Automotive

  • May 18, 2018

    House Again Mulls Bill Clearing DOJ To Sue OPEC

    Economic and antitrust experts at a House subcommittee hearing Friday largely endorsed the latest version of legislation authorizing the Department of Justice to sue OPEC for conspiring to inflate oil prices, leading to soaring gas prices for American consumers.

  • May 18, 2018

    Tesla Inks $1M OT Deal With Calif. Car Salespeople

    Tesla Inc. reached a $1 million deal Thursday to end a putative class action alleging the electric-car maker failed to pay overtime and provide proper meal and rest breaks to hundreds of California-based owner advisers and sales advisers, according to court filings.

  • May 18, 2018

    Tesla Whistleblower Suit Paused Amid Arbitration Bid

    Tesla Inc. has been pushing back on a retaliation suit in New Jersey federal court brought by a former employee who said he was demoted and ultimately fired for reporting that the company was selling damaged cars to unsuspecting customers, with the automaker claiming he’s bound by an arbitration clause.

  • May 18, 2018

    DC Circ. Nixes EPA Superfund Listing Of Polluted Ind. Site

    The D.C. Circuit overturned the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s placement of an Indiana site with groundwater pollution on the federal Superfund list, finding Friday the agency ignored evidence contradicting a key conclusion used to justify the listing.

  • May 18, 2018

    BMW Seeks Toss Of German Auto Antitrust MDL

    BMW asked a California federal court Thursday to reject multidistrict litigation claiming it participated in a decadeslong antitrust conspiracy with fellow German automakers Audi, Volkswagen, Mercedes-Benz and others on car technology, costs, suppliers and emissions equipment, saying the buyers’ ill-defined antitrust injuries and illogical claims do not hold up.

  • May 18, 2018

    Nissan Must Face 5-State Shattering-Sunroof Suit

    A California federal judge on Thursday rejected an effort by Nissan North America Inc. to partly dismiss a suit that accuses the automaker of violating five states’ consumer protection laws by selling vehicles with defective panoramic sunroofs, saying the latest version of the suit passes muster under the laws of Illinois, California and Colorado.

  • May 17, 2018

    Hawaii, NM Reach $7M Settlement Over Takata Air Bags

    Hawaii on Wednesday said that it had reached a $7 million settlement, shared with the state of New Mexico and the U.S. Virgin Islands, with Takata over claims over the now-bankrupt Japanese company's sales of potentially fatal air bags.

  • May 17, 2018

    Rent-A-Wreck Sanctions Denied After Ch. 11 Dismissal

    Proposed sanctions against Rent-A-Wreck of America Inc. and its legal counsel stalled Thursday when a Delaware bankruptcy judge said that because their Chapter 11 petitions were not shown to have clearly been filed for a bad faith purpose, sanctions were not justified.

  • May 17, 2018

    VW Gets Claims Trimmed In Defective Sunroof Class Action

    A California federal judge on Thursday tossed most of the claims in a Volkswagen driver's proposed class action accusing the carmaker of selling vehicles with sunroofs that might "spontaneously shatter," saying an amendment would be necessary to revive state consumer protection and fraud claims.

  • May 17, 2018

    BMW Soft-Close Doors Are A 'Guillotine,' NY Couple Says

    A New York couple accused BMW in federal court of selling vehicles with soft-closing automatic doors that are “modern day guillotines” without a basic sensor to keep them from closing on body parts, saying the automaker knows of the dangers associated with the technology but continues to market it.

  • May 17, 2018

    A Chat With Perkins Practice Management Chief Toby Brown

    In this monthly series, legal recruiting experts at Major Lindsey & Africa interview management from top law firms about navigating an increasingly competitive business environment. Here we feature Toby Brown, chief practice management officer at Perkins Coie LLP.

  • May 17, 2018

    Auto Service Contract Clause Nixes Class Action: Panel

    A New Jersey state appeals court on Thursday upended a trial court ruling allowing a putative consumer fraud class action against a vehicle warranty business to proceed, saying an arbitration clause in the customer's service contract clearly shows he waived his right to sue.

  • May 16, 2018

    EPA's Pruitt Acknowledges Ethics Missteps, Notes Changes

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Scott Pruitt on Wednesday told senators that after months of facing ethics investigations, he has instituted new procedures intended to avoid such troublesome entanglements in the future.

  • May 16, 2018

    9th Circ. Ruling May Help Independent Contractors Unionize

    Last week's Ninth Circuit ruling reviving the U.S. Chamber of Commerce's antitrust challenge to a first-of-its-kind Seattle law letting app-based drivers form quasi-unions was a blow to Uber and Lyft drivers in the Emerald City, but it may prove to be a win for independent contractors in the long run, attorneys say.

  • May 16, 2018

    DOT Needs To Stop Stalling On Seat Belt Rule, DC Circ. Told

    Auto safety groups blasted the U.S. Department of Transportation for doing little or nothing to implement a congressional mandate requiring automobile warnings when backseat passengers don't buckle up, with arguments in D.C. Circuit on Wednesday that focused heavily on its jurisdiction and what exactly was required of the DOT.

  • May 16, 2018

    Auto Parts Maker Reaches $5.2M Deal To Leave Antitrust MDL

    Japanese auto parts manufacturer Toyo Denso Co. Ltd. and its subsidiary Weastec Inc. agreed to pay approximately $5.2 million to settle a proposed class action from consumers alleging they conspired to fix the prices of ignition and power window parts, according to documents filed in Michigan federal court Wednesday.

