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California

  • August 10, 2018

    Calif. Bank Prices $47.7M IPO On Low End Of Range

    The Los Angeles-based holding company for Pacific City Bank announced Thursday night that it would be pricing its initial public offering of nearly 2.4 million shares at $20 per share, the low end of a previously announced $20 to $22 range, for a total offering size of $47.7 million.

  • August 10, 2018

    'Filmchella' Organizers Want TTAB Review Of TM Row

    Organizers behind an upstart movie festival called Filmchella have urged a California federal court to stay trademark litigation brought against them by popular music festival Coachella, saying a pause should be placed on proceedings pending review by the U.S. Trademark Trial and Appeal Board.

  • August 10, 2018

    Krazy Glue Beats Class Bid In Slack-Fill Packaging Suit

    A California federal judge denied class certification in a suit alleging the makers of Krazy Glue are duping buyers with excessive empty space in its packaging, saying the lead plaintiff had failed to show the alleged deception cost him or anyone else money.

  • August 10, 2018

    EPA Must Regulate Stormwater Pollution In LA, Court Rules

    Environmental groups persuaded a California federal judge to rule Thursday that the Environmental Protection Agency had made an “arbitrary and capricious” decision when it refused to require permits for polluted stormwater runoff in the Los Angeles area, which the groups said was impairing two waterways.

  • August 10, 2018

    Feds Fight Ex-Barclays FX Trader’s Bid To Toss HP Case

    Prosecutors pushed back on an ex-Barclays trader’s motion to dismiss the criminal “front running” case against him Friday, arguing that the question of whether he had a duty to act in the best interests of Hewlett Packard Co. in a £6 billion foreign currency options transaction can only be determined by a jury.

  • August 10, 2018

    Monsanto Owes $289M In Landmark Roundup Cancer Trial

    A California jury held Friday that Monsanto’s Roundup and Ranger Pro herbicides contributed to a school groundskeeper’s lymphoma and slapped the company with a combined $289 million in compensatory and punitive damages in a landmark suit against the agricultural giant, which has denied links between its herbicides and cancer for decades.

  • August 10, 2018

    Workers Fight To Keep Visa Fraud Suit Against Tesla

    A pair of workers on Friday defended their False Claims Act and Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act suit alleging that Tesla Inc., its contractor Eisenmann Corp., and others knowingly participated in a visa fraud scheme to illegally import low-cost foreign labor for Tesla’s manufacturing plant and other automakers’ job sites.

  • August 10, 2018

    Hacker Stole FIFA Video Game Virtual Currency, Feds Say

    A 25-year-old Serbian man allegedly hacked into Electronic Arts Inc.'s computer network and stole the video game company’s licenses and in-game currency for its popular soccer game FIFA 2018, according to court documents filed in California federal court.

  • August 10, 2018

    Consumers Seek OK On New Kimpton Data Breach Settlement

    A proposed class of consumers that sued Kimpton Hotel & Restaurant Group LLC over a 2016 security breach has handed a California federal court a new version of its settlement, saying the settlement amount is more than enough to cover all claimants and the claim form is easier to complete.

  • August 10, 2018

    Apollo Global, HR Co. Cut $3M Deal In WARN Act Suit

    Apollo Global Management LLC announced it will pay the majority of a $3 million deal to settle a putative class action alleging that it and a human resources company failed to properly warn about 1,000 employees of layoffs at California locations of Apollo's now-defunct party rentals company.

  • August 10, 2018

    Real Estate Rumors: Kavanagh, Splunk, Morgan Stanley

    Kavanagh Advisory Group is reportedly planning to build a four-story Boston Seaport research building, software firm Splunk is reportedly leasing 284,000 square feet in San Jose and Morgan Stanley is said to have loaned $63 million for a recent Chicago-area office complex purchase.

  • August 9, 2018

    Studios' Snub Shows Conspiracy, VidAngel Tells 9th Circ.

    VidAngel Inc. urged the Ninth Circuit to revive the company's antitrust counterclaims in the copyright infringement suit brought by Disney, Lucasfilm and other movie studios, saying during oral arguments Thursday that the refusal of all the major studios to play ball with the family-friendly streaming service supports an inference of a conspiracy among them.

  • August 9, 2018

    Calif. Panel Revives Olympic Hopeful's Win Against Atty

    A California state appeals court said in a published opinion that a lower court was wrong to throw out a jury verdict against an attorney over his representation of an Olympic-hopeful athlete in a dispute with USA Swimming, restoring the verdict and directing the court to notify the state bar of the lawyer's conduct.

  • August 9, 2018

    Electric Car Startup Says Rival's No-Poach Terms Are Unlawful

    Electric vehicle startup EVelozcity sued Faraday & Future on Thursday in California state court, calling a contract term its competitor imposes to prevent departing employees from encouraging colleagues to also leave for another company “illegally restrictive.”

  • August 9, 2018

    Enviros Point 9th Circ. To Pipeline Ruling In Wind Farm Appeal

    A conservation group told the Ninth Circuit on Wednesday that a recent appellate court decision vacating federal approvals for portions of the Mountain Valley pipeline supported its challenge to the Bureau of Indian Affairs’ assent to a lease between a wind farm developer and a California tribe.

