 05, 2021

    NYSE Halts Plans To Delist Trio Of Chinese Telecom Cos.

    The New York Stock Exchange said late Monday it had hit the brakes on plans to delist three Chinese telecommunications companies after consulting further with regulators regarding the applicability of a U.S. trading ban affecting issuers with Chinese military ties.

  • January 05, 2021

    Fired Employee Gets 2nd Shot At Arbitration For Sex Bias Suit

    A California appeals court reversed a trial judge's decision refusing to send a sex bias and wage suit to arbitration, saying the lower court's analysis of a fired employee's arbitration pact with the cargo company didn't dig deep enough.

  • January 05, 2021

    US Faces Tough Ask To Overturn Assange Extradition Ruling

    The battle to extradite WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange to the United States to face espionage charges over the publication of secret U.S. documents is far from over after a London judge blocked the extradition on health grounds Monday. But lawyers say prosecutors will struggle to overturn the decision on appeal.

  • January 04, 2021

    Trump's Move To Sanction ICC Officials On Hold, For Now

    A New York federal judge on Monday temporarily blocked President Donald Trump's executive order that allows International Criminal Court officials to be sanctioned, finding that the regulation likely illegally restricts the speech of human rights attorneys who work with the ICC's office of the prosecutor.

  • January 04, 2021

    SolarWinds Hit With Shareholder Suit Over Nation-State Hack

    SolarWinds Corp. misled investors by failing to disclose a security vulnerability that suspected Russian-linked hackers are believed to have exploited to gain a foothold into the information technology provider's expansive roster of clients, including Microsoft Corp. and several federal government agencies, according to a proposed class action filed in Texas federal court Monday. 

  • January 04, 2021

    OFAC Fines French Bank $8.6M For Alleged Sanctions Lapses

    A French bank will pay $8.6 million to settle claims that it processed more than $2 billion in transactions through U.S. banks on behalf of sanctioned Syrian entities, the Department of the Treasury's Office of Foreign Assets Control said Monday.

  • January 04, 2021

    GAO Says Bidder Not Misled On $80M DOD Storage Deal

    The U.S. Government Accountability Office has rejected a technology services firm's protest over a nearly $80 million Pentagon contract for computer data storage, ruling in a decision released Monday that the company wasn't misled into overbidding for the deal.

Expert Analysis

  • Overcoming Immunity Of Foreign Gov't Cyberattack Sponsors

    Author Photo

    To combat the emerging threat of foreign state-sponsored cyberattacks on U.S. businesses and citizens, litigants need to creatively argue for exceptions to immunity under the Foreign Sovereign Immunities Act for foreign governments, say Jerry Goldman and Bruce Strong at Anderson Kill.

  • Lessons On Gov't Contractor Employees' Apparent Authority

    Author Photo

    The Armed Services Board of Contract Appeals' recent ruling in Aspen Consulting LLC, affirming that a government contractor employee who was unauthorized to sign contracts bound their employer, is a reminder that the government's reliance on apparent authority could bring harsh results for contractors, say Kayleigh Scalzo and Evan Sherwood at Covington.

  • How Mediators Can Help Parties Overcome Emotional Barriers

    Author Photo

    Litigants' emotions can doom the prospects for settlement during mediation, so listening with empathy and helping parties look at a case less emotionally are important tools in a mediator's kit, says Sidney Schenkier at JAMS.

  • High Court Could Expand FCA Reach In Resolving Circuit Split

    Author Photo

    If the U.S. Supreme Court grants certiorari in U.S. v. Care Alternatives and affirms the Third Circuit's position on subjective opinion as a basis for False Claims Act liability, it would provide needed clarity but also increase liability risk for myriad businesses, including those that received Paycheck Protection Program loans, say attorneys at Winston & Strawn.

  • Series

    Judging A Book: Wardlaw Reviews 'Hamilton And The Law'

    Author Photo

    Lisa Tucker's collection of essays, "Hamilton and the Law: Reading Today's Most Contentious Legal Issues Through the Hit Musical," has the seemingly incongruous effect of drawing the reader into America's formative history while also contemplating the intractable issues facing us today, including racial justice, immigration and gender equality, says Ninth Circuit Judge Kim Wardlaw.

