Banking

  • November 24, 2017

    Forex Wrangle Triggers Late Rewrite Of EU Derivative Laws

    European financial regulators said Friday they are reviewing some aspects of the final stage of new derivative laws that enter into force across the EU in January, following concerns that the legislation clashes with U.S. and other foreign standards.

  • November 24, 2017

    UK Litigation Roundup: Here's What You Missed In London

    The last week has seen Kazakhstan and its national bank file a Financial List claim against the Bank of New York Mellon, the Law Society sue Barclays and a Greek commercial shipping manager take on an insurance brokerage. Here, Law360 looks at those and other new claims in the U.K.

  • November 24, 2017

    Watchdog Guides On Protecting Investors When Funds Terminate

    Global securities regulators have unveiled 14 steps on good practice for financial firms to follow when ending investment funds, in response to investor protection concerns.

  • November 23, 2017

    Regulator Reveals Bank Compliance Officers' Top Challenges

    The pace, volume and sheer complexity of regulatory change is the biggest challenge faced by wholesale banks, a survey of compliance departments by the U.K. finance watchdog revealed on Thursday.

  • November 22, 2017

    Consumers Say Hedge Fund Financed Illegal Tribal Lending

    Vermont residents on Tuesday hit a hedge fund with a proposed class action in federal court alleging it helped concoct a sham tribal payday lending scheme meant to skirt laws preventing companies from charging consumers exorbitant interest rates while hiding behind tribal sovereign immunity.

  • November 22, 2017

    Latham Steers Indian Life Insurance Co.'s $1.3B IPO

    Latham & Watkins LLP has represented the underwriters of HDFC Standard Life Insurance Co. Ltd. in its $1.33 billion initial public offering in Mumbai, marking another capital markets transaction for the firm’s India practice, which has guided more than $6.5 billion in IPOs this year.

  • November 22, 2017

    CFTC Sees Steep Drop In Enforcement Actions In 2017

    The U.S. Commodity Futures Trading Commission on Wednesday announced that it had imposed nearly $413 million in sanctions in fiscal 2017, less than half of the penalties issued in the previous fiscal year and the lowest since 2011.

  • November 22, 2017

    Hunton Moves To Toss $34M Stanford Deal Objections

    Hunton & Williams LLP asked a Texas federal judge Tuesday to reject the objections that have been raised to its $34 million deal to settle allegations that it aided Robert Allen Stanford’s $7 billion Ponzi scheme, saying the settlement is fair and won’t impact the rights of other parties embroiled in litigation over the scheme.

  • November 22, 2017

    Finance Group Slams Proposed $12B CFPB Student Loan Deal

    A national structured finance trade group attacked a proposed Consumer Financial Protection Bureau lawsuit settlement with owners of $12 billion in securitized student loans late Tuesday, saying the federal court deal in Delaware could destabilize the industry and economy.

  • November 22, 2017

    Deals Rumor Mill: Bank of Sharjah, Penta Investments, Actis

    Two United Arab Emirates financial institutions could merge to create a single entity boasting about 50.6 billion dirhams, CEFC and Penta Investments are partnering on a bid for Time Warner’s Central European Media Enterprises, and Standard Chartered is nearing a sale of its real estate principal finance business.

  • November 22, 2017

    Real Estate Rumors: P3 Investments, Diamond Sinacori, Swire

    Florida developer P3 Investments has reportedly sold a development site for $20.5 million, Boston developer Diamond Sinacori is said to have purchased and subsequently sold a property in Duxbury, Massachusetts, and Swire has reportedly leased space in Miami to Interaudi Bank and KPMG.

  • November 22, 2017

    SEC Whistleblower Program Ain't Broke — So Don't 'Fix' It

    The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission’s whistleblower program, now entering its seventh year, is maturing and gaining momentum, according to an agency report released Nov. 17, and whistleblower attorneys say they hope the Trump administration recognizes its value by staying out of the SEC’s way.

  • November 21, 2017

    Ex-Swiss Banker Acquitted Of Helping US Tax Evaders

    A New York federal jury on Tuesday acquitted a former Swiss banker of what prosecutors alleged was a criminal conspiracy to help U.S. taxpayers hide millions of dollars in undeclared income in offshore bank accounts to dodge taxes.

  • November 21, 2017

    SEC Sues Long Island Town, Ex-Official For Securities Fraud

    The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission on Tuesday hit the Long Island town of Oyster Bay and its former top elected official with a securities fraud suit alleging that they concealed from investors the town’s indirect guarantees of more than $20 million in private loans to a local businessman who ran concessions and restaurants at town facilities.

  • November 21, 2017

    Wells Fargo’s Bid To Retry Case Must Be Denied, Feds Say

    Wells Fargo’s attempt to retry settled matters of law and fact relating to a tax refund claim should be denied out of hand because the bank did not meet rules governing post-trial arguments, the Department of Justice told a Minnesota federal judge Tuesday.

  • November 21, 2017

    Citibank To Pay $6.5M Over CFPB Student Loan Probe

    The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau said Tuesday that Citibank NA would pay a $2.75 million fine and refund $3.75 million to private student loan borrowers over accusations that it charged them excess fees and provided them with incorrect or insufficient information as far back as 2006.

