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California

  • January 15, 2019

    Rihanna Says Father Can't Stand Under Her Name's Umbrella

    Music icon Rihanna demanded on Tuesday that her father stop exploiting her name and brand to fraudulently make "millions of dollars" through his company Fenty Entertainment LLC, according to a lawsuit filed in California federal court.

  • January 15, 2019

    CWA Shift Pushes Calif., States Toward Stricter Water Regs

    California is close to finalizing new protections for its wetlands in response to the Trump administration's proposal to redefine which waters are subject to federal Clean Water Act jurisdiction, leading the way for like-minded states that could use their considerable authority to counteract a new definition they see as inadequate.

  • January 15, 2019

    Attys Say Wartime Law Can't Save One 'Fat Leonard' Case

    A defense lawyers' group has urged a San Diego judge to toss charges against a retired U.S. Navy captain caught up in the “Fat Leonard” bribery scandal, saying a law meant for wartime fraud shouldn't be used to preserve a case brought years too late.

  • January 15, 2019

    States, Tribes Back Swinomish In BNSF Appeal At 9th Circ.

    Three states and three tribes have urged the Ninth Circuit to uphold a lower court decision favoring the Swinomish Indian Tribal Community in its suit against BNSF Railway Co. over shipping crude oil across reservation land, saying federal law doesn’t pre-empt an easement pact and treaty rights are at stake.

  • January 15, 2019

    Insurer Wants Out Of Covering Depomed In Opioid Litigation

    Navigators Specialty Insurance Co. has asked a California federal court to affirm that it doesn't have to defend or indemnify Depomed Inc.'s successor in more than three dozen suits over the drugmaker's role in the opioid crisis, saying the policies don't cover opioid-related injuries and "allegedly intentional wrongdoing."

  • January 15, 2019

    States Urge 5th Circ. To Reverse ICWA Invalidation Order

    California, Massachusetts, Illinois and New Jersey have joined over a dozen states that are throwing support behind four tribes and the federal government as they seek to overturn a decision deeming the Indian Child Welfare Act unconstitutional, arguing that the statute provides critical protections for Native American children and their families.

  • January 15, 2019

    4th Circ. Hands Saveri Firm Win In $1.2M Legal Fees Battle

    Former Lieff Cabraser Heimann & Bernstein LLP attorney Joseph Saveri's firm doesn't have to pay another plaintiffs firm a $1.2 million referral fee out of his score from settlements in titanium dioxide price-fixing litigation, the Fourth Circuit ruled Monday, finding he'd never agreed to shell out the sum.

  • January 15, 2019

    2 Companies Join IPO Pipeline With Filings Totaling $47M

    An Israeli medical device company and a California-based maker of animated television commercials joined the pipeline for initial public offerings Monday with filings totaling $47 million, despite a lengthening government shutdown that makes it uncertain when the deals will price.

  • January 15, 2019

    Blank Rome Can Arbitrate Ex-Dickstein Partners' $4M Suit

    A Los Angeles judge told a group of former Dickstein Shapiro LLP partners Tuesday they must arbitrate claims that Blank Rome LLP mischaracterized its hire of more than 100 lawyers from the now-defunct Dickstein as an asset sale, rather than a merger, to avoid paying the former partners $4 million.

  • January 15, 2019

    Cloud Data Co. Rubrik Nabs $261M In Series E Funding Round

    Cloud data management company Rubrik on Tuesday said it pocketed $261 million in a Series E funding round that boosted the Palo Alto, California-based company’s value to $3.3 billion.

  • January 15, 2019

    Truck Body Maker Tries To Nix Workers' Rest Break Suit

    A truck body manufacturer accused in a proposed class action of failing to provide employees with required work breaks contended in California federal court Monday the suit should be tossed, saying just because employees must stay on-premises, it does not mean that their 10-minute rest periods under state labor laws are being violated.

  • January 15, 2019

    USCIS Breached Asylum Seeker's Confidentiality: 9th Circ.

    The Ninth Circuit has revived asylum claims made by a Kenyan citizen who claimed she escaped genital mutilation, holding that by uncovering through a third-party source that a piece of her evidence was forged, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services violated her confidentiality and may have put her at further risk.

  • January 14, 2019

    Nissan, Driver Agree To Mediate Defective Sunroof Suit

    Nissan North America Inc. and a consumer in a potential class action accusing the carmaker of selling vehicles with defective sunroofs agreed Monday to mediate the case, just months after a California federal judge denied Nissan's attempt to compel arbitration.

  • January 14, 2019

    Comcast Sued Again Over DVR Tech In TiVo IP Battle

    A TiVo Corp. unit filed new patent infringement allegations Monday in California federal court over the digital video recording technology in Comcast Corp.'s set-top boxes, despite the Patent Trial and Appeal Board finding related patents to be invalid.