  • Aviation Watch: Why Boeing-Airbus Trade War May End Soon

    Author Photo

    The prolonged trade war between Boeing and Airbus — and between the U.S. and the European Union — has led to economic losses on all sides, but various factors, including a less adversarial attitude from the Biden administration, could lead to a resolution soon, says Alan Hoffman, a retired attorney and aviation expert.

  • 7 Tips For Predeposition Meetings Under New Federal Rule

    Author Photo

    Attorneys can use a new predeposition meet-and-confer obligation for federal litigation — taking effect Tuesday — to better understand and narrow the topics of planned testimony, and more clearly outline the scope of any discovery disputes, says James Wagstaffe at Wagstaffe von Loewenfeldt Busch.

  • Ethics Reminders As Employees Move To Or From Gov't

    Author Photo

    Many organizations are making plans for executives to go into government jobs, or for government officials to join a private sector team, but they must understand the many ethics rules that can put a damper on just how valuable the former employee or new hire can be, say Scott Thomas and Jennifer Carrier at Blank Rome.

  • 3 Fed. Circ. IP Cases For Gov't Contractors To Watch

    Author Photo

    Nathaniel Castellano at Arnold & Porter discusses recent oral arguments at the Federal Circuit in three cases — Boeing v. Secretary of the Air Force, Bitmanagement Software v. U.S. and Harmonia Holdings v. U.S. — and the broad implications the decisions will have on government contractors and agencies dealing in proprietary data and software.

  • A Key To Helping Clients Make Better Decisions During Crisis

    Author Photo

    As the pandemic brings a variety of legal stresses for businesses, lawyers must understand the emotional dynamic of a crisis and the particular energy it produces to effectively fulfill their role as advisers, say Meredith Parfet and Aaron Solomon at Ravenyard Group.

  • Expect Major Changes In Aerospace And Defense Under Biden

    Author Photo

    President-elect Joe Biden is expected to significantly shift aerospace and defense industry priorities, revoke certain Trump administration government contractor policies, strengthen "Buy American" requirements, and increase use of defense and NASA budgetary authority to combat climate change, say attorneys at Hogan Lovells.

  • Mitigating Supply Chain Risks Related To Uighur Forced Labor

    Author Photo

    In light of recent U.S. actions concerning China’s purported forced labor of Uighurs — an ethnic minority long targeted by the Chinese government — companies should conduct human rights due diligence, implement grievance mechanisms to capture abuses in their supply chains, and review supplier contracts, says Betsy Popken at Orrick.

  • Ethics Considerations For Law Firms Implementing AI

    Author Photo

    Richard Finkelman and Yihua Astle at Berkeley Research Group discuss the ethical and bias concerns law firms must address when implementing artificial intelligence-powered applications for recruiting, conflict identification and client counseling.

  • Gov't Contractors Can Promote Diversity Despite Trump Order

    Author Photo

    While federal contractors are required to comply with the Trump administration’s recent ban on certain racial sensitivity trainings, it’s likely that President-elect Joe Biden will overturn the restrictions after taking office, and there are many ways to advance diversity and inclusion agendas in the meantime, says Allison Powers at Barack Ferrazzano.

  • Trends In Fiscal 2020 Bid Protests Sustained By GAO: Part 2

    Author Photo

    Many bid protests sustained by the U.S. Government Accountability Office in fiscal 2020 involved emerging issues, including conflicts of interest, corrective actions, solicitation challenges and eligibility of awardees — concerns that will continue to arise, say Joseph Berger and Thomas Mason at Thompson Hine.

Want to publish in Law360?


Submit an idea
Can't find the article you're looking for? Click here to search the Aerospace & Defense archive.
Hello! I'm Law360's automated support bot.

How can I help you today?

For example, you can type:
  • I forgot my password
  • I took a free trial but didn't get a verification email
  • How do I sign up for a newsletter?
Beta
Ask a question!