Automotive

  • February 9, 2018

    Too Soon For Korean Financial Authority Ruling, Judge Says

    A financial professional in Texas was premature in seeking a judgment declaring that a South Korean financial regulator must comply with a request she plans to make for evidence in support of her breach of contract case against a Seoul-headquartered tire company, a New York federal judge ruled Thursday.

  • February 9, 2018

    Polaris ATV Patent Partly Revived By Fed. Circ.

    The Federal Circuit gave new life on Friday to part of a Polaris Industries Inc. all-terrain vehicle patent that the Patent Trial and Appeal Board invalidated following a challenge from rival ATV maker Arctic Cat Inc.

  • February 9, 2018

    Waymo Settlement With Uber Ends Wild Ride

    Waymo and Uber reached a settlement Friday to end their blockbuster trade secrets fight over self-driving car technology, capping off a year of contentious discovery disputes, shocking revelations and numerous delays. Here's a play-by-play of how we got here.

  • February 9, 2018

    Uber, Lyft Can’t Bypass Local Taxes, SF Lawsuit Claims

    The city and county of San Francisco hit the state of California with a lawsuit Thursday, challenging a recently enacted law that allows ride-hailing services like Lyft and Uber to operate in cities without obtaining local licenses, causing the city to lose millions in associated taxes.

  • February 9, 2018

    Plaintiffs Want To Rework $1B Deal With GM Ch. 11 Trust

    A group alleging damages from defects in old General Motors' cars Thursday asked a New York bankruptcy court for a few more weeks to rework a $1 billion settlement a GM bankruptcy trust backed out of last month, saying the trust has new management and counsel and a deal may still be possible.

  • February 9, 2018

    Toyota Beats Suit Over Special Tire Pricing

    A Massachusetts federal judge on Thursday dismissed a proposed class action against Toyota Motor Sales USA and Colonial Imports Corp., ruling that the buyer failed to show he was harmed when he purchased three tires, which he claims were deceptively marked up, in order to get the fourth tire for one dollar.

  • February 9, 2018

    Ford Must Bargain With IUOE Workers At Car Test Site

    A National Labor Relations Board Judge ruled Thursday that Ford Motor Co. violated federal labor law when it refused to recognize or bargain with an International Union of Operating Engineers local that had represented workers at a vehicle testing facility it purchased.

  • February 9, 2018

    Uber, Waymo Settle Trade Secret Case Amid Trial

    Waymo and Uber have reached a settlement of their self-driving car trade secret row a third of the way through trial, with Uber agreeing to give Waymo a slice of the ride-hailing company's $72 billion equity worth approximately $245 million.

  • February 8, 2018

    Smoking Gun Or Red Herring: Waymo, Uber Debate 14K Files

    Waymo’s attorneys questioned a small army of computer experts in a California federal court Thursday in a bid to show that 14,000 files a former employee downloaded from Waymo’s server evidenced corporate espionage meant to speed up Uber’s race toward self-driving cars, while Uber’s attorneys countered the downloads were automatic and meaningless.

  • February 8, 2018

    Volkswagen Fines Top EPA's Biggest 2017 Enforcement Cases

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency on Thursday released highlights of its 2017 enforcement efforts, pointing to a $2.8 billion criminal fine against Volkswagen AG for cheating emissions standards and a $2 million Clean Water Act penalty against Tyson Poultry Inc.

  • February 8, 2018

    Uber Drivers’ Pay Suit ‘Classic’ Class Action, Judge Says

    A California federal judge on Thursday appeared open to certifying a class of Uber drivers who claim that the ride-hailing giant shorts drivers by paying them based on the actual distance they drive, instead of on the inflated projections Uber charges passengers, saying it seems to him that it’s a “classic case of a class action” based on a form contract.

  • February 8, 2018

    Dealers Slam Tesla Info Grab In 6th Circ. Direct-Sales Row

    The Michigan Automobile Dealers Association told the Sixth Circuit Wednesday that Tesla’s bid to grab privileged communications from three dealerships in its challenge to a Michigan ban on direct-to-consumer auto sales has sweeping First Amendment implications and that Tesla’s “sour grapes” attack on the state law doesn’t hold water.

  • February 8, 2018

    Ford, Driver Fight Over $1.5M Attys’ Fees At 9th Circ.

    Ford Motor Co. on Thursday urged the Ninth Circuit to reverse a decision awarding $1.5 million in attorneys’ fees to a woman who accused the automaker of failing to disclose acceleration defects in 150,000 vehicles, arguing that a program to fix the vehicles was prompted by a federal investigation and not the woman’s lawsuit.

  • February 8, 2018

    Fiat Chrysler Takes Early Swing At Stalling Pacificas Suit

    Fiat Chrysler told a California federal court Wednesday that a class action over Chrysler Pacificas that can allegedly stall at high speeds missed certain presuit requirements, and asked for dismissal of a claim it says is contingent on those requirements.

  • February 8, 2018

    Auto Parts Supplier Sues CBP For Seizing ‘Lawful’ Parts

    An automobile parts supplier accused the government of illegally seizing its imported repair grilles in a suit in Delaware federal court Wednesday, saying the parts are not counterfeit but “lawful replacement parts.”