  • November 21, 2017

    Puerto Rico Board Says Bond Insurer Can't Fight Fiscal Plan

    The federal board charged with guiding Puerto Rico through its watershed debt restructuring reasserted Tuesday that it must remain unfettered from bondholder litigation to certify fiscal budgeting plans for the territory and ultimately come up with debt readjustment proposals, tamping down complaints of alleged constitutional violations.

  • November 21, 2017

    2nd Circ. Revives Terror Victims’ Bid To Get $1.7B From Iran

    The Second Circuit on Tuesday revived a bid by families of the victims of the 1983 Beirut Marine Corps barracks bombing to collect $1.68 billion linked to Iran’s central bank, overturning an earlier decision that the money was beyond the reach of U.S. courts.

  • November 21, 2017

    'Willfulness' In Civil FBAR Cases Comes Down To The Facts

    A judge’s recent decision to let a pharmaceutical CEO escape civil penalties for failing to report his Swiss bank account doesn’t necessarily signal that courts could be a reliable counterweight against the IRS’ dwindling sympathy, tax specialists say, but instead highlights the fact-dependent approach for determining willful nondisclosure.

  • November 21, 2017

    Judge Suggests Anonymous Jury In Iran Sanctions Trial

    A New York federal judge on Tuesday suggested using an anonymous jury in the upcoming trial of Turkiye Halk Bankasi AS executive Mehmet Hakan Atilla on charges of scheming to dodge U.S. sanctions against Iran, following reports that “third parties” have contacted people involved in the case.

Expert Analysis

  • 2nd Circ. Significantly Weakens Cramdown Threat

    Michael Rosenthal

    By increasing the likelihood that a Chapter 11 debtor will be required to pay a market interest rate to cram down a plan on secured lenders, the Second Circuit's opinion in MPM Silicones clearly reduces a debtor's leverage in negotiations with secured creditors, say attorneys with Gibson Dunn & Crutcher LLP.

  • Make Way For The 'Unicorns'

    Lucy Endel Bassli

    By "unicorn" I don’t mean the next great tech startup with a valuation of $1 billion. I mean the new breed of lawyers realizing that there are better ways to get their day jobs done, says Lucy Endel Bassli, assistant general counsel leading the legal operations and contracting functions at Microsoft Corp.

  • Series

    Judging A Book: McConnell Reviews 'Unequal'

    Judge John McConnell

    As widespread claims of sexual misconduct continue to surface in the entertainment industry and beyond, a discussion of how judges treat workplace discrimination cases may be particularly timely. Here, U.S. District Judge John McConnell reviews the book "Unequal: How America’s Courts Undermine Discrimination Law," by professors Sandra Sperino and Suja Thomas.

  • Curing A Default: When Is It Too Late?

    Adam Wolk

    There remains some debate as to whether events of default can be cured in the absence of, or after the lapse of, an express cure period in credit agreements, and there is little judicial discussion on this specific scenario, say attorneys with Mayer Brown LLP.

  • Increased FARA Enforcement May Lie Ahead

    Daniel Pickard

    The indictment of Paul Manafort and Richard Gates on Monday brings into focus a federal statute not often employed by prosecutors. The Foreign Agents Registration Act, once a little-known law, is now front and center in the national media, say Daniel Pickard and Madeline Cohen of Wiley Rein LLP.

  • The Non-Arbitration Alternative To New York ADR

    Edmund O'Toole

    Corporate transactional attorneys drafting dispute resolution provisions in New York commercial agreements should consider using a provision that would require any dispute arising under the agreement to be determined in accordance with the NY Supreme Court’s Commercial Division and its rules applicable to accelerated adjudication actions, says Ed O’Toole of Venable LLP.

  • Congressional Forecast: November

    Richard Hertling

    After months of talk, speculation and behind-the-scenes negotiations, the Republican tax reform proposal is expected to be released to the public this week. The stakes surrounding it are high; failure to pass the bill could put at risk Republican control of Congress in the 2018 elections, say Richard Hertling and Kaitlyn McClure of Covington & Burling LLP.

  • A 1st Impression Of The Manafort And Gates Indictment

    Harry Dixon

    Following the indictment of Paul Manafort and Richard Gates on Monday, attorney Harry Dixon of Taylor English Duma LLP discusses some immediate takeaways — including the possibility of a presidential pardon. While pardons are generally granted after a conviction, there is a historic outlier.

  • Financial Crisis Anniversary

    A Crisis Caused By Housing Policies, Not Lack Of Regulation

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    Supporters of the Dodd-Frank Act regularly claim that any change or reform of that law will open the U.S. economy to another financial crisis. This view is based on the fallacious idea that the crisis 10 years ago was the result of insufficient regulation of banks, says Peter Wallison, a senior fellow at the American Enterprise Institute and a dissenting member of the Financial Crisis Inquiry Commission.

  • Roundup

    Making Pro Bono Work

    Pro Bono Thumbnail

    In this series, attorneys explore the challenges and rewards of pro bono volunteering in the legal profession.