• February 9, 2018

    Plaintiffs Want To Rework $1B Deal With GM Ch. 11 Trust

    A group alleging damages from defects in old General Motors' cars Thursday asked a New York bankruptcy court for a few more weeks to rework a $1 billion settlement a GM bankruptcy trust backed out of last month, saying the trust has new management and counsel and a deal may still be possible.

  • February 9, 2018

    Toyota Beats Suit Over Special Tire Pricing

    A Massachusetts federal judge on Thursday dismissed a proposed class action against Toyota Motor Sales USA and Colonial Imports Corp., ruling that the buyer failed to show he was harmed when he purchased three tires, which he claims were deceptively marked up, in order to get the fourth tire for one dollar.

  • February 9, 2018

    Ford Must Bargain With IUOE Workers At Car Test Site

    A National Labor Relations Board Judge ruled Thursday that Ford Motor Co. violated federal labor law when it refused to recognize or bargain with an International Union of Operating Engineers local that had represented workers at a vehicle testing facility it purchased.

  • February 9, 2018

    Uber, Waymo Settle Trade Secret Case Amid Trial

    Waymo and Uber have reached a settlement of their self-driving car trade secret row a third of the way through trial, with Uber agreeing to give Waymo a slice of the ride-hailing company's $72 billion equity worth approximately $245 million.

  • February 8, 2018

    Smoking Gun Or Red Herring: Waymo, Uber Debate 14K Files

    Waymo’s attorneys questioned a small army of computer experts in a California federal court Thursday in a bid to show that 14,000 files a former employee downloaded from Waymo’s server evidenced corporate espionage meant to speed up Uber’s race toward self-driving cars, while Uber’s attorneys countered the downloads were automatic and meaningless.

  • February 8, 2018

    Volkswagen Fines Top EPA's Biggest 2017 Enforcement Cases

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency on Thursday released highlights of its 2017 enforcement efforts, pointing to a $2.8 billion criminal fine against Volkswagen AG for cheating emissions standards and a $2 million Clean Water Act penalty against Tyson Poultry Inc.

  • February 8, 2018

    Uber Drivers’ Pay Suit ‘Classic’ Class Action, Judge Says

    A California federal judge on Thursday appeared open to certifying a class of Uber drivers who claim that the ride-hailing giant shorts drivers by paying them based on the actual distance they drive, instead of on the inflated projections Uber charges passengers, saying it seems to him that it’s a “classic case of a class action” based on a form contract.

  • February 8, 2018

    Dealers Slam Tesla Info Grab In 6th Circ. Direct-Sales Row

    The Michigan Automobile Dealers Association told the Sixth Circuit Wednesday that Tesla’s bid to grab privileged communications from three dealerships in its challenge to a Michigan ban on direct-to-consumer auto sales has sweeping First Amendment implications and that Tesla’s “sour grapes” attack on the state law doesn’t hold water.

  • February 8, 2018

    Ford, Driver Fight Over $1.5M Attys’ Fees At 9th Circ.

    Ford Motor Co. on Thursday urged the Ninth Circuit to reverse a decision awarding $1.5 million in attorneys’ fees to a woman who accused the automaker of failing to disclose acceleration defects in 150,000 vehicles, arguing that a program to fix the vehicles was prompted by a federal investigation and not the woman’s lawsuit.

  • February 8, 2018

    Fiat Chrysler Takes Early Swing At Stalling Pacificas Suit

    Fiat Chrysler told a California federal court Wednesday that a class action over Chrysler Pacificas that can allegedly stall at high speeds missed certain presuit requirements, and asked for dismissal of a claim it says is contingent on those requirements.

  • February 8, 2018

    Auto Parts Supplier Sues CBP For Seizing ‘Lawful’ Parts

    An automobile parts supplier accused the government of illegally seizing its imported repair grilles in a suit in Delaware federal court Wednesday, saying the parts are not counterfeit but “lawful replacement parts.”

  • February 8, 2018

    GM Gets Engine Defect Class Action Trimmed

    A California federal judge on Wednesday trimmed a proposed class action accusing General Motors LLC of manufacturing a vehicle engine that consumes excessive oil, potentially causing unexpected engine shutdowns or fires.

  • February 7, 2018

    Google Co-Founder Mentor Then Rival, Ex-Uber CEO Testifies

    Former Uber CEO Travis Kalanick told a California federal jury on Wednesday that he’d considered Alphabet Inc. CEO Larry Page a mentor before he heard Google was planning to jump into the ride-hailing business, recounting a professional rivalry in Alphabet unit Waymo’s trade secrets case against the company he co-founded.

  • February 7, 2018

    Judge Questions Attys' Fees In 2 Takata Air Bag Deals

    A Florida federal judge expressed concern Wednesday about the attorneys' fees requested in settlements worth more than $702 million between Honda, Nissan and a class of vehicle owners who sued the car manufacturers over the cost of replacing their defective Takata air bags.

  • February 7, 2018

    Uber Deal Over Workers' Comp Class Action Hits Speed Bump

    A California judge on Wednesday refused to preliminarily approve Uber's settlement that would provide drivers with occupational accident insurance in exchange for ending putative class claims that the ride-hailing company improperly denied them workers’ compensation, saying the contract terms between the drivers and the insurance company are unclear.