  • February 8, 2018

    GM Gets Engine Defect Class Action Trimmed

    A California federal judge on Wednesday trimmed a proposed class action accusing General Motors LLC of manufacturing a vehicle engine that consumes excessive oil, potentially causing unexpected engine shutdowns or fires.

  • February 7, 2018

    Google Co-Founder Mentor Then Rival, Ex-Uber CEO Testifies

    Former Uber CEO Travis Kalanick told a California federal jury on Wednesday that he’d considered Alphabet Inc. CEO Larry Page a mentor before he heard Google was planning to jump into the ride-hailing business, recounting a professional rivalry in Alphabet unit Waymo’s trade secrets case against the company he co-founded.

  • February 7, 2018

    Judge Questions Attys' Fees In 2 Takata Air Bag Deals

    A Florida federal judge expressed concern Wednesday about the attorneys' fees requested in settlements worth more than $702 million between Honda, Nissan and a class of vehicle owners who sued the car manufacturers over the cost of replacing their defective Takata air bags.

  • February 7, 2018

    Uber Deal Over Workers' Comp Class Action Hits Speed Bump

    A California judge on Wednesday refused to preliminarily approve Uber's settlement that would provide drivers with occupational accident insurance in exchange for ending putative class claims that the ride-hailing company improperly denied them workers’ compensation, saying the contract terms between the drivers and the insurance company are unclear.

  • February 7, 2018

    TxDOT Contractor Didn't Cause Ice Patch That Killed Driver

    A Texas federal judge on Wednesday said a Texas Department of Transportation contractor is immune to a suit alleging negligence in connection with a driver’s car-accident death, saying the contractor was in compliance with its roadwork contract with TxDOT, which conducted daily inspections of the work performed.

Expert Analysis

  • Do I Need New Trial Counsel? 9 Questions To Ask

    Russell Hayman

    Initial selection of defense counsel is usually made at the outset of litigation, long before it is known whether the case may actually proceed to trial. Attorneys with McDermott Will & Emery discuss questions in-house lawyers should consider when deciding whether their litigation counsel should remain lead trial counsel in a case proceeding to trial.

  • Lessons From President Trump's Failed Judicial Nominations

    Arun Rao

    On Tuesday, the Trump administration announced 12 new judicial nominations. We will soon discover whether these candidates learned from the mistakes of the three nominees forced to withdraw in December after bipartisan concerns arose over their qualifications, says Arun Rao, executive VP of Investigative Group International.

  • Breaking The Workplace Silence Safely

    Jack Schaedel

    If companies are not careful about how messages regarding workplace harassment are communicated, and don’t first take the time to think about how some workers will perceive them, it can actually create the very problem they're trying to avoid, says Jack Schaedel of Scali Rasmussen.

  • How To Control Data As Technology Complicates E-Discovery

    Peter Ostrega

    While technology is making certain aspects of e-discovery faster and easier, it is also creating new challenges as quickly as we can provide solutions. The good news is that there are concrete steps businesses can take to address those challenges, says Peter Ostrega of Consilio LLC.

  • A Survey Of In-House Attorney Views On Trade Secrets

    David Almeling

    In an attempt to peek behind the corporate curtain and pick the brains of those with unrivaled access to their companies’ trade secrets, we surveyed 81 in-house attorneys who work on trade secret issues. We discovered many interesting findings — and one alarming trend, say attorneys with O’Melveny & Myers LLP.

  • 6 E-Discovery Predictions For 2018

    Erich Potter

    Erich Potter, discovery counsel with Oles Morrison Rinker & Baker LLP, discusses six ways e-discovery will continue to excite and confound in 2018.

  • 6 Roles To Embrace In An Evolving Legal Industry

    Rob MacAdam

    Smart law firms are increasingly positioning professionals to proactively guide them as the legal landscape reshapes itself, harnessing six emerging roles within their organizational charts to embrace new approaches, tools and systems, says Rob MacAdam of HighQ.

  • Opinion

    This Year, Let’s Invest In Lawyer Resiliency

    krishtel.photo.jpg

    Highly profitable companies have comprehensive corporate wellness programs that realize plateauing health care costs, greater employee engagement, and a demonstrable competitive advantage. The legal field needs a similar awakening, says Rudhir Krishtel, a former partner of Fish & Richardson and senior patent counsel at Apple.

  • 5 Legal Technology Predictions For 2018

    Jeff Ton

    While each new year is expected to bring fresh challenges to the legal industry, 2018 will be particularly disruptive to the status quo. Both law firms and organizations that cater to the legal community should prepare for developments like increasing pressure from international clients and data security risks caused by multigenerational gaps, says Jeff Ton of Bluelock LLC.

  • Indirect Purchaser Cases In 2017: Key District Court Rulings

    Chris Micheletti

    Over the last year, there were some interesting cases in the indirect purchaser class action arena, with district courts addressing pleading motions, class certification in “pay-for-delay” drug cases, and class certification of nationwide and multistate class claims based on California’s state antitrust law, say Chris Micheletti and Christina Tabacco of Zelle LLP.