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Automotive

  • September 25, 2018

    Mercedes Must Face Claims Of Fatal Seat Restraint Failure

    A Colorado federal judge has denied an attempt by Mercedes Benz USA and Daimler AG to dismiss a negligence suit filed by the heirs of a woman killed when her Smart car’s seating restraints allegedly failed, though the court tossed breach of warranty and consumer protection law violation claims.

  • September 25, 2018

    Lighthizer Defends Trump's Hard Line On China

    U.S. Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer defended President Donald Trump’s aggressive use of tariffs against China on Tuesday, harshly criticizing past administrations’ attempts to deal with Beijing on a diplomatic basis.

  • September 25, 2018

    9th Circ. Dismantles Uber Drivers' Misclassification Suits

    The Ninth Circuit on Tuesday dismantled a class of hundreds of thousands of Uber drivers alleging they were misclassified as independent contractors, handing the ride-hailing giant a major victory in a yearslong battle over whether it has skirted labor laws by considering its drivers to be contractors rather than employees.

  • September 24, 2018

    Investors Urge 7th Circ. To Revive Suit Over Fisker Fraud

    A group of investors who say they were duped into buying stock for electric car maker Fisker Automotive just before it went bankrupt urged the Seventh Circuit to revive their suit on Monday, saying the lower court incorrectly found it time-barred.

  • September 24, 2018

    IP Atty Can't Prove Ford Blocked Job Offers, 6th Circ. Says

    The Sixth Circuit on Monday declined to revive a suit by an intellectual property attorney who claims her former bosses at Ford Motor Co. conspired to block her from getting hundreds of prospective jobs, saying she hadn’t provided any basis for her conspiracy claims.

  • September 24, 2018

    Philly UberBlack Drivers Aren't Employees, 3rd Circ. Told

    Uber told the Third Circuit on Monday that it doesn’t control the day-to-day operations of Philadelphia-based UberBlack limo drivers who own their own businesses, rebuking allegations that the ride-hailing company misclassified the drivers as independent contractors to dodge paying minimum and overtime wages.

  • September 24, 2018

    GM Says Recall Issues Are Too Varied For Class Cert.

    General Motors has asked a New York federal judge not to grant class certification to vehicle owners in bellwether cases in California, Missouri and Texas who claim they lost out on the resale value of their cars due to vehicle recalls, arguing the issues are too varied among the individual cases to qualify for class status.

  • September 24, 2018

    Trump Inks Minor Tweaks To US-S. Korea Trade Accord

    President Donald Trump and South Korean President Moon Jae-in signed off on a series of modest changes to their governments' 2012 trade deal, adjusting the agreement's rules on automobile exports, customs and drug reimbursements.

  • September 24, 2018

    $1.2M Settlement Reached In WARN Act Suit Against RV Co.

    An RV company that shuttered in 2016 and the two entities that allegedly owned it have agreed to a $1.2 million deal to settle claims in a certified class action alleging workers were not given proper notice that they were getting axed.

  • September 24, 2018

    Kia HR Rep Who Helped Worker Claim Bias Has Suit Revived

    Businesses may not be able to fire human resources representatives who help co-workers bring discrimination claims against their employers, a split Eleventh Circuit panel said Monday in a published opinion reviving part of an ex-Kia HR rep’s retaliation suit against the company's Georgia plant.

  • September 24, 2018

    US-China Fight Shows No Sign Of Stopping As New Tariffs Hit

    The U.S. and Chinese governments installed fresh sets of tariffs on one another’s products Monday, opening a fresh front in a quickly escalating trade standoff that now covers about half of the goods traded between the two economic powerhouses.

  • September 21, 2018

    5G Uses And Regulatory Hurdles: What You Need To Know

    As the 5G technology standard takes shape and major wireless carriers push to make the service commercially available by next year, experts have identified virtual reality, self-driving cars and artificial intelligence as some of the top applications for the souped-up wireless networks. But regulatory hurdles and legal questions still beset the innovations.

  • September 21, 2018

    High Court Case On ERISA Burden Ends In Settlement

    A U.S. Supreme Court case that could have resolved a circuit split over where the burden of proof falls in Employee Retirement Income Security Act fiduciary-breach cases ended Thursday, with the high court tossing a suit between Alerus Financial NA and an employee stock-ownership program after the parties settled.

  • September 21, 2018

    Massachusetts Man Sues Toyota After Rodents Ate His Car

    A Massachusetts driver says Toyota has for years been outfitting vehicles with cost-saving, environmentally friendly electrical insulation that "uniquely attracted" rodents, causing an infestation and extensive damage to his vehicle, which is the subject of a lawsuit in Boston.

  • September 21, 2018

    Deals Rumor Mill: Lone Star, Deutsche-Commerzbank, Magneti

    Lone Star is reportedly mulling floating Xella, a tie-up between banking giants Deutsche Bank and Commerzbank has earned the favor of the German government, and Calsonic Kansei Corp. has roughly €5 billion ($5.9 billion) in financing for its bid to buy Magneti Marelli SpA.

  • September 21, 2018

    Truckers Insist Calif. Dynamex Standard Is Unconstitutional

    A trucking group on Thursday defended its suit claiming federal law overrides California's newly adopted standard for distinguishing between independent contractors and employees in wage order disputes, saying an onslaught of litigation over the standard proves there is an “actual controversy” requiring the court to intervene.