  • January 14, 2019

    BakerHostetler Adds Business Pro From Payne & Fears

    BakerHostetler announced Monday that it picked up a business and employment law veteran from Payne & Fears LLP, making him the latest addition to BakerHostetler’s Costa Mesa, California, office.

  • January 14, 2019

    NYSE Fines Wedbush, Founder $1M For Unsupervised Trades

    Wedbush Securities Inc. and co-founder Edward Wedbush will pay a combined $1 million to the regulatory arm of the New York Stock Exchange to end claims the company’s leader of 64 years worked the trading desk without oversight.

  • January 14, 2019

    Feds Can't Force Biometric Use To Unlock Phones: Judge

    A California federal judge has ruled that law enforcement may not compel suspects to unlock devices such as smartphones with biometric identifiers, including fingerprint or iris scans, calling the practice unconstitutional.

  • January 14, 2019

    Allergan's Attack On Drug Compounding Falls Flat

    A California federal judge has rejected Allergan Inc.’s high-stakes effort to make many drug compounding activities unlawful, saying he will defer to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s decision to allow the activities.

  • January 14, 2019

    Biologist Found J&J Talc In Dying Woman's Tissue, Jury Hears

    A cell biologist took the stand Monday in a California jury trial over allegations that Johnson & Johnson talcum-made baby powder contained asbestos that caused a dying woman’s cancer, testifying that the woman's lung tissue contains talc, which he believes came from J&J's products.

  • January 14, 2019

    HP Unit Settles Mid-Trial In Suit Over $17M Software Deals

    Hewlett-Packard Co. subsidiary Autonomy Inc. agreed Monday to settle allegations it failed to deliver software that its former reseller MicroTechnologies Inc. had paid the British software company $16.5 million to back, abruptly ending a California federal jury trial over the contract dispute.

Expert Analysis

  • 7 Questions To Add To Your Lateral Partner Questionnaire

    Howard Rosenberg

    Law firms should redesign the vetting process for lateral candidates so it directly addresses sexual harassment and assault issues, says Howard Rosenberg of Decipher.

  • Top 10 Employer Resolutions For 2019

    Allegra Lawrence-Hardy

    As 2019 begins, many companies await answers to several pending employment law questions. Allegra Lawrence-Hardy and Bonnie Burke of Lawrence & Bundy LLC review the most pertinent issues employers should watch this year.

  • NY’s High Court Further Clarifies RMBS Legal Landscape

    Christopher Malloy

    In the past year, the New York Court of Appeals heard four significant cases addressing contractual remedies and timeliness of lawsuits concerning residential mortgage-backed securities — and has agreed to hear at least two more. The court's decisions in these cases will serve as useful guideposts, say attorneys with Skadden Arps Slate Meagher & Flom LLP.

  • Asylum Case Exemplifies Executive Branch Overreach

    Steven Gordon

    Although there are shortcomings in some portions of the Ninth Circuit’s recent opinion in East Bay Sanctuary Covenant v. Trump, they do not affect its central conclusion that the administration's new asylum policy is legally flawed, says Steven Gordon of Holland & Knight LLP.

  • Q&A

    A Chat With Reed Smith Chief Marketing Officer Sadie Baron

    Sadie Baron

    In this monthly series, Amanda Brady of Major Lindsey & Africa interviews management from top law firms about the increasingly competitive business environment. Here we feature Sadie Baron, chief marketing officer at Reed Smith LLP.

  • 6 Advertising Law Trends To Watch In 2019

    Jason Gordon

    In the world of advertising last year, the recurring theme appeared to be honesty. With the lid pried away to expose how companies have been studying their customers, those customers have begun studying the companies in return, say Jason Gordon and Andrew Levad of Reed Smith LLP.

  • When Civil Litigants Face Criminal Proceedings

    Paul Chan

    A civil defendant implicated in a criminal investigation faces a difficult choice: Defend the civil case and waive the Fifth Amendment right against self-incrimination, or invoke the privilege, but risk hobbling the defense of the civil case, say Paul Chan and Fanxi Wang of Bird Marella Boxer Wolpert Nessim Drooks Lincenberg & Rhow PC.

  • 'Flexible Work' Makes Freelancing More Viable In BigLaw

    Elizabeth Black

    The rise of remote work capabilities and advances in technology are making flexible, freelance legal work a more accessible career option for corporate attorneys, say Elizabeth Black and Sara Eng of InCloudCounsel.

  • How Courts Have Applied Cray Patent Venue Test

    Gregory Herrman

    Since the Federal Circuit's 2017 Cray decision established a three-prong test for finding a “regular and established place of business,” courts have been reluctant to find proper venue without a physical building in the district that is owned or leased by the defendant, say Gregory Herrman and Jonathan England of Blank Rome LLP.

  • Opinion

    A Call To Permit Judicial Substitution In MDL Proceedings

    Doug Smith

    While several proposed changes to multidistrict litigation procedures may be warranted and appropriate, consideration should be given to a modest modification of the judicial selection process, says Doug Smith of Kirkland & Ellis LLP.