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Automotive

  • May 16, 2018

    Boston Cabbie Fights Uber’s Bid To Escape Antitrust Claims

    A Boston cab driver alleging Uber monopolized the market by helping its drivers circumvent local taxi rules asked a Massachusetts federal court Wednesday to preserve his antitrust claims, saying the ride-hailing giant is trying to hold his proposed class action to an “unrealistic and legally unsupportable higher pleading standard.”

  • May 16, 2018

    Aussie Court Boosts Yazaki Cartel Fine To Record AU$46M

    Australia’s full Federal Court on Wednesday ordered Japanese auto parts company Yazaki Corp. to pay a record AU$46 million (roughly $34.5 million) fine for its role in an international price-fixing scheme, a nearly 500 percent increase over the fine previously ordered in the case.

  • May 16, 2018

    EPA's Wehrum Hopes To Avoid Calif. Fuel Economy Fight

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency will continue to negotiate with California in an effort to stave off a brewing legal war over greenhouse gas emissions regulations for vehicles, top agency air official Bill Wehrum told a House panel Wednesday.

  • May 16, 2018

    Greenberg Guides Transpo-Focused VectoIQ In $200M IPO

    VectoIQ Acquisition Corp., a blank-check company focused on acquiring a business in the automotive or smart mobility industry, saw shares begin trading Wednesday after raising $200 million through an initial public offering guided by Greenberg Traurig LLP.

  • May 15, 2018

    Uber's Move Away From Arbitration Falls Short, Attys Say

    Uber won plaudits Tuesday with its announcement that it would no longer steer sexual misconduct claims into arbitration, but critics were quick to pump the brakes on the praise, noting that the ride-hailing giant can still use arbitration to keep class actions from seeing their day in court.

  • May 15, 2018

    Nonclass Attys Deserve Cut Of $10B VW Deal, 9th Circ. Told

    Hundreds of lawyers claiming their work helped secure the $10 billion resolution of multidistrict litigation from consumers over Volkswagen AG's diesel emissions scandal told the Ninth Circuit on Monday that they deserve a cut of attorneys' fees and costs because their contributions were significant.

  • May 15, 2018

    Judge OKs More Depositions In Fiat Chrysler Stock Drop Suit

    A New York federal judge on Monday partially granted a bid from Fiat Chrysler investors to depose more witnesses and add interrogatories in their suit alleging the automaker hid the existence of emissions control instruments dubbed defeat devices in vehicles in an effort to inflate share prices.

  • May 15, 2018

    Toyota Unit Gets Early Exit From DOJ Fair Lending Deal

    Toyota’s auto lending branch said in a filing with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission on Tuesday that the U.S. Department of Justice and Consumer Financial Protection Bureau agreed the company has satisfied the requirements for early termination of a consent order reached in 2016 over allegations of unfair lending practices.

  • May 15, 2018

    Enviros Join EPA Fuel Economy Rollback Fight

    Seven environmental and consumer advocacy groups on Tuesday launched the latest in a string of challenges before the D.C. Circuit to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's decision to revisit Obama-era greenhouse gas vehicle emission standards.

  • May 15, 2018

    Uber’s Bid To Ditch Assault Claims 'A Costly Sideshow': Judge

    Uber Technologies Inc. on Tuesday lost its bid to trim assault and false imprisonment claims filed by a 16-year-old girl who said the ride-hailing giant negligently hired a lascivious driver who held her in his car against her will, after a San Francisco judge called Uber's motion "a costly sideshow."

  • May 15, 2018

    EPA Post-VW Emission Testing Could Be Better: OIG

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Office of Inspector General on Tuesday said the EPA has improved its vehicle emissions testing programs in the wake of the Volkswagen emissions cheating scandal, but should do more to increase compliance.

  • May 15, 2018

    Car Dealer Data Cos. Must Face Monopolization Claims In MDL

    An Illinois federal judge has given a partial reprieve to CDK Global LLC and Reynolds & Reynolds Co. from consolidated multidistrict litigation alleging they monopolized access to car sales and service data in software licensed to auto dealerships, tossing part of a data integration company’s antitrust claims.

  • May 15, 2018

    Honda CR-V Owners Call Crash 'Sensing' System Dangerous

    A trio of California Honda CR-V owners filed a proposed class action Monday in California federal court against the automaker, claiming their cars came equipped with defective collision avoidance systems that are actually making them less safe.

  • May 15, 2018

    Uber, Lyft Vow Not To Push Arbitration For Sex Assault Claims

    Uber Technologies Inc. and Lyft Inc. said Tuesday that they will no longer push arbitration for individual claims of sexual assault or sexual harassment against riders, drivers or employees, clearing the way for such claims to be heard in court.

  • May 15, 2018

    US Seeks To Sink Challenge To Trump's '2-For-1' Order

    The federal government has told a D.C. district court that public interest groups have again failed to show that they properly brought suit against President Donald Trump's executive order that said for every new regulation, two have to be repealed, arguing that the groups can't demonstrate the order caused specific harm.

  • May 15, 2018

    VW Offers Reimbursements To End Faulty-Engine Row

    Volkswagen AG and its Audi AG brand have agreed in New Jersey federal court to reimburse a proposed class of drivers for the costs of repairing an alleged defect that puts certain vehicles at risk of losing engine power.

