Automotive

  • February 8, 2018

    Ford, Driver Fight Over $1.5M Attys’ Fees At 9th Circ.

    Ford Motor Co. on Thursday urged the Ninth Circuit to reverse a decision awarding $1.5 million in attorneys’ fees to a woman who accused the automaker of failing to disclose acceleration defects in 150,000 vehicles, arguing that a program to fix the vehicles was prompted by a federal investigation and not the woman’s lawsuit.

  • February 8, 2018

    Fiat Chrysler Takes Early Swing At Stalling Pacificas Suit

    Fiat Chrysler told a California federal court Wednesday that a class action over Chrysler Pacificas that can allegedly stall at high speeds missed certain presuit requirements, and asked for dismissal of a claim it says is contingent on those requirements.

  • February 8, 2018

    Auto Parts Supplier Sues CBP For Seizing ‘Lawful’ Parts

    An automobile parts supplier accused the government of illegally seizing its imported repair grilles in a suit in Delaware federal court Wednesday, saying the parts are not counterfeit but “lawful replacement parts.”

  • February 8, 2018

    GM Gets Engine Defect Class Action Trimmed

    A California federal judge on Wednesday trimmed a proposed class action accusing General Motors LLC of manufacturing a vehicle engine that consumes excessive oil, potentially causing unexpected engine shutdowns or fires.

  • February 7, 2018

    Google Co-Founder Mentor Then Rival, Ex-Uber CEO Testifies

    Former Uber CEO Travis Kalanick told a California federal jury on Wednesday that he’d considered Alphabet Inc. CEO Larry Page a mentor before he heard Google was planning to jump into the ride-hailing business, recounting a professional rivalry in Alphabet unit Waymo’s trade secrets case against the company he co-founded.

  • February 7, 2018

    Judge Questions Attys' Fees In 2 Takata Air Bag Deals

    A Florida federal judge expressed concern Wednesday about the attorneys' fees requested in settlements worth more than $702 million between Honda, Nissan and a class of vehicle owners who sued the car manufacturers over the cost of replacing their defective Takata air bags.

  • February 7, 2018

    Uber Deal Over Workers' Comp Class Action Hits Speed Bump

    A California judge on Wednesday refused to preliminarily approve Uber's settlement that would provide drivers with occupational accident insurance in exchange for ending putative class claims that the ride-hailing company improperly denied them workers’ compensation, saying the contract terms between the drivers and the insurance company are unclear.

  • February 7, 2018

    TxDOT Contractor Didn't Cause Ice Patch That Killed Driver

    A Texas federal judge on Wednesday said a Texas Department of Transportation contractor is immune to a suit alleging negligence in connection with a driver’s car-accident death, saying the contractor was in compliance with its roadwork contract with TxDOT, which conducted daily inspections of the work performed.

  • February 7, 2018

    DOJ Taps Compliance Monitor In Hoegh Price-Fixing Deal

    The U.S. Department of Justice told a Maryland federal judge Tuesday that it has tapped an independent compliance monitor for Norwegian shipping company Hoegh Autoliners AS, which was hit with a $21 million criminal fine last year for conspiring to fix prices for shipping cars and trucks.

  • February 7, 2018

    BMW Dealerships Not ‘Places Of Business,' Judge Rules

    BMW dealerships that are owned by other companies are not “places of business” for the automaker under the U.S. Supreme Court’s TC Heartland ruling, a California federal judge has held in a decision transferring a patent case against BMW to Delaware for improper venue.

  • February 7, 2018

    Tesla Demands Dealer Docs In Mich. Direct Auto Sales Fight

    Tesla told a Michigan federal judge Tuesday that the Michigan Automobile Dealers Association shouldn’t be allowed to hide evidence about its lobbying efforts supporting a 2014 state ban on car manufacturers selling vehicles directly to consumers, a law the electric car maker insists was an “anti-Tesla” amendment.

  • February 6, 2018

    Kalanick Tells Jury Self-Driving Cars Are 'Winner-Take-All'

    Former Uber CEO Travis Kalanick took the stand Tuesday in a California federal jury trial over allegations his company stole self-driving car trade secrets from Alphabet unit Waymo, testifying that leadership in driverless car technology is an “existential” challenge for the ride-hailing company he co-founded.

  • February 6, 2018

    Former UAW VP's Widow Admits To Tax Fraud In Chrysler Con

    The widow of a former United Automobile Workers vice president pled guilty to filing false tax returns in Michigan federal court Tuesday, an offense stemming from $1.5 million in bribes her husband accepted from Fiat Chrysler during collective bargaining negotiations between the company and the union.

  • February 6, 2018

    Nissan Fights Cert. Bid In Sports-Car Clutch Defect Suit

    A proposed class of Nissan sports car owners shouldn’t be approved because their claims involving a “soft” or “sticky” clutch pedal are dominated by individual issues, the automaker told a California federal court on Monday.

  • February 6, 2018

    Advance Auto Parts Hit With Shareholder Class Action

    Advance Auto Parts was hit with a class action in Delaware federal court on Tuesday by shareholders who say that the company’s alleged concealment and then revelation of poor financial conditions caused two drops in their shares’ value.