  • May 16, 2018

    Boston Cabbie Fights Uber’s Bid To Escape Antitrust Claims

    A Boston cab driver alleging Uber monopolized the market by helping its drivers circumvent local taxi rules asked a Massachusetts federal court Wednesday to preserve his antitrust claims, saying the ride-hailing giant is trying to hold his proposed class action to an “unrealistic and legally unsupportable higher pleading standard.”

  • May 16, 2018

    Aussie Court Boosts Yazaki Cartel Fine To Record AU$46M

    Australia’s full Federal Court on Wednesday ordered Japanese auto parts company Yazaki Corp. to pay a record AU$46 million (roughly $34.5 million) fine for its role in an international price-fixing scheme, a nearly 500 percent increase over the fine previously ordered in the case.

  • May 16, 2018

    EPA's Wehrum Hopes To Avoid Calif. Fuel Economy Fight

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency will continue to negotiate with California in an effort to stave off a brewing legal war over greenhouse gas emissions regulations for vehicles, top agency air official Bill Wehrum told a House panel Wednesday.

  • May 16, 2018

    Greenberg Guides Transpo-Focused VectoIQ In $200M IPO

    VectoIQ Acquisition Corp., a blank-check company focused on acquiring a business in the automotive or smart mobility industry, saw shares begin trading Wednesday after raising $200 million through an initial public offering guided by Greenberg Traurig LLP.

Expert Analysis

  • Relief From CFPB’s Auto Guidance May Be Short-Lived

    Dowse Rustin IV

    In a dramatic win for the auto finance industry, Congress recently voted to reverse the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau’s 2013 guidance related to fair lending and interest rates for indirect loans. However, such rollbacks may not be enough to create long-lasting regulatory relief, say attorneys with Nelson Mullins Riley & Scarborough LLP.

  • Opinion

    Why Won't Judicial Nominees Affirm Brown V. Board Of Ed?

    Franita Tolson

    On May 17, 1954, the U.S. Supreme Court decided Brown v. Board of Education, recognizing a moral and legal truth that should be beyond question in American society. The refusal by some of President Donald Trump's judicial nominees to say whether they believe the case was decided correctly is indicative of the narrow-minded elitism they would bring to the bench, says professor Franita Tolson of the University of Southern California's Gould School of Law.

  • The Lawyers' Guide To Cloud Computing

    Daniel Garrie

    In deciding whether cloud computing is right for the organization or firm, an attorney must consider cloud computing’s significant impact on the electronic discovery process, say Daniel Garrie, managing partner at Law & Forensics LLC, and David Cass, chief information security officer at IBM Cloud.

  • The Future Of Antitrust Claims At The ITC

    Matthew Rizzolo

    In March, the U.S. International Trade Commission's dismissal of U.S. Steel’s complaint caused some to question whether there remained a viable path for antitrust-based claims at the ITC. But the initiation of an antitrust-based Section 337 investigation just days later shows that the door for antitrust claims at the ITC has not closed, say attorneys with Ropes & Gray LLP.

  • Opinion

    Recovering Lawyers' Lost Position Of Independence

    Samuel Samaro

    In these politically divisive times, many ask whether our institutions and traditions can help us return to a greater consensus. In days long past, the legal profession could have been counted on to serve just such a function. But lawyers are now just as polarized as everyone else, says Samuel Samaro of Pashman Stein Walder Hayden PC.

  • TCPA Trends: Impact On Future Litigation And Compliance

    Michael Reif

    The number of Telephone Consumer Protection Act lawsuits has grown exponentially in recent years, and courts have issued several significant decisions in recent months that may have implications for future TCPA litigation and compliance efforts, say Michael Reif and Chelsea Walcker of Robins Kaplan LLP.

  • 8 Reasons To Take A Fresh Look At Your Law Office Lease

    Tiffany Winne

    After moving into a new law office, tenants often file their signed leases away, figuring that the terms are set for a few years at least. However, leases can be very flexible instruments, and should be reviewed annually even if nothing seems amiss, says Tiffany Winne of Savills Studley Inc.

  • A General Counsel's Tips For Succeeding As A New Associate

    Jason Idilbi

    Based on his experience as a BigLaw associate for six years and now as general counsel for a tech startup, Jason Idilbi of Passport Labs offers some best practices for newer associates — whether they are serving external clients or senior attorneys within their firms.

  • How Iran Deal Pullout Will Impact Cos. And Investors

    Ama Adams

    President Donald Trump’s highly controversial decision to reinstate U.S. sanctions against Iran represents a dramatic change in policy, with significant consequences for international business and investors. The move could quickly put companies that are subject to the laws of multiple jurisdictions in a legally untenable position, say attorneys with Ropes & Gray LLP.

  • Series

    Judging A Book: Berzon Reviews 'We The Corporations'

    Judge Marsha Berzon

    My advice to prospective clerks will now include the suggestion that they read Adam Winkler's new book, "We the Corporations: How American Businesses Won Their Civil Rights," for the same reason I recommend taking a corporations course — appreciating the critical role of business corporations in American life and law, says Ninth Circuit Judge Marsha Berzon.