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California

  • August 14, 2018

    How One Firm Moved The Needle On Disability Inclusion

    This global law firm has recently focused on creating opportunities for people with disabilities across its ranks, and its efforts are already showing results.

  • August 14, 2018

    Woodbridge Says Creditor Claims Aren't Backed By Liens

    Bankrupt real estate venture Woodbridge Group of Cos. LLC on Tuesday told a Delaware bankruptcy court that an adversary complaint lodged by noteholders in its Chapter 11 case should be tossed because the noteholders don't have any liens on the property at the center of the dispute.

  • August 14, 2018

    Calif. Privacy Law Isn't End Of The World, Lawmakers Told

    A coalition of consumer advocacy groups shot back at the business community's initial efforts to scale back a recently enacted California privacy law, arguing that "the sky is not falling, as industry suggests" and urging state lawmakers to focus on "strictly technical cleanup" work for now. 

  • August 14, 2018

    Investors Say PayPal Covered Up Data Breach Of Acquired Co.

    Shareholders trying to persuade a federal judge in California not to dismiss their class action claiming PayPal hid a serious data breach are equating the company’s initial public portrayal of the breach as a “security vulnerability” to being “a little pregnant.”

  • August 14, 2018

    LL Bean Customer’s Warranty Suit ‘Makes No Sense’: Judge

    A California federal judge on Tuesday tossed with leave to amend a proposed class action that claims new limits on L.L. Bean Inc.’s century-old lifetime warranty violate consumer protection statutes, saying during a hearing the allegations are “hugely hypothetical” and the suit “makes no sense.”

  • August 14, 2018

    Coachella Seeks Quick TM Win In Suit Against 'Filmchella'

    Popular music festival Coachella asked a California federal court Tuesday to hand it a partial win in its trademark infringement suit against the organizer of a new movie festival called Filmchella, saying it owns valid protectable trademarks that its rival intentionally copied for a “confusingly similar” use without authorization.

  • August 14, 2018

    AT&T Customers Win Cert. In Roaming Fees Class Action

    A California federal judge certified a class of AT&T customers who accused the company of misleading them about overseas roaming fees, finding in the long-running suit that, though the customers had gotten information from different sources, their claims could be heard as a group.

  • August 14, 2018

    Insurers Needn't Cover Nutiva's False Ad Suit Defense

    A California federal judge on Tuesday ruled that a trio of insurers have no duty to defend or indemnify Nutiva Inc. in a putative class action claiming the company misbrands its coconut oil as healthy, finding that the terms of Nutiva’s insurance policies are not met because the underlying suit does not allege the company engaged in accidental conduct.

  • August 14, 2018

    SEC Bans Oil Exec Accused Of ICO Fraud From Penny Stocks

    The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission on Tuesday barred the founder of an oil and gas company from serving in leadership positions and participating in penny stock offerings after making alleged misstatements related to an initial coin offering.

  • August 14, 2018

    DOJ Taps Ex-AG Mukasey To Monitor Bayer-Monsanto Deal

    A D.C. district judge on Tuesday appointed former U.S. Attorney General and district court chief judge Michael B. Mukasey to serve as the monitoring trustee for the U.S. Department of Justice agreement that allowed Bayer AG's planned $62 billion purchase of Monsanto Co. to proceed.

  • August 14, 2018

    Atty's 'Thumbs-Up' On Monster Deal Isn't Binding: Calif. Panel

    A California appeals court said Monday that an attorney didn’t breach the terms of his clients’ wrongful death settlement with Monster Energy Co. by talking to a reporter about the deal, finding that the attorney had merely given his “professional thumbs-up” by signing the contract and he wasn’t a party to it.

  • August 14, 2018

    US Can't Ease Mexican Import Ban Protecting Porpoise: CIT

    The U.S. Court of International Trade on Tuesday rejected the Trump administration’s bid to limit the scope of a recent ban on seafood imported from Mexico caught with an all-encompassing net that kills the world's smallest and most endangered porpoise, affirming the ban is “effective immediately.”

  • August 14, 2018

    Uber Taps Ex-NSA GC To Run Security After Breach Fallout

    Uber said Tuesday that it has tapped Matt Olsen, the former director of the National Counterterrorism Center and general counsel at the National Security Agency, to lead its security team as the company tries to rebuild its reputation after its botched handling of a data breach.

  • August 14, 2018

    NCAA, Players Can Use O'Bannon Evidence In Antitrust Trial

    The California federal judge who will try claims the NCAA illegally prevents athletes from being paid beyond their scholarships said Monday she will admit evidence from the landmark O'Bannon case, overriding multiple objections from both the sports body and the students.

  • August 14, 2018

    Woodbridge Noteholder Group Slams Del. Ch. 11 Disclosures

    A group of Woodbridge Group noteholders on Monday urged the Delaware bankruptcy court to reject Woodbridge's Chapter 11 plan disclosures, saying they don't take into account the potentially tens of millions in secured and administrative claims the noteholders say they hold.

  • August 14, 2018

    Most Of Southwest Passenger's Civil Rights Suit Survives

    A federal judge on Tuesday declined to toss all but one claim from a California man’s lawsuit alleging he was removed from a Southwest Airlines Co. plane solely for speaking in Arabic, finding that the complaint adequately alleged discrimination by the airline and one of its employees.