  • February 6, 2018

    Uber Exec Says Company Can't Justify Covering Up Breach

    A top cybersecurity executive for Uber told lawmakers Tuesday that the company cannot justify covering up a massive 2016 data breach that exposed 57 million user accounts while paying hackers to delete the data and keep the episode quiet.

  • February 6, 2018

    Uber Seeks Arbitration In Breach Suit Alleging Hush Payment

    Uber Technologies Inc. on Monday moved to force into arbitration a proposed class action in Illinois alleging the ride-hailing giant failed to safeguard app users’ private information and tried to cover up a 2016 data breach with a $100,000 payment to hackers behind the breach.

  • February 6, 2018

    Takata Whistleblowers Say Ch. 11 Plan Must Reserve $250M

    A pair of purported whistleblowers who say they could be entitled to up to $250 million of the nearly $1 billion restitution fund in Takata’s criminal case over faulty air bag inflators objected Tuesday to the company’s Chapter 11 plan on grounds it doesn’t take into account any pending whistleblower award.

  • February 6, 2018

    Deals Rumor Mill: Mitsubishi, Triton, Boeing

    Multiple sizable investment funds have expressed interest in a planned $2.8 billion British offshore wind project, Mitsubishi Heavy Industries is selling a majority of its 10 percent stake in Mitsubishi Motors, and Boeing is looking to establish a new venture based around the commercial aviation business of Brazil's Embraer.

  • February 6, 2018

    Buyers Fight Arbitration Bid In Auto Parts Price-Fixing MDL

    Direct purchaser plaintiffs asked a Michigan federal judge Monday to reject KYB Corp.'s bid to toss or force into arbitration a complaint alleging KYB conspired with other manufacturers to fix prices on auto parts, specifically shock absorbers, saying they’re not parties to KYB’s limited warranty.

Expert Analysis

  • 5 Legal Technology Predictions For 2018

    Jeff Ton

    While each new year is expected to bring fresh challenges to the legal industry, 2018 will be particularly disruptive to the status quo. Both law firms and organizations that cater to the legal community should prepare for developments like increasing pressure from international clients and data security risks caused by multigenerational gaps, says Jeff Ton of Bluelock LLC.

  • Indirect Purchaser Cases In 2017: Key District Court Rulings

    Chris Micheletti

    Over the last year, there were some interesting cases in the indirect purchaser class action arena, with district courts addressing pleading motions, class certification in “pay-for-delay” drug cases, and class certification of nationwide and multistate class claims based on California’s state antitrust law, say Chris Micheletti and Christina Tabacco of Zelle LLP.

  • Indirect Purchaser Cases In 2017: Key Appeals Court Rulings

    Chris Micheletti

    As with 2016, there were no major U.S. Supreme Court decisions impacting indirect purchaser claims in 2017. Unlike 2016, however, several circuit court decisions addressed important issues such as ascertainability, 23(b)(3) predominance, and indirect versus direct purchaser status, say Chris Micheletti and Christina Tabacco of Zelle LLP.

  • Litigation Finance Trends To Watch In 2018

    Jay Greenberg

    Jay Greenberg and Max Volsky, co-founders of litigation finance platform LexShares Inc., analyze emerging trends based on conversations with their investors and executives in this rapidly evolving sector.

  • The Enneagram And The Practice Of Law

    Jennifer Gibbs

    Study of the Enneagram personality typing system can provide attorneys with better insights into themselves, and into those they interact with professionally, including clients, opposing counsel and judges, says Jennifer Gibbs of Zelle LLP.

  • Series

    Judging A Book: Tymkovich Reviews 'Gorsuch'

    Timothy Tymkovich

    John Greenya’s new book, “Gorsuch: The Judge Who Speaks for Himself,” offers readers something the confirmation hearings did not — the backstory of Neil Gorsuch and a glimpse of who Justice Gorsuch is, says Chief Judge Timothy Tymkovich of the Tenth Circuit.

  • 5 Things To Watch For In FCPA Enforcement This Year

    David Simon

    After much hand-wringing in 2017 about whether Foreign Corrupt Practices Act enforcement would diminish radically under President Donald Trump, it’s now safe to say that all signs point toward continued and vigorous enforcement, say attorneys with Foley & Lardner LLP.

  • Roundup

    5 Most-Read Legal Industry Articles Of 2017

    2017 Trends

    What business of law topics piqued reader interest in 2017? Take a look back at the year's five most-read legal industry articles from Law360 guest authors.

  • Spoliation Scrutiny: Disparate Standards For Distinct Mediums

    Robin Shah

    Two years ago, Federal Rule of Civil Procedure 37(e) was amended to provide a clearer road map for courts analyzing whether to permit sanctions for the spoliation of evidence. Yet there is still no specific guidance for when a sanctions request relates to electronically stored and nonelectronically stored information, says Skadden associate Robin Shah.

  • Trends In Automotive Technology: 2017 And The Road Ahead

    David Cavanaugh

    Automotive technology promises to be a focus of intellectual property disputes and regulatory attention in the coming years. In this article, attorneys with WilmerHale look back at 2017 developments to see where auto industry patenting, IP litigation and policymaking may be heading.