California

  • February 15, 2018

    Golub Capital Sinks $270M Into Radiology Co.’s Calif. Growth

    Golub Capital said Thursday it will provide a $270 million loan to support private equity-backed Radiology Partners' overall growth and recent expansion into California with the company’s acquisition of a 99-physician practice in the state.

  • February 15, 2018

    A Chat With Hogan Lovells HR Chief Allison Friend

    In this monthly series, legal recruiting experts Amanda Brady and Amy Mallow of Major Lindsey & Africa interview law firm management from Am Law 200 firms about how they are navigating an increasingly competitive business environment. The second conversation is with Allison Friend, chief human resources officer for Hogan Lovells LLP.

  • February 14, 2018

    NuVasive Says Rival Hired Key Workers, Copied Spine System

    NuVasive Inc. alleged a competitor engaged in a coordinated effort to rip off its entire spinal surgery system, hiring former executives who worked on the technology and then devising a system that closely mimicked it, according to an infringement suit entered in California federal court Wednesday.

  • February 14, 2018

    Ugg Maker Says Walmart, Clothing Designer Selling Knockoffs

    Deckers Outdoor Corp., the company behind Ugg boots, sued Walmart Inc. and Reliable Knitting Works in California federal court on Wednesday, alleging they’ve infringed on Deckers’ trademark and patent by selling counterfeit versions of its “Bailey Button” boot.

  • February 14, 2018

    Uthe’s RICO Harm Theory New To Appeal, 9th Circ. Says

    Uthe Technology Corp. urged the Ninth Circuit on Wednesday to revive its Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act suit, arguing the semiconductor company suffered a direct harm when it was defrauded into selling a “thriving” subsidiary and prompting the judges to complain Uthe was raising a new injury theory for the first time on appeal.

  • February 14, 2018

    Ex-UCLA Doctor Seeks $16M As Gender Bias Trial Wraps

    A former UCLA oncologist asked a Los Angeles jury on Wednesday for nearly $16 million in her suit alleging she was retaliated against for complaining about gender-based discrimination, while the school’s governing body argued that she made her own decision to leave the program.

  • February 14, 2018

    Calif. Court OKs Doc's Injury Verdict, Nixes $2.9M Fees Award

    A California appeals court on Tuesday affirmed a jury’s decision to award a medical technician $225,000 in a suit accusing a doctor of sexual battery, but reversed a trial judge’s award of $2.9 million in attorneys’ fees, saying a doubling of fees may not have been fair.

  • February 14, 2018

    Venture Capitalist Sued For Alleged In-Flight Sex Battery

    A 29-year-old co-founder of tech companies hit a 73-year-old Silicon Valley venture capitalist with a sexual battery suit in California state court Wednesday, alleging that he groped her on a red-eye flight.

  • February 14, 2018

    Ford Gets Claims Trimmed In Faulty Screen Class Action

    With a May trial ahead on class claims alleging Ford Motor Co. sold vehicles with faulty touch screens to over 500,000 drivers, a California federal judge on Wednesday pared class claims for two states, leaving eight state classes and others in the litigation.

  • February 14, 2018

    Facing Punitive Damages, BofA Settles With Fired Worker

    Bank of America NA reached a confidential settlement late Tuesday night with a former client manager after a California federal jury found the bank had illegally blacklisted and defamed her, resolving the dispute before the jury could deliberate on the amount of punitive damages the bank would have to pay.

  • February 14, 2018

    9th Circ. Should Reverse Calif. DACA Injunction, Feds Say

    The Trump administration on Tuesday urged the Ninth Circuit to reverse a California federal court’s order that temporarily barred it from rescinding the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, arguing that it is an agency action that courts must defer to.

  • February 14, 2018

    Disney Sued Again Over Allegedly Ripping Off 'Zootopia'

    A production company whose copyright feud over The Walt Disney Co.'s film "Zootopia” was tossed by a California federal judge last year has hit the media giant with a contract suit in state court, claiming Disney breached an implied contract by allegedly stealing its story to create the animated hit.

  • February 14, 2018

    Fitbit Settles Trademark Suit With Alleged Counterfeiters

    Fitbit Inc. and several of the companies that it accused of selling counterfeit versions of its products asked a California federal judge Tuesday to rule that a confidential settlement between them is fair.

  • February 14, 2018

    Death Claim Against Hospital Too Late, Calif. Court Affirms

    A California appeals court has tossed a suit accusing a hospital of wrongful death, rejecting a family’s claims that because the hospital notified them that their son had died of stomach cancer when, in fact, he had actually died of a head injury caused by an in-hospital fall, it should be exempt from the six-month deadline to file suit.

  • February 14, 2018

    Warburg Pincus Leads Duetto's $80M Series D Raise

    Hospitality revenue services platform Duetto has raised $80 million in series D financing from a group of investors led by Warburg Pincus LLC funds, according to an announcement from San Francisco-based Duetto on Wednesday.

  • February 14, 2018

    Poultry Farm Seeks Sanctions For ‘Knowingly False’ Claims

    One of the largest poultry producers in the United States asked a California federal judge on Tuesday to dismiss a suit from three nonprofits, along with other sanctions, due to "salacious" and "outlandish" allegations made based on U.S. Department of Agriculture test data the company claims was knowingly misrepresented.

