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California

  • August 13, 2018

    San Diego Beats Monsanto Water Pollution Counterclaims

    Monsanto Co. lost a bid to flip a lawsuit over its alleged pollution of the San Diego Bay by blaming it on the city’s stormwater system when a California federal judge found that the company didn’t have standing to bring counterclaims because it suffered no direct injury from the contamination.

  • August 13, 2018

    Cozen O'Connor Hires New Head For Calif. Franchise Practice

    Cozen O'Connor has hired the former chair of Snell & Wilmer LLP’s franchise services group to work from its Los Angeles office, where she will head up the firm’s global franchise practice.

  • August 13, 2018

    Judge Rips Tata's 'Hail Mary' Bid In Discrimination Suit

    A California federal judge on Friday rebuffed Tata Consultancy Services Ltd.’s attempt to chop away at a class action accusing the information technology company of discriminating against non-South Asian employees, calling it "a Hail Mary effort at limiting the scope of relief" months before trial.

  • August 13, 2018

    Dutch Telecom Says $36M Contract Row Must Be Arbitrated

    An approximately $36 million lawsuit accusing the Dutch telecom Veon Ltd. of fraud in connection with an underlying contract with California-based SteppeChange LLC to help modernize Veon's business practices belongs before a U.K. arbitrator, Veon told a California federal court Friday.

  • August 13, 2018

    Electronics Co. Says $1.4M Supply Row Belongs In Court

    A Hong Kong manufacturer of wireless audio system, mobile app and "internet of things" solutions has urged a California federal court not to force it to arbitrate its $1.4 million dispute stemming from a supply agreement with a Nevada-based electronics supplier, saying the parties' agreements call for settling disputes in district court. 

  • August 13, 2018

    9th Circ. Nixes Suit Over Frozen Burger Hydrogenated Oil

    A San Diego woman can’t sue a maker of frozen foods for putting partially hydrogenated oil in its microwaveable burger snacks, the Ninth Circuit has ruled, affirming a lower court’s decision that found she had failed to establish the practice was unfair or unlawful.

  • August 13, 2018

    Warner Media Wants Out Of Benefits Suit Over HIV/AIDS Meds

    Warner Media LLC urged a California federal judge to toss a suit over a program that requires HIV/AIDS patients to get their specialty medication only at a CVS pharmacy or by mail order, arguing that the patients couldn’t sue for a benefit — the choice of pharmacy — that was not provided in the company's health plan.

  • August 13, 2018

    Glycine Exporter Can't Dodge $11M Smuggling Scheme Claim

    A California federal judge struck down a food additive exporter's attempt to throw out claims saying it had smuggled glycine into the U.S. from China without paying more than $11 million in required duties, calling the exporter's use of the Fifth Amendment "both a sword and shield."

  • August 13, 2018

    State Farm Sues Amazon Over Exploding Vape Battery

    Insurer State Farm has sued Amazon and another company allegedly responsible for making a vape battery that caused a $400,000 fire in the house of one of its policyholders, according to a lawsuit removed to California federal court on Friday.

  • August 13, 2018

    Crypto Investor's Suit Must Stay In Federal Court

    A California federal judge on Friday refused to remand a putative securities class action brought by an investor in the cryptocurrency Ripple to state court, finding that the investor’s request to remand the suit under the Securities Act of 1933 goes too far.

  • August 13, 2018

    9th Circ. Says Witness Tampering Isn't 'Moral Turpitude'

    The Ninth Circuit held Friday that a state witness-tampering conviction should not preclude a Mexican immigrant from halting his deportation, finding that the crime does not constitute "moral turpitude" under the Immigration and Nationality Act.

  • August 10, 2018

    How The Legal Industry Lets Down Lawyers With Disabilities

    The dissolution of a five-year-old bar group marks the latest setback for disabled attorneys, who often find little support while navigating an inhospitable industry. This is the first article in a special report on disability inclusion in the legal industry.

  • August 10, 2018

    Gaining Access: Disabled Lawyers Share Their Stories

    In a series of interviews, lawyers tell Law360 how even well-intentioned professors can create barriers, how inclusivity can help a firm’s litigation prowess, and how “inspirational” can be a dirty word. This article is part of our special report on disability inclusion in the legal industry.

  • August 10, 2018

    Claims Processor Wants Out Of Benefits Suit Alleging Fraud

    The insurance claim-processing company Allied Benefit Systems Inc. told a California judge on Thursday that it shouldn’t be a party to a proposed class action against a chain of shuttered Southern California rehabilitation centers accused of stealing from its employees under the guise of funding a benefit plan.

  • August 10, 2018

    Business Groups Take Up Fight To Amend Calif. Privacy Law

    More than three dozen business groups from the tech, retail, health, banking and other sectors are pushing California lawmakers working on making "technical" changes to a hastily enacted landmark privacy law to address some of the more "unworkable" aspects of the statute and to extend the compliance deadline. 

  • August 10, 2018

    Investor Hits Tesla, Musk With Fraud Claims Over Tweet

    An investor hit Tesla Inc. and its founder Elon Musk with a proposed securities fraud class action Friday in California federal court, claiming they tried to pump up stock prices by proclaiming plans to take the company private — without having the more than $71 billion privatizing would require.