  • August 14, 2018

    Tesla's Latham-Guided Panel To Study Take-Private Scenarios

    Tesla Inc. said Tuesday that its board of directors has formed a special committee, advised by Latham & Watkins LLP, that will evaluate any going-private proposals for the electric carmaker in the wake of a recent tweet by CEO Elon Musk that signaled his desire to take the company private.

  • August 14, 2018

    Loeb Taps 6 Ex-Cooley Attys To Run New SF Office

    Loeb & Loeb LLP announced Tuesday that it’s opened a new office in downtown San Francisco, which will be run by six trusts and estates lawyers the firm nabbed from Cooley LLP.

  • August 14, 2018

    Calif. Biz Owner Cops To Violating Syrian Sanctions

    A California businessman pled guilty on Monday to conspiring to export American tactical gear to Syria, a violation of U.S. economic sanctions against the country.

  • August 14, 2018

    Will Calif. Spark Movement On Outside Investment In Law?

    A hard look in California at the role nonlawyers can play in the delivery of legal services could prompt a ripple effect in the U.S. if the state takes the bold step of allowing other professionals to invest in law firms and claim an ownership stake.

Expert Analysis

  • Liability Insurance Policies May Cover PAGA Lawsuits

    Shaun Crosner

    Although some employment practices liability and directors and officers liability insurers might not acknowledge it readily, California employers may be entitled to broad coverage for Private Attorneys General Act lawsuits — including a defense and indemnity for PAGA settlements and judgments, says Shaun Crosner of Pasich LLP.

  • Series

    Clerking For Ginsburg: In Pursuit Of Precision

    Trevor Morrison

    As clerks for Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, we learned early on that, when preparing a memorandum or draft opinion, it was essential to present any opposing argument in its strongest possible light. There is a lesson here for today's public debates, says Trevor Morrison, dean of NYU Law School.

  • Series

    Clerking For Ginsburg: My RBG Guide To Judging

    Goodwin Liu

    I clerked for Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg before the days of RBG bobbleheads and “You Can’t Spell Truth Without Ruth” T-shirts. I had no idea I would become a judge, and I feel lucky every day that I had the chance to learn from her, says California Supreme Court Justice Goodwin Liu.

  • What Lawyers Must Know About Financial Elder Abuse Claims

    Geoffrey Gold

    Recent litigation surrounding Marvel Comics icon Stan Lee has drawn attention to the issue of financial elder abuse. Geoffrey Gold of Ervin Cohen & Jessup LLP offers practice pointers on using the provisions of the California Elder Abuse Act to protect senior clients who may have been victims of financial fraud.

  • Gap Between Calif. And Federal Wage And Hour Law Grows

    Kirstin Muller

    In its recent decision in Troester v. Starbucks, the California Supreme Court unanimously rejected application of the federal Fair Labor Standards Act’s “de minimis” doctrine to California wage and hour law. The ruling changes the state's employment law landscape in important ways, says Kirstin Muller of Hirschfeld Kraemer LLP.

  • Series

    Clerking For Ginsburg: 4 Things I Learned

    Judge John Owens

    A lot has changed since I clerked for Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg 20 years ago. At that time, I had hair and no wife. I also thought I knew everything — but working for the justice made me realize very quickly that I actually knew very little, says Ninth Circuit Judge John Owens.

  • Clarifying 'Moral Turpitude' In The Immigration Context

    Scott Wilkinson

    In Rocio Aurora Martinez de Ryan v. Sessions, a case out of Nevada involving fraudulent documents, the Ninth Circuit recently waded back into the arena of defining what constitutes a crime of "moral turpitude" — which can render one inadmissible to the United States. Based on its opinion, the court appears to be willing to adopt an “I know it when I see it” standard, says Scott Wilkinson of Erickson Immigration Group.

  • Looking For Answers On Call-In Scheduling In Calif.

    Kalcheva_Desi_01.jpg

    After nearly four years of litigation in California federal court, Samantha Jones v. Abercrombie & Fitch is on the cusp of settlement. But depending on whether it's approved, the issue of call-in time as reporting time for purposes of employee compensation in California may still remain unanswered, says Desi Kalcheva of Paul Plevin Sullivan & Connaughton LLP.

  • California’s Consumer Privacy Act Vs. GDPR

    Grant Davis-Denny

    While the drafters of the California Consumer Privacy Act looked to Europe’s General Data Protection Regulation as a model, they did not parrot the GDPR’s language, adopt all of its requirements or limit themselves to the GDPR’s provisions. There are some key similarities and differences to keep in mind, says Grant Davis-Denny of Munger Tolles & Olson LLP.

  • Series

    Clerking For Ginsburg: The Equality Lessons

    Margo Schlanger

    In 1993, Ruth Bader Ginsburg was confirmed to the U.S. Supreme Court, and I began my two-year clerkship with her. In her first opinion as a justice, and in dozens since, Justice Ginsburg reminded us how the law needs to operate if equality is to be a reality, says Margo Schlanger, a professor at the University of Michigan Law School.