  • February 7, 2018

    TxDOT Contractor Didn't Cause Ice Patch That Killed Driver

    A Texas federal judge on Wednesday said a Texas Department of Transportation contractor is immune to a suit alleging negligence in connection with a driver’s car-accident death, saying the contractor was in compliance with its roadwork contract with TxDOT, which conducted daily inspections of the work performed.

  • February 7, 2018

    DOJ Taps Compliance Monitor In Hoegh Price-Fixing Deal

    The U.S. Department of Justice told a Maryland federal judge Tuesday that it has tapped an independent compliance monitor for Norwegian shipping company Hoegh Autoliners AS, which was hit with a $21 million criminal fine last year for conspiring to fix prices for shipping cars and trucks.

  • February 7, 2018

    BMW Dealerships Not ‘Places Of Business,' Judge Rules

    BMW dealerships that are owned by other companies are not “places of business” for the automaker under the U.S. Supreme Court’s TC Heartland ruling, a California federal judge has held in a decision transferring a patent case against BMW to Delaware for improper venue.

  • February 7, 2018

    Tesla Demands Dealer Docs In Mich. Direct Auto Sales Fight

    Tesla told a Michigan federal judge Tuesday that the Michigan Automobile Dealers Association shouldn’t be allowed to hide evidence about its lobbying efforts supporting a 2014 state ban on car manufacturers selling vehicles directly to consumers, a law the electric car maker insists was an “anti-Tesla” amendment.

  • February 6, 2018

    Kalanick Tells Jury Self-Driving Cars Are 'Winner-Take-All'

    Former Uber CEO Travis Kalanick took the stand Tuesday in a California federal jury trial over allegations his company stole self-driving car trade secrets from Alphabet unit Waymo, testifying that leadership in driverless car technology is an “existential” challenge for the ride-hailing company he co-founded.

Expert Analysis

  • How IT And Procurement Pros Can Inform Law Firm Budgeting

    Steve Falkin

    As law firms begin preparing for their annual budget review, Steve Falkin and Lee Garbowitz of HBR Consulting discuss why firm leaders should give their internal information technology and procurement teams a seat at the table.

  • Getting Real About Artificial Intelligence At Law Firms

    Mark Williamson

    Artificial intelligence needs to be legally defensible in order to be useful to law firms. There are requirements for making this happen, says Mark Williamson, co-founder and chief technology officer of Hanzo Archives Ltd.

  • Proportionality, Not Perfection, Is What Matters

    John Rosenthal

    A few jurists and commentators have recently caused a stir in the e-discovery community by arguing that litigants should avoid using keyword searches to filter or cull a document population before using predictive coding. This “no-cull” rationale undermines the principle of proportionality at the heart of the recent changes to Federal Rule 26, say John Rosenthal and Jason Moore of Winston & Strawn LLP.

  • Make Way For The 'Unicorns'

    Lucy Endel Bassli

    By "unicorn" I don’t mean the next great tech startup with a valuation of $1 billion. I mean the new breed of lawyers realizing that there are better ways to get their day jobs done, says Lucy Endel Bassli, assistant general counsel leading the legal operations and contracting functions at Microsoft Corp.

  • Series

    Judging A Book: McConnell Reviews 'Unequal'

    Judge John McConnell

    As widespread claims of sexual misconduct continue to surface in the entertainment industry and beyond, a discussion of how judges treat workplace discrimination cases may be particularly timely. Here, U.S. District Judge John McConnell reviews the book "Unequal: How America’s Courts Undermine Discrimination Law," by professors Sandra Sperino and Suja Thomas.

  • Roundup

    Making Pro Bono Work

    Pro Bono Thumbnail

    In this series, attorneys explore the challenges and rewards of pro bono volunteering in the legal profession.

  • Being There: Preparing Witnesses For Depositions

    Alan Hoffman

    Preparing witnesses to be deposed is a critical element of discovery. It is important to remember that each witness is an individual with unique personal qualities, strengths and weaknesses. Getting to know the witness helps establish rapport and trust, says Alan Hoffman of Husch Blackwell LLP.

  • Series

    Making Pro Bono Work: The Sidley-Exelon Partnership

    Kelly Huggins

    Exelon Corp. and Sidley Austin LLP have been working together on both short- and long-term pro bono matters for the past 10 years. We offer a glimpse of how we got started and what we have done in the hope that other corporate legal departments and law firms might find ways to work together to meet the legal needs of the poor, say Kelly Huggins, pro bono counsel at Sidley Austin, and Margaret Balsley-Cross, assistant general counsel at Exelon.

  • Recipe For Legal Project Management: Look To BBQ Champs

    Anthony Rospert

    As a master certified barbecue judge with the Kansas City Barbeque Society, I have noticed that the top pitmasters follow a consistent process in approaching each and every competition. Their "secret sauce" — employing project management principles — can also help lawyers achieve success, says Anthony Rospert of Thompson Hine LLP.

  • Series

    Making Pro Bono Work: Can You Practice In Your State?

    Eve Runyon

    The justice gap is a well-documented problem and over the past two decades, law firms have mobilized attorneys to provide millions of hours of pro bono every year. But for many in-house counsel, there remains a big hurdle — restrictive multijurisdictional practice rules, says Eve Runyon, president and CEO of Pro Bono Institute.