  • May 14, 2018

    Tenn. Tractor Supplier Gets 3 Years For $43M Ponzi Scheme

    A Tennessee federal judge on Monday sentenced a businessman to three years in prison and ordered him to pay more than $10 million in restitution to victims of a multiyear scheme in which he obtained and misused more than $43 million in investments for his tractor supply company.

  • May 14, 2018

    Jevic Workers Say Supreme Court Ruling Bars Ch. 11 Deal

    Attorneys for workers whose bankruptcy appeal led to a U.S. Supreme Court ruling last year that narrowed the use of Chapter 11 structured settlement dismissals told a Delaware judge Monday the high court ruling nullified a deal that company lenders now want to reassert.

  • May 14, 2018

    Drivers Fight Fiat Chrysler’s Bid To Nix Pacifica Defect Suit

    A California couple suing Fiat Chrysler over an alleged defect that causes its Pacificas to stall or shut off without warning said Friday the automaker knew of the glitch and had a duty to warn consumers before they purchased their vehicles, telling a federal judge FCA US LLC can’t duck their putative class action.

  • May 14, 2018

    Pa. Justices To Mull GM’s Change To Dealer Reimbursements

    The Pennsylvania Supreme Court said Monday it would wade into a dispute over whether General Motors had the authority to change its policy on reimbursements for warranty work completed by the company's dealerships.

Expert Analysis

  • Finance-Savvy Millennials Are Shifting Business Of Law

    Michael Perlich

    The impact of millennials has already been felt within the legal community by our eagerness to embrace new technologies. One way that we will have potentially even more impact lies in our willingness to embrace new ways of developing business and financing law, says Michael Perich of Burford Capital LLC.

  • Opinion

    Attorney-Client Privilege Is Alive And Well

    Genie Harrison

    The FBI raid of the office of President Donald Trump’s personal lawyer set off a firestorm of controversy about the sanctity of the attorney-client privilege, epitomized by Trump's tweet that the "privilege is dead." But attorney-client privilege is never taken lightly — I have battle scars from the times I have sought crime-fraud exceptions, says Genie Harrison of the Genie Harrison Law Firm.

  • Roundup

    Dissolving Practice

    Dissolving Practice

    In this series, experts discuss the unique aspects of closing a law firm, and some common symptoms of dysfunctionality in a firm that can be repaired before it's too late.

  • Series

    Dissolving Practice: How To Fix A Dysfunctional Law Firm

    Larry Richard

    I am often asked, “When there are one or more partner departures, what can a firm do to prevent this from escalating to a catastrophic level?” The short answer is “nothing.” Law firms need to adopt culture-strengthening lifestyles to prevent defections from occurring in the first place, says Larry Richard of LawyerBrain LLC.

  • Who's Liable For A Crash When It's The Car Driving?

    Jim Jordan

    In a fully autonomous vehicle, a passenger's reaction to a traffic emergency is as irrelevant as her ethical calculations about potential injuries to herself and others. But if she agreed in advance to the safety protocols in the vehicle's programming, could she share liability in an accident? No one knows the answer yet, says Jim Jordan of Munsch Hardt Kopf & Harr PC.

  • New Russian Oligarch Sanctions Will Require Prompt Action

    Grant Leach

    Last week, the U.S. Treasury Department's Office of Foreign Assets Control added several Russian oligarchs, political officials and businesses under their control to its Specially Designated Nationals and Blocked Persons List. These sanctions will likely impose serious compliance challenges for both U.S. and non-U.S. persons doing business with Russia, say attorneys with Husch Blackwell LLP.

  • Series

    Dissolving Practice: Partner Agreement Clauses That Can Help

    ​​​​​Leslie Corwin

    Given the competing public policies of protecting clients’ right to counsel of their choice, lawyer mobility, and the fiduciary duty partners owe to a dissolved firm, it behooves law firms to carefully review their partnership agreements to make sure they adequately spell out what happens in the unfortunate event that the law firm chooses to wind down, say ​​​​​Leslie Corwin and Rachel Sims of Blank Rome LLP.

  • Polaris And The Return Of The Utility Requirement

    Michael Rounds

    For the vast majority of the 1952 Patent Act’s history, the requirement that an invention possess “utility” has been such a low bar as to effectively be nonexistent. Perhaps the tension highlighted in the Federal Circuit's Polaris v. Arctic Cat decision will prove the impetus needed to brush the dust off of the utility requirement in future cases, say Michael Rounds and Adam Yowell of Brownstein Hyatt Farber Schreck LLP.

  • When Are Minority Stockholders Controllers?

    Scott Barshay

    The Delaware Chancery Court's recent decision in a Tesla stockholder case shows that even a shareholder with a “relatively low” ownership stake representing a “small block” may be found to be controlling under certain circumstances, say attorneys with Paul Weiss Rifkind Wharton & Garrison LLP.

  • The Time Is Right For New Jersey To Adopt Daubert

    Timothy Freeman

    The New Jersey Supreme Court may soon decide whether to adopt the Daubert standard for admissibility of expert witness testimony. The searching inquiry into the reliability of proffered expert testimony that is required by Daubert protects the integrity of the jury system by ensuring that jurors are not misled by unreliable evidence, says Timothy Freeman of Tanenbaum Keale LLP.