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California

  • June 12, 2018

    LeClairRyan Adds Employment Pair From Ogletree In LA

    LeClairRyan has announced it has landed a duo of labor and employment attorneys from Ogletree Deakins Nash Smoak & Stewart PC, saying the two have come on as partners in the firm’s Los Angeles office.

  • June 12, 2018

    Akerman Nabs Another Employment Vet With Ex-Ogletree Hire

    Akerman LLP strengthened its employment practice with a former Ogletree Deakins Nash Smoak & Stewart PC attorney with experience defending employers against class action claims and federal agencies, making her the sixth management-side employment attorney to join the firm’s Los Angeles office this year, the firm announced Monday.

  • June 12, 2018

    Real Estate Rumors: Zuo Hui, Howard Hughes, Gala Asher

    Chinese developer Zuo Hui is reportedly in late-stage talks to pay $1.56 billion for certain property assets in central Beijing, Howard Hughes Corp. is said to have bought a New York development site for $180 million, and developer Gala Asher is reportedly seeking to sell a Los Angeles mansion for $135 million, which would set an L.A. residential sales record.

  • June 12, 2018

    Feds Say Intent A Non-Issue In South Korean Bribe Case

    Prosecutors are seeking to shut down an appeal by a Korean earthquake researcher convicted of laundering bribes, telling the Ninth Circuit on Monday that the South Korean law he violated does not focus on a bribe-taker's intent in the same way U.S. laws do.

  • June 12, 2018

    GoPro Investors Seek Cert. In Undersupply, Defect Suit

    A proposed class of investors who say they overpaid for shares of GoPro Inc. because the company concealed shortages of its cameras and drones as well as a design defect asked a California federal court Monday for class certification.

  • June 12, 2018

    LabCorp Didn't Make 'Whistleblower' Break Law: Calif. Panel

    A California state appeals court on Monday declined to revive a purported whistleblower suit alleging LabCorp had pressured a genetic counselor to alter a patient’s medical records and then fired her, saying there was nothing medical about the records or illegal about the changes the counselor was asked to make. 

  • June 12, 2018

    Ex-Oil Co. VP Fights SEC Disgorgement Bid Over EB-5 Scam

    A former official at Luca International Group LLC accused of helping perpetrate a $68 million Ponzi-esque scheme involving the EB-5 immigrant investor program told a California federal judge on Monday that she doesn’t owe authorities disgorgement and civil penalties, saying she was clueless as to the alleged securities violations.

  • June 12, 2018

    Enviros Say Calif. County Rule Removes Oil And Gas Scrutiny

    A coalition of environmental advocates have appealed a California state court's decision to uphold a Kern County ordinance they say fast-tracks oil and gas permitting, arguing the outcome allows wells to be drilled without first going through a proper environmental review.

  • June 12, 2018

    Allergan's Fat-Freezing Unit Freed From False Ad Claims

    A California federal judge let an Allergan PLC unit off the hook for proposed class action claims that it deceived customers with marketing materials that classified its “CoolSculpting” fat-freezing system as having been “cleared,” but not “approved” by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

  • June 12, 2018

    Litigation Support Co. In Hot Water As Belkin IP Trial Starts

    Opening statements kicked off Tuesday in a California federal trial over Kenu Inc.’s claims Belkin infringed a patent for in-car phone holders, but before the proceedings even began, news that Belkin’s litigation support company forged a court officer’s signature prompted the presiding judge to call for criminal fraud charges against the vendor.

  • June 12, 2018

    Cisco Loses Bid For Immediate Appeal On Antitrust Immunity

    A California federal judge has refused to send the question of whether Cisco should be shielded from Arista's antitrust suit over Ethernet switches to the Ninth Circuit, saying the ruling denying the technology company's bid for Noerr-Pennington immunity didn't merit an immediate appeal.

  • June 12, 2018

    Rosen Law To Lead AMD Investor Suit Over Chip Flaw

    A California federal judge appointed The Rosen Law Firm PA as lead counsel for investors who sued Advanced Micro Devices Inc. when the company’s share price dropped following a revelation that its chips were more vulnerable to a security flaw than had been previously disclosed.

  • June 12, 2018

    Attys Want $47M From $166M Lidoderm Pay-For-Delay Deal

    Attorneys for the direct purchasers of the Lidoderm pain patch urged a California federal judge to approve more than $47 million in attorneys' fees and reimbursements out of a $166 million settlement with pharmaceutical companies Teikoku, Endo and Actavis.

  • June 12, 2018

    Wilson Sonsini Nabs Squire Patton Tech, Life Sci Pro In LA

    Wilson Sonsini Goodrich & Rosati PC has scored a corporate attorney in Los Angeles from Squire Patton Boggs LLP with significant experience representing technology, life sciences and other growth companies in the United States and internationally, the firm announced Monday.

  • June 11, 2018

    Square To Pay $2.2M To Settle Food Delivery Tip Claims

    Mobile payment company Square Inc. will pay up to $2.2 million to settle a putative class action alleging its restaurant delivery service, Caviar, collected tips from customers that weren’t given to delivery drivers, according to notices sent to 93,000 people who used the service.

  • June 11, 2018

    Netflix Rejects Claims That Exec Bonuses Hurt Shareholders

    Netflix Inc. asked a California federal judge Friday to toss a shareholder suit accusing the streaming service of misclassifying executives’ “exorbitant” bonuses for tax purposes, saying the shareholder failed to either notify Netflix’s board before suing or prove the board couldn’t fairly handle the issue.