  • February 14, 2018

    Granite Construction Snaps Up Layne In $565M Deal

    Granite Construction Inc. said Wednesday it will take over water management, construction and drilling firm Layne Christensen Co. in a deal worth $565 million that will see California-headquartered Granite take a major leap in its water infrastructure capabilities.

  • February 14, 2018

    General Mills Buyers Fight To Preserve Labeling Row

    General Mills consumers accusing the company of misrepresenting its sugary cereals and bars as healthy urged a California federal court Tuesday to keep the proposed class action alive, saying the claims are not preempted and not based on puffery.

  • February 14, 2018

    Norwest Grabs $1.5B For Its Largest-Ever PE Fund

    Norwest Venture Partners said Wednesday its latest and largest-ever investment fund raised $1.5 billion from investors as the private equity firm continues to target companies in the consumer, enterprise and health care sectors.

  • February 13, 2018

    Passenger Claims Southwest Booted Him For Speaking Arabic

    A California man hit Southwest Airlines Co. with a civil rights suit in federal court Tuesday claiming that he was removed from a flight for speaking Arabic, even though he wasn't doing anything wrong.

Expert Analysis

  • Series

    What I Learned In My 1st Year: A Judge's Example

    M.C. Sungaila

    Law school taught me how to think like a lawyer, but the district court judge I clerked for my first year out of law school taught me how to be a lawyer. This was the gift she gave to all of her law clerks, in one form or another, says M.C. Sungaila of Haynes and Boone LLP.

  • Centers Of Influence Are Key To Small Law Firm Rainmaking

    Frank Carone

    In a national survey of 378 small law firms, partners ranked client referrals as the most important means of business development. Yet studies reveal that while professional services providers obtain most new clients from existing client referrals, their best new clients — the ones providing the largest pool of investable assets — overwhelmingly come from “centers of influence,” says Frank Carone, an executive partner at Abrams Fensterman.

  • FERC Ruling Smooths Path For Municipal Electric Systems

    Harvey Reiter

    Communities dissatisfied with their local utilities sometimes explore formation of their own municipally run electric systems, but usually face fierce resistance from the utilities they would displace. Municipalization can be a long road, but a recent ruling by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission may make the process easier, says Harvey Reiter of Stinson Leonard Street LLP.

  • Insurers' Broad Duty To Defend Employment Claims In Calif.

    Cheryl Sabnis

    The Ninth Circuit recently issued a long-awaited ruling in PHP Insurance Service v. Greenwich Insurance, bringing with it a helpful reminder to holders of employment practices liability insurance policies not to shy away from tendering employment claims to their insurers, says Cheryl Sabnis of King & Spalding LLP.

  • No Consensus On Conspiracy Theory Of Personal Jurisdiction

    Jack Figura

    Courts are divided — and the U.S. Supreme Court has yet to rule — on whether the conspiracy theory of personal jurisdiction is proper under due process requirements. But it is reasonable to expect that sooner or later the high court will narrow the permissible reach of this theory, says John P. “Jack” Figura of Norton Rose Fulbright.

  • Coverage For Montecito Claims: Flood Or Fire?

    Meka Moore

    The destruction caused in Montecito and other areas of Southern California earlier this year appears to have been caused by flood, mudslide and mudflow, which are excluded under most property insurance policies. However, there is potential for homeowners to assert that the damage was actually caused by the Thomas fire, say Meka Moore and Jennifer Revitz of Selman Breitman LLP.

  • How The Hospitality Industry Is Dealing With Tip Pool Regs

    Margaret Grover

    The hospitality industry has long relied on tips and service charges to augment wages paid to employees. The U.S. Department of Labor has proposed new regulations governing tip sharing, in part as a response to regulations it promulgated in 2011, which have resulted in a split between the federal circuits and a petition for certiorari in the U.S. Supreme Court, says Margaret Grover of Wendel Rosen Black & Dean.

  • Feature

    From Law Firm To Newsroom: An Interview With Bob Woodruff

    Randy Maniloff

    Lawyers who have left the traditional practice for perceived greener pastures are many. But the circumstances surrounding broadcast journalist Bob Woodruff’s departure are unique. Like none I’ve ever heard, says Randy Maniloff of White and Williams LLP.

  • Series

    Judging A Book: Kendall Reviews 'On The Jury Trial'

    Judge Virginia Kendall

    As someone who spent half her days last year on the bench presiding over trials, I often find the alarmist calls to revamp the jury trial system a tad puzzling — why is making trial lawyers better rarely discussed? Then along comes a refreshing little manual called "On the Jury Trial: Principles and Practices for Effective Advocacy," by Thomas Melsheimer and Judge Craig Smith, says U.S. District Judge Virginia Kendall of the Northe... (continued)

  • Back In The Shop With Encino Motorcars V. Navarro

    Michael Hepburn

    The U.S. Supreme Court recently heard arguments in Encino Motorcars v. Navarro, following the Ninth Circuit’s decision on remand. The case has become the legal equivalent of a “lemon” and the court seemed no closer to a decision than it was after Navarro’s first appearance at the Supreme Court in 2016, say attorneys with Eversheds Sutherland.