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Automotive

  • June 19, 2018

    Fiat Chrysler Can't Skirt Drivers' Pacifica Defect Suit

    A California federal judge on Tuesday denied Fiat Chrysler’s bid to dodge a putative class action, saying the suit raises a reasonable inference that the automaker knew a defect addressed in two Technical Service Bulletins could cause its Pacificas to stall or shut off without warning.

  • June 19, 2018

    White House Mulling Big NEPA Changes

    The Trump administration said Tuesday it was considering major changes in how the nation’s cornerstone environmental law is implemented with an eye toward streamlining permitting processes, prompting howls of criticism from green groups.

  • June 19, 2018

    Buyer Wants Nissan '0% Financing' Suit Back In State Court

    The car buyer accusing a Nissan contractor and a New Jersey dealership of falsely claiming their vehicle service agreements could be financed with no-interest payments defended his putative class action from a dismissal bid on Monday, arguing that his case should be returned to state court.

  • June 19, 2018

    3M Wants Out Of California Drivers' Unpaid Tolls Suit

    3M Co. on Monday told a federal judge it should not be held responsible for the actions of the California toll road operators accused of unlawfully using drivers' personal information to collect unpaid tolls and charge overblown fines, as it was a contractor that played a limited role in the roads' operations.

  • June 19, 2018

    Fed. Circ. Affirms PTAB Ax Of Airbag Patent

    The Patent Trial and Appeal Board correctly struck down claims in an airbag patent owned by a subsidiary of licensing firm Acacia Research Corp., the Federal Circuit ruled Tuesday.

  • June 19, 2018

    A Chat With Holland & Knight CFO Mia Stutzman

    In this monthly series, legal recruiters at Major Lindsey & Africa interview management from top law firms about navigating an increasingly competitive business environment. Here we feature Mia Stutzman, chief financial officer at Holland & Knight LLP.

  • June 18, 2018

    GCs Tackle Law Firm Culture In Diversity Push

    Following an American Bar Association pledge, in-house attorneys are taking a harder line in demanding diversity from their outside counsel, and they're seeking to play a larger role in the workings of the law firms they hire.

  • June 18, 2018

    The Hurdles Facing BigLaw’s Minority Women

    We asked BigLaw for data on female minority lawyers for the first time this year, and the results show an industry that is failing to attract and retain them. Here’s a look at the challenges facing these attorneys — and how a few firms are defying the norm.

  • June 18, 2018

    The Best Firms For Minority Equity Partners

    The legal industry is making sluggish gains when it comes to attracting and retaining attorneys of color, but this select group of firms is taking broader strides to diversify at the top.

  • June 18, 2018

    Uber Ditches Boston Cabbies' Antitrust Claims

    A Massachusetts federal judge on Monday nixed amended antitrust claims from hundreds of Boston-area taxi companies in consolidated suits accusing Uber of unfairly pricing its ride-hailing services to monopolize the market, saying there’s no evidence Uber set artificially low rates or set out to destroy competition.

  • June 18, 2018

    Lyft Says TCPA Suit Can't Tie It To Unwanted Texts

    Lyft Inc. sought Friday to drop off a proposed class action alleging it sent unwanted text messages in violation of the Telephone Consumer Protection Act, arguing in California federal court that the consumers hadn't even shown how Lyft itself was responsible for sending the messages.

  • June 18, 2018

    Horizon Cancels €169M Towbar Co. Buy Amid Antitrust Woes

    Tow truck and trailer equipment maker Horizon Global Corp. has dropped its planned €169 million ($198.9 million) purchase of the Brink Group after competition authorities in the United Kingdom and Germany raised concerns over the remaining towbar suppliers in the market if the deal went through.

  • June 18, 2018

    CDK Slams Attempted Info Grab In Car Dealer Data MDL

    Software provider CDK Global LLC urged an Illinois federal judge on Monday to reject what it called overbroad discovery demands from plaintiffs in consolidated multidistrict litigation alleging CDK monopolized access to car sales and service data in software licensed to auto dealerships, saying documents related to a recently scuttled acquisition are irrelevant.

  • June 18, 2018

    In Their Own Words: Minority Partners On Reaching The Top

    Despite decades of industrywide initiatives, movement up the ladder has stagnated for minority lawyers. Here, five industry success stories tell Law360 about the paths they took and what needs to change in BigLaw.

  • June 18, 2018

    Ally Financial Settles Contract Fee Fight For $20M

    Ally Financial Inc. will pay $19.7 million to end a putative class action alleging the bank holding company subjected vehicle buyers to extra fees not listed on their lease-to-own agreements, according to a settlement agreement filed Friday in Florida federal court.

  • June 18, 2018

    Fiat Investors Win Cert. In Emissions-Fraud Losses Suit

    A New York federal judge certified a class of Fiat Chrysler investors in a stock-drop suit alleging the automaker lied about using emissions-cheating devices in vehicles in an effort to inflate the company's stock price.