  • August 10, 2018

    Oracle Slapped With Securities Fraud Suit After Stock Drop

    Investors filed a proposed securities fraud class action Friday against Oracle in California federal court, holding the technology giant responsible for a one-day stock price plunge of 9.4 percent and alleging the company’s cloud revenues were driven by unsustainable “coercive” sales tactics.

  • August 10, 2018

    Mexican Treat Maker Infringed Rival's TMs, DC Circ. Holds

    The D.C. Circuit on Friday affirmed a D.C. federal court’s ruling that a Mexico-based maker of a hand-held frozen snack infringed the trademarks of a California-based maker of the treats featuring a girl dressed in indigenous clothing and that the California company did not infringe any rights held by its rival.

  • August 10, 2018

    Qualcomm Fights 'Unprecedented' Class Cert. In Chip Row

    Chipmaker Qualcomm has urged a California federal court not to certify a class of smartphone buyers suing the manufacturer for forcing companies like Apple and Samsung into paying high royalty rates that were allegedly then passed on to the public, arguing the class of 250 million people is unfeasible and "unprecedented." 

  • August 10, 2018

    Woodbridge Creditors Object To Claim Assignment Plan

    A group of noteholders of the Woodbridge Group of Companies LLC says the debtor’s proposed plan disclosure statement is impermissible because it would seek to solicit creditors with potential class claims relating to a Ponzi scheme run by the debtor to assign those claims to a plan litigation trust.

Expert Analysis

  • Series

    Clerking For Ginsburg: A Superhero Supreme

    Burden Walker

    As a clerk for Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, my job was to mirror my boss’ views and values in everything I did. Years later, I find that I am still striving to live up to the values Justice Ginsburg instilled in me, as both a lawyer and a spouse, says Burden Walker, an assistant U.S. attorney for the District of Maryland.

  • Calif. Courts Say Schools Must Protect Students

    Brian Kabateck

    Almost two decades after the Columbine shooting, we still suffer from attacks committed by obviously troubled individuals already on school officials’ or law enforcement’s radar. Recent rulings by California courts have held that schools have an affirmative duty to take reasonable steps to protect students, say Brian Kabateck and Joana Fang of Kabateck Brown Kellner LLP.

  • Why Bristol-Myers Applies To Absent Class Members: Part 3

    Brian Troyer

    Since the U.S. Supreme Court's Bristol-Myers Squibb decision, some courts have acknowledged that class certification is a form of joinder like traditional joinder, even while arguing that they do not need independent jurisdiction over class members’ claims. The irrational results speak for themselves, says Brian Troyer of Thompson Hine LLP.

  • Series

    Clerking For Ginsburg: 4 RBG Lessons On Having It All

    Rachel Wainer Apter

    Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg is everything she is cracked up to be​ — f​eminist icon​, brilliant jurist​, fierce dissenter. She is also an incredible boss, mentor and friend.​ ​Her advice has shaped how I have tried to balance building a career and ​raising children, says Rachel Wainer Apter, counsel to the New Jersey attorney general.

  • Calif. Employer's Guide To Tracking Off-The-Clock Tasks

    Elizabeth Arnold

    The California Supreme Court's recent ruling in Troester v. Starbucks means that all work time may be considered compensable. Elizabeth Arnold and Chester Hanvey of Berkeley Research Group LLC describe how to conduct a time and motion observation study in the context of this decision.

  • Sidewalks: The Next Mobility Frontier

    Michele Satterlund

    Sidewalks are an increasingly integral part of how people and goods are transported. While some jurisdictions are banning certain technologies from their sidewalks, others are recognizing the importance of expanding mobility options, says Michele Satterlund, an attorney with McGuireWoods LLP and lobbyist with McGuireWoods Consulting.

  • Why Bristol-Myers Applies To Absent Class Members: Part 2

    Brian Troyer

    Since the U.S. Supreme Court's Bristol-Myers Squibb v. Superior Court of California decision, some courts have chosen to treat a nonresident’s claim as within a court’s jurisdiction if the claimant is an absent class member, but not if the claimant is a named plaintiff. This has led to anomalous, irreconcilable outcomes, says Brian Troyer of Thompson Hine LLP.

  • Series

    Clerking For Ginsburg: How To Play The Long Game

    Arun Subramanian

    One of us was a clerk when Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg read her Ledbetter dissent from the bench, inviting Congress to act, and the other clerked a few years later, when RBG's prominently displayed copy of the Lilly Ledbetter Fair Pay Act served as a daily reminder that dissents are not just for show, say Arun Subramanian and Mark Musico of Susman Godfrey LLP.

  • What District Courts Are Saying About Admissibility Of IPR

    David Cavanaugh

    Given the frequency with which inter partes reviews are utilized in tandem with district court litigation to resolve patent disputes, the question that practitioners are starting to face with some regularity is whether, and to what extent, IPR decisions are admissible in district court litigation, say attorneys with WilmerHale.

  • 'Ban The Box' Turns 20: Decoding The Current Framework

    Stephen Woods

    Twenty years ago, the first state "ban the box" law crystallized a movement that, in time, would yield similar background check restrictions across the U.S. The result is a crisscrossing jumble of requirements, putting employers in a difficult position when dealing with applicants in different jurisdictions, say attorneys with Ogletree Deakins Nash Smoak & Stewart PC.