  • September 21, 2018

    Lyft Drivers Move For $1.95M Settlement Over Premium Pay

    A group of drivers for Lyft Inc. asked a California federal judge to approve the ride-hailing service's $1.95 million settlement of a class action suit alleging the company underpaid drivers who were supposed to receive prime-time premium pay, with about 33 percent of the payout going toward the class's attorneys' fees and expenses.

  • September 21, 2018

    Buyers' Flawed Emissions Tests Doom RICO Suit, Fiat Says

    Fiat Chrysler and engine manufacturer Cummins have pressed their bids to dump an amended proposed class action alleging they outfitted Dodge Ram trucks with emissions-cheating software, saying that consumers conducted unreliable tests that cannot support their Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act claims.

  • September 21, 2018

    Uber Gets Customer's TCPA Suit Sent To Arbitration

    An Illinois federal judge agreed that an Uber user leading a proposed Telephone Consumer Protection Act class action against the ride-hailing company consented to arbitrate any disputes when he signed up for the app, sending the suit to arbitration Thursday.

  • September 20, 2018

    Uber Presses 9th Circ. To Undo Driver Misclassification Suits

    Uber told the Ninth Circuit on Wednesday that its recent finding that federal law doesn’t preempt California’s decades-old standard for determining whether workers are employees or independent contractors should dismantle a class of hundreds of thousands of Uber drivers alleging they were misclassified and denied expense reimbursements and tips.

Expert Analysis

  • Open-Source Software In Connected Vehicles: Pros And Cons

    Marjorie Loeb

    As automobiles become part of the internet of things, some automakers and their suppliers are turning to open-source software to reduce costs, accelerate development and enhance interoperability. But a disciplined and thoughtful approach is needed to evaluate software licensing terms, functionality, stability and security, say attorneys with Mayer Brown LLP.

  • Series

    Judging A Book: Block Reviews 'Tough Cases'

    Judge Frederic Block

    In a new, extraordinary book, "Tough Cases: Judges Tell the Stories of Some of the Hardest Decisions They’ve Ever Made," 13 of my judicial brethren have courageously and dramatically humanized the judicial process, says U.S. District Judge Frederic Block of the Eastern District of New York.

  • Sharing Economy Brings New Opportunities For Insurers

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    The ever-expanding sharing economy operates within the framework of an insurance industry that is constantly adapting to new technologies and risks. Collaboration between traditional carriers and innovators will lead to more participants for platforms and more customers for carriers, says Alexandra Fernandez of Zelle LLP.

  • 8 Innovative Ways To Empower Jurors

    Christopher Campbell

    Much time and attention have been focused on improving lawyers' abilities to communicate with and persuade juries in complex trials. But it is equally important to equip and prepare jurors to become better students in the courtroom, say attorneys with DLA Piper and Litstrat Inc.

  • Cloud Computing Clearly The Future For Small Firms

    Holly Urban

    While in-house technology investments on the scale and complexity needed to compete with large firms remain cost prohibitive for small and midsize law firms, cloud-based services offer significant cost savings and productivity gains with little to no capital investment, says Holly Urban of Effortless Legal LLC.

  • Leveraging Today's Lateral Associate Market

    Darin Morgan

    With the Milbank/Cravath pay scale once again equalizing compensation at many Am Law 100 firms, there is even more pressure for firms to differentiate themselves to top lateral associate candidates. This presents strategic considerations for both law firms and lateral candidates throughout the recruitment process, says Darin Morgan of Major Lindsey & Africa.

  • Q&A

    Back To School: Stanford's Jeff Fisher Talks Supreme Court

    Jeffrey Fisher

    In this series featuring law school luminaries, Stanford Law School professor Jeffrey Fisher discusses his motivation for teaching, arguing before the U.S. Supreme Court and what the court might look like if Judge Brett Kavanaugh is confirmed.

  • Muddy Road Ahead For Autonomous Vehicle Liability In EU

    Anna Masser

    The product liability regimes related to driverless cars in various European countries remain far from harmonized, and lawmakers trail behind the fast-moving reality. As the European Commission works to update the European Product Liability Directive, evolving legal definitions of "producer," "product" and "defect" will be vital for the industry, say attorneys with Jones Day.

  • Calif.'s New Rules For Lawyers Move Closer To ABA Model

    Mark Loeterman

    The first comprehensive overhaul of California's Rules of Professional Conduct in nearly 30 years becomes operational on Nov. 1. Some of the new rules mirror the model language used by the American Bar Association, but many continue to reflect California’s unique approach to certain ethical questions, says Mark Loeterman of Signature Resolution LLC.

  • Know The Limits To Atty Public Statements During A Trial

    Matthew Giardina

    The balancing act between protecting attorneys’ speech rights and ensuring unbiased adjudications was highlighted recently in two cases — when Michael Cohen applied for a restraining order against Stephanie Clifford's attorney, and when Johnson & Johnson questioned whether a Missouri talc verdict was tainted by public statements from the plaintiffs' counsel, says Matthew Giardina of Manning Gross & Massenburg LLP.