  • June 11, 2018

    Ford’s $50M Faulty Touch-Screen Deal Faces Skeptical Judge

    Ford’s proposed deal to end claims it sold cars with faulty touch screens could be worth more than $50 million, the customers’ attorneys told a California federal judge Monday, but the judge worried the proposed notice and claims process would mean many class members go unpaid.

  • June 11, 2018

    Ex-Marriott Waiter Tells 9th Circ. Contract Flouts Wage Law

    An ex-Marriott waiter urged the Ninth Circuit on Monday to revive his putative wage class action, saying a lower court’s conclusion that hotel workers waived San Jose, California’s minimum wage under their collective bargaining agreement was based on a misreading of the local wage ordinance.

  • June 11, 2018

    Dov Charney Must Pay Glaser Weil $2.2M After Arbitration

    A California judge on Monday confirmed an arbitrator's finding that Glaser Weil Fink Howard Avchen & Shapiro LLP did not commit legal malpractice while representing ousted American Apparel founder Dov Charney, and that Charney must pay the firm roughly $2.2 million in legal fees.

  • June 11, 2018

    Saks Hit With Class Action Over 'Notorious' Hackers' Breach

    Saks & Co. got slapped with a proposed class action in California federal court Friday that accuses the retailer of failing to protect its customers’ credit and debit card numbers from a data breach engineered by a “notorious hacking group” that allegedly attacked nearly all of Saks’ point-of-sale systems in March.

Expert Analysis

  • Calif. Taxpayers Shouldn't Be Penalized For Gillette Elections

    Shail Shah

    Taxpayers that made the Gillette election on their California returns should file protests to contest any penalties assessed by the Franchise Tax Board, say attorneys at Reed Smith LLP.

  • Advertiser Self-Regulation And Class Actions: Part 2

    John Villafranco

    Are plaintiffs lawyers scouring National Advertising Division rulings for litigation targets? An analysis of the timing of class actions in relation to NAD decisions suggests that the risk of being subject to a follow-on consumer class action after participation in an NAD proceeding that results in an adverse decision is low, say attorneys with Kelley Drye & Warren LLP.

  • Key Issues States Face In The Wake Of Sports Bet Ruling

    Jim Havel

    While the U.S. Supreme Court’s decision this week removing the federal ban on sports betting may appear straightforward, the path toward regulating sports betting across the United States may be anything but simple, say attorneys with Bryan Cave Leighton Paisner LLP.

  • California May Pass Its Own GDPR

    Purvi Patel

    If approved by voters in November, the California Consumer Privacy Act would impose a sweeping privacy regime like the EU’s General Data Protection Regulation. The act covers virtually all information a business has about a consumer, expanding far beyond traditional notions of personal information, say Purvi Patel and Alexandra Laks of Morrison & Foerster LLP.

  • Advertiser Self-Regulation And Class Actions: Part 1

    John Villafranco

    When an advertiser voluntarily participates in industry self-regulation before the National Advertising Division, it does so expecting to avoid litigation. Yet there is a consistent concern among advertisers that NAD participation may make consumer class action litigation more, rather than less, likely. Attorneys with Kelley Drye & Warren LLP examine whether NAD decisions actually provide fodder for class actions.

  • Opinion

    Why Won't Judicial Nominees Affirm Brown V. Board Of Ed?

    Franita Tolson

    On May 17, 1954, the U.S. Supreme Court decided Brown v. Board of Education, recognizing a moral and legal truth that should be beyond question in American society. The refusal by some of President Donald Trump's judicial nominees to say whether they believe the case was decided correctly is indicative of the narrow-minded elitism they would bring to the bench, says professor Franita Tolson of the University of Southern California's Gould School of Law.

  • Demanding Fairness In Evaluating Past Medical Damages

    Asir Fiola

    A recent ruling from a California court of appeals in Pebley v. Santa Clara Organics encourages plaintiffs in personal injury actions to continue the trend of seeking medical treatment that would normally be covered by their insurance from physicians who are outside their coverage plans. This will result in an unjust windfall for plaintiffs, says Asir Fiola of Selman Breitman LLP.

  • The Lawyers' Guide To Cloud Computing

    Daniel Garrie

    In deciding whether cloud computing is right for the organization or firm, an attorney must consider cloud computing’s significant impact on the electronic discovery process, say Daniel Garrie, managing partner at Law & Forensics LLC, and David Cass, chief information security officer at IBM Cloud.

  • Calif. Attorney-Officials Must Heed AG's Ethics Warning

    Gary Schons

    The California attorney general recently issued an opinion on the conflicts posed when an attorney who serves as a city councilmember has a client with interests adverse to the city. The opinion illustrates that ethical conflicts can arise when a lawyer has a fiduciary relationship, but not an attorney-client relationship, with a person or legal entity, says Gary Schons of Best Best & Krieger LLP.

  • Defenses For Using Contractors In A Post-Dynamex World

    Samantha Rollins

    While the revamped test for independent contractor status under the California Supreme Court's recent decision in Dynamex Operations West v. Superior Court raises new questions under state law, it also presents opportunities for companies to present new legal arguments (and take new proactive steps) in defense of independent contractor relationships, say Samantha Rollins and Andrew Murphy of Faegre Baker Daniels LLP.