Automotive

  • November 16, 2017

    3rd Circ. Won't Revive RICO Claims Over Allied Bankruptcy

    The Third Circuit on Wednesday found that investment firm Yucaipa Cos. Ltd. had no standing for its $170 million RICO suit claiming two hedge funds conspired to wipe out its debt claim against bankrupt car hauler Allied Systems Holdings Inc.

  • November 16, 2017

    Class Attys In Uber Text Message Spat Seek $6.4M In Fees

    The attorneys representing a group of individuals who allegedly received unwanted text messages from Uber asked an Illinois federal court Wednesday for $6.35 million in fees after securing a $20 million settlement, saying the deal is an exceptional result that wouldn’t have happened without their efforts.

  • November 16, 2017

    Pols Weigh In On NAFTA's Labor, Car Rules Ahead Of Talks

    As the fifth round of talks to renegotiate the North American Free Trade Agreement began Wednesday, lawmakers from both sides of the aisle came forward with a fresh set of demands, looking to exert their will on the agreement’s rules for labor and automobiles.

  • November 15, 2017

    Motorsport Co. Files For Ch. 11, Aiming To Clear $300M Debt

    Velocity Holding Company Inc. and its 18 powersports industry subsidiaries filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy in Delaware on Wednesday, declaring liabilities of more than $100 million in a comprehensive recapitalization aimed at eliminating $300 million in debt.

  • November 15, 2017

    EPA Unveils Some Ozone Info After Enviro Lawsuit Threat

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency on Wednesday identified more than 2,000 counties in the U.S., as well as tribal lands, that meet ozone standards set in 2015, weeks after environmentalists threatened to sue the agency for blowing a statutory deadline to publish the list.

  • November 15, 2017

    Bridgestone's $9.4M Price-Fixing Deal Gets Initial OK

    A Michigan federal judge on Tuesday gave her initial approval to a $9.36 million settlement between Bridgestone Corp. and a putative class of car dealerships, which claim the tire maker took part in a price-fixing scheme for rubber parts that reduce engine and road vibration.

  • November 15, 2017

    Toyota Has Reached Deals In 496 Cases In Acceleration MDL

    Toyota has struck deals in 496 lawsuits over deaths and injuries stemming from an alleged unintended-acceleration defect in some of its vehicles, lawyers on both sides of multidistrict litigation told a California federal court Wednesday.

  • November 15, 2017

    Auto Dealer Review Site Launches Suit Over 'Confusing' Mark

    A company that operates a website allowing consumers to review auto dealers launched a lawsuit in Massachusetts federal court Tuesday seeking to block another company from using a mark it calls “confusingly similar” to its own DealerRater mark.

  • November 15, 2017

    Geico Hit With Auto Repair Shop Price-Fixing Suit

    Geico has reached unlawful agreements with a group of preferred auto collision repair shops to fix the maximum price of repairs and steer policyholders from competing repair shops, a competing shop claimed in Oregon federal court Tuesday.

  • November 14, 2017

    Progressive To Settle Medicare FCA Suit For $2M

    Two units of insurance giant Progressive will pay more than $2 million to settle allegations that they pushed car insurance policyholders’ medical claims that they should have paid off on Medicare and Medicaid, in violation of the False Claims Act, the U.S. Department of Justice announced Tuesday.

  • November 14, 2017

    Insurer Must Pay $25M Thailand Flood Claim, 6th Circ. Told

    Federal-Mogul Corp. on Tuesday urged the Sixth Circuit to uphold a Michigan federal judge's ruling that its insurance carrier must pay $25 million for the flood-related shutdown of an auto parts plant in Thailand, contending that a flood sublimit in the insurer's policy doesn't apply to the losses resulting from the closure.

  • November 14, 2017

    Waymo, Uber Missed 'Lobotomy' Jury Instruction, Judge Says

    A California federal judge said Tuesday that Uber and Waymo attorneys have “blown an opportunity” in their driverless car trade secret trial by failing to craft jury instructions on a vital issue in Silicon Valley: whether engineers need “a frontal lobotomy before going to their next job” or can apply what they’ve learned during prior employment.

  • November 14, 2017

    Wells Fargo Adds $5.4M To Military Car Repo Settlement

    The Justice Department on Tuesday announced that it had secured an additional $5.4 million from Wells Fargo & Co. related to an Obama-era settlement with the bank over allegedly improper repossessions of service members’ cars.

  • November 14, 2017

    What Telecom Attys Need To Know About Connected Cars

    As the possibility of connected vehicles moves from a futuristic development to an impending reality, the automotive sector has been busy trying to establish technical standards to guide the innovation. But the realm also includes sophisticated communications technology that is taking the telecommunications industry on a wild ride.

  • November 14, 2017

    VW To Pay $69M To NJ Over Diesel Emissions Scandal

    The Volkswagen Group of America will pay New Jersey $69 million to settle claims that it sold diesel vehicles that cheated environmental standards, Gov. Chris Christie said Tuesday, an amount the state says represents more cash per vehicle than any other state settlement in the scandal to date.