  • August 9, 2018

    UnitedHealthcare Beneficiaries Seek Cert. In Coverage Suit

    A proposed class of beneficiaries accusing UnitedHealth Group Inc. and two subsidiaries of having a policy that improperly denied claims for prosthetic devices in violation of federal benefits law asked a California federal judge to certify a class of nearly 1,900 members, arguing that they fulfilled the statutory requirements.

  • August 9, 2018

    Mass. AG Launches Probe Into LendingClub’s Ad Practices

    LendingClub Corp. said in a regulatory filing Wednesday that the Massachusetts attorney general is investigating the San Francisco-based peer-to-peer lending company's advertising and disclosure practices to consumers in that state.

  • August 9, 2018

    9th Circ. Nixes Drivers' Challenge To Seattle Union Law

    The Ninth Circuit ruled Thursday that a group of independent drivers who contract with the ride-hailing apps Uber and Lyft cannot pursue a challenge to a Seattle ordinance that lets for-hire drivers form quasi-unions, saying the harms they purportedly would suffer are too speculative for their claims to be heard.

  • August 9, 2018

    Bay Area Multifamily Housing Project Scores $122M Loan

    California-based developer Anton Development Co. locked up $121.7 million in financing for a multifamily housing development and retail space under construction north of San Jose, according to an announcement Thursday by Holliday Fenoglio Fowler LP, which arranged the deal.

  • August 9, 2018

    Atty Fees In $5M Chinese Award Row Must Also Be Arbitrated

    A California federal judge has rebuffed a bid for attorneys' fees after confirming a more than $5 million arbitral award against a nutraceutical company, which was issued to two individuals following a dispute over a share transfer, saying the pair must heed the terms of their own arbitration agreement.

Expert Analysis

  • Developments In State Data Breach Notification Laws

    Hanley Chew

    In the past year, Alabama, New Mexico and South Dakota became the final three states to enact data breach notification statutes, and several other states amended their existing data breach notification statutes. Three trends are evident in the new statutes, say ​​​​​​​Hanley Chew and Tyler Newby of Fenwick & West LLP.

  • Ensure All Relevant Parties Sign Arbitration Agreement

    Michael Cypers

    A California appellate court's decision in Benaroya v. Bruce Willis is one of several recent decisions teaching that if you want the ability to arbitrate against the key individuals in your counterparty, those individuals should be signatories to the arbitration clause in the underlying deal documents, say Michael Cypers and Michael Gerst of Glaser Weil Fink Howard Avchen & Shapiro LLP.

  • Biometrics And Geolocation Legislation: A Midyear Update

    Justin Kay

    In the first half of 2018, technology that determines where you are and who you are garnered significant attention. Less discussed are the legislative efforts underway in the federal government and in many states to regulate these emerging technologies, says Justin Kay of Drinker Biddle & Reath LLP.

  • Guest Feature

    Chris Dodd Talks Dodd-Frank, Nuremberg Trial, Hollywood

    Randy Maniloff

    Attorney Randy Maniloff recently sat down with former Sen. Christopher Dodd at his new office at Arnold & Porter in Washington, D.C. The goal? To discover things we might not know about the author of some of the most important legislation of the last few decades.

  • New Privacy Laws' Unintended Impact On Bankruptcy Sales

    Walt Sapronov

    When the next downturn occurs, bankruptcies and opportunities for investors to pick up distressed assets on the cheap will follow. Where those assets include customer lists or other personal information protected by new privacy laws in the EU and California, those sales will become more difficult, say Walt Sapronov and Paul Kouroupas of Sapronov & Associates PC.

  • What Kavanaugh's Writing Tells Us About His Personality

    Matthew Hall

    People with certain personality traits tend to use certain words. A computer analysis of Judge Brett Kavanaugh’s D.C. Circuit opinions reveals that he is highly extraverted, which means that he would be a prominent voice on the U.S. Supreme Court, says Matthew Hall, a professor at the University of Notre Dame.

  • Roundup

    Cities In Distress

    Cities in Distress

    Five years after the city of Detroit filed for Chapter 9 bankruptcy, experts look at the financial troubles of Chicago and other U.S. cities in this special series.

  • Opinion

    3 Pros, 3 Cons Of Litigation Finance

    Ralph Sutton

    An educated guess puts the number of new litigation funders launched in the past 18 months at 30 — an astonishing number, with more to come. Is this a blessing to our legal system or something more akin to tulip mania? Maybe both, says Ralph Sutton, founder and CEO of litigation funding firm Validity Finance LLC.

  • How Attorney Discipline Is Evolving In The #MeToo Era

    Bonnie Frost

    In March, the American Bar Association issued a manual to help legal employers and victims fight sexual harassment in the legal profession. While automatic disbarment for sexual misconduct with clients may have been considered too harsh a sanction almost a decade ago, it may be revisited in the current climate, say Bonnie Frost and Kristi Terranova of Einhorn Harris Ascher Barbarito & Frost PC.

  • California Decision Distorts Bank Liability Under FIRREA

    Ben Singer

    A California federal judge recently concluded in United States v. Bogucki that any action by a bank employee that incurs potential liability for the bank triggers the Financial Institutions Reform, Recovery, and Enforcement Act. This renders unwieldy the scope of banks’ potential FIRREA exposure, says Ben Singer of O'Melveny & Myers LLP.