  • June 18, 2018

    15 Minutes With Uber's General Counsel

    In a recent interview, Uber General Counsel Tony West discussed some of the ongoing controversies embroiling the ride-hailing giant, how startups at the cutting edge of new industries can best position themselves for long-term success and what changing a company's culture means to him.

  • June 15, 2018

    Minority Lawyers On Why They Left BigLaw

    Despite the proliferation of diversity committees and inclusion initiatives, corporate law firms remain overwhelmingly white and male, especially at leadership levels. Here, minority attorneys discuss their reasons for leaving a large firm.

  • June 15, 2018

    Taking On The ‘Petri Dish’ Of BigLaw Bias

    The often-informal processes for deciding matters like compensation at law firms can create, as one expert put it, a “petri dish” for the effects of unconscious bias. Here’s how some firms are looking to shake up the system.

  • June 15, 2018

    The Best Firms For Minority Attorneys

    While U.S. law firms have long vowed to make their ranks more diverse and inclusive, the industry has long failed to deliver on those promises. Here are the firms making some headway, according to this year’s Diversity Snapshot.

Expert Analysis

  • #MeToo At Law Firms And What We Can Do About It

    Beth Schroeder.JPG

    While some may say it’s ironic, it’s also embarrassing and enraging that the very industry that offers anti-harassment training, policies and counsel now finds itself the subject of #MeToo headlines. The American Bar Association recommendation that will bring about the greatest change is the call to provide alternative methods for reporting violations, says Beth Schroeder, chair of Raines Feldman LLP's labor and employment group.

  • New Licenses Ease Ukraine, Russia Business Wind-Downs

    Seetha Ramachandran

    The U.S. Department of Treasury Office of Foreign Assets Control continues its effort to allow U.S. persons to wind down operations or existing contracts that would otherwise violate Ukraine- and Russia-related sanctions. Even though OFAC has issued general licenses for this purpose, U.S. persons may need to obtain specific licenses to fully divest their interests, say attorneys with Schulte Roth & Zabel LLP.

  • Scrutinizing Noncash Settlements In Consumer Class Actions

    Thomas Dickerson

    In consumer class action settlements, cash provides the class and the court evaluating a proposed settlement with a quantitatively measurable benefit. Noncash settlements require heightened scrutiny by the court, since they are generally worth less to consumers than cash, and may benefit defendants and class counsel more than class members, says retired judge Thomas Dickerson.

  • Knowledge Lawyers Can Help Firms Stay Ahead Of The Curve

    Vanessa Pinto Villa

    In a profession notoriously averse to change, it should come as no surprise that there is skepticism about the value of having attorneys perform nonbillable tasks. But U.S. law firms have slowly begun to incorporate knowledge lawyers into their operations — and the trend is likely to continue, says Vanessa Pinto Villa of Hogan Lovells.

  • Bristol-Myers Squibb: 1 Year Later

    Adam Pollet

    In the year since the U.S. Supreme Court decided Bristol-Myers Squibb Co. v. Superior Court of California — limiting where plaintiffs can bring claims and curbing forum-shopping in mass tort litigation — courts have grappled with questions that the ruling did not address, and defendants have pursued jurisdictional defenses in class actions and federal cases that were not previously available, say attorneys with Eversheds Sutherland LLP.

  • An Unprecedented Look Inside The FARA Unit

    Brian Fleming

    For close observers of the Foreign Agents Registration Act, the June 8 release by the U.S. Department of Justice of over 50 FARA advisory opinions was a watershed. These opinions offer an unprecedented glimpse into how the FARA Registration Unit interprets the law, say Brian Fleming and Andrew Herman of Miller & Chevalier Chtd.

  • House Hearing Stirs Debate On Insuring Autonomous Vehicles

    Susan Lent

    A U.S. House subcommittee hearing last month on self-driving vehicles and the future of insurance highlighted stakeholders' differing views on whether technology companies should be legally required to provide insurers with vehicle data. A failure to reach agreement on data sharing will hamper the legislative process, say attorneys with Akin Gump Strauss Hauer & Feld LLP.

  • Why Lawyers Shouldn't Accept Fees In Cryptocurrency: Part 2

    John Reed Stark

    The legal industry has already begun to feel the impact of anti-bribery and anti-money laundering requirements. When involved with cryptocurrency trading and remittance, law firms face more than the risk of being perceived as organizations that support money laundering practices, says John Reed Stark of John Reed Stark Consulting LLC.

  • How National Security Auto Probe Redefines Trade Debate

    Pavan Krishnamurthy

    In May, the U.S. Department of Commerce began investigating the national security effects of imported automobiles and automotive parts under a once-obscure statute that has gained notoriety thanks to its use by the Trump administration. While this has led to intense reactions from Congress, the chance of legislative action before the midterms is limited, say Pavan Krishnamurthy and Neil Ellis of Sidley Austin LLP.

  • Why Lawyers Shouldn't Accept Fees In Cryptocurrency: Part 1

    John Reed Stark

    Law firms are increasingly accepting cryptocurrency as payment for services. While this might seem innovative and forward-thinking, ironically it is much more of a throwback, says John Reed Stark of John Reed Stark Consulting LLC.