  • November 14, 2017

    BMW Hit With New Engine-Defect Class Action

    BMW is facing yet another class action in New Jersey federal court over engine defect claims, this one alleging that problems with certain models’ chain assemblies caused poor acceleration or sudden engine failure, according to a complaint filed Monday.

  • November 14, 2017

    Uber's 'Inadequate' Driver Screening Led To Rape, Women Say

    Two women who say they were raped by Uber drivers hit the ride-hailing company with a multimillion-dollar California federal class action Tuesday alleging its “woefully inadequate” driver screening process has allowed drivers to sexually assault or harass more than 1,000 riders.

  • November 14, 2017

    Takata's Japanese Parent Wins Ch. 15 Recognition

    The Delaware bankruptcy judge presiding over the Takata family of cases said Tuesday that he would grant the company’s Japanese parent Chapter 15 recognition over the objections of a group of plaintiffs suing over the debtor’s dangerously defective airbag inflators who say their due process rights are being squelched.

  • November 14, 2017

    Dallas Prosecutor Fired After Alleged Uber Altercation

    A Dallas County assistant district attorney has been fired after an Uber driver accused her of drunkenly hitting and berating him, accusing him of kidnapping her, and abusing her position by threatening to have him fired.

  • November 14, 2017

    Black Ex-Tesla Worker Says Factory Is Race Bias 'Hotbed'

    Electric car maker Tesla Inc.’s California factory is “a hotbed for racist behavior” toward African-Americans that includes the frequent use of racial epithets, a former worker charged Monday in a state race discrimination class action.

Expert Analysis

  • Getting Real About Artificial Intelligence At Law Firms

    Mark Williamson

    Artificial intelligence needs to be legally defensible in order to be useful to law firms. There are requirements for making this happen, says Mark Williamson, co-founder and chief technology officer of Hanzo Archives Ltd.

  • Proportionality, Not Perfection, Is What Matters

    John Rosenthal

    A few jurists and commentators have recently caused a stir in the e-discovery community by arguing that litigants should avoid using keyword searches to filter or cull a document population before using predictive coding. This “no-cull” rationale undermines the principle of proportionality at the heart of the recent changes to Federal Rule 26, say John Rosenthal and Jason Moore of Winston & Strawn LLP.

  • Make Way For The 'Unicorns'

    Lucy Endel Bassli

    By "unicorn" I don’t mean the next great tech startup with a valuation of $1 billion. I mean the new breed of lawyers realizing that there are better ways to get their day jobs done, says Lucy Endel Bassli, assistant general counsel leading the legal operations and contracting functions at Microsoft Corp.

  • Series

    Judging A Book: McConnell Reviews 'Unequal'

    Judge John McConnell

    As widespread claims of sexual misconduct continue to surface in the entertainment industry and beyond, a discussion of how judges treat workplace discrimination cases may be particularly timely. Here, U.S. District Judge John McConnell reviews the book "Unequal: How America’s Courts Undermine Discrimination Law," by professors Sandra Sperino and Suja Thomas.

  • Roundup

    Making Pro Bono Work

    Pro Bono Thumbnail

    In this series, attorneys explore the challenges and rewards of pro bono volunteering in the legal profession.

  • Being There: Preparing Witnesses For Depositions

    Alan Hoffman

    Preparing witnesses to be deposed is a critical element of discovery. It is important to remember that each witness is an individual with unique personal qualities, strengths and weaknesses. Getting to know the witness helps establish rapport and trust, says Alan Hoffman of Husch Blackwell LLP.

  • Series

    Making Pro Bono Work: The Sidley-Exelon Partnership

    Kelly Huggins

    Exelon Corp. and Sidley Austin LLP have been working together on both short- and long-term pro bono matters for the past 10 years. We offer a glimpse of how we got started and what we have done in the hope that other corporate legal departments and law firms might find ways to work together to meet the legal needs of the poor, say Kelly Huggins, pro bono counsel at Sidley Austin, and Margaret Balsley-Cross, assistant general counsel at Exelon.

  • Recipe For Legal Project Management: Look To BBQ Champs

    Anthony Rospert

    As a master certified barbecue judge with the Kansas City Barbeque Society, I have noticed that the top pitmasters follow a consistent process in approaching each and every competition. Their "secret sauce" — employing project management principles — can also help lawyers achieve success, says Anthony Rospert of Thompson Hine LLP.

  • Series

    Making Pro Bono Work: Can You Practice In Your State?

    Eve Runyon

    The justice gap is a well-documented problem and over the past two decades, law firms have mobilized attorneys to provide millions of hours of pro bono every year. But for many in-house counsel, there remains a big hurdle — restrictive multijurisdictional practice rules, says Eve Runyon, president and CEO of Pro Bono Institute.

  • Opinion

    Representing Women At The Intersection Of Law And Finance

    Andrea Mitchell

    To the extent that companies have tolerated predominantly male leadership in the past because it was deemed necessary for growth and prosperity, or viewed diversity and the underrepresentation of women strictly as human resources issues, a growing body of research suggests otherwise, say Andrea Mitchell and Valerie Hletko of Buckley Sandler LLP.