California

  • July 09, 2020

    Don't Trim Ripple Suit, Investors Urge Calif. Judge

    Purchasers of the digital currency XRP who claim it's an unregistered security on Wednesday urged a California federal judge to let their full suit go forward against the currency's maker Ripple Labs Inc., saying they'd clearly explained in their complaint why they contend that the company lied.

  • July 09, 2020

    3 Firms Fight To Lead Class In Juul-Altria Antitrust Suits

    Hausfeld, Berman Tabacco and the Joseph Saveri Law Firm have filed competing bids requesting a California federal judge name them lead counsel for a group of consumers who accuse e-cigarette maker Juul and former rival Altria of violating antitrust laws by conspiring to reduce the variety of products on the market.

  • July 09, 2020

    High Court Sends Birth Control Coverage Cases To 9th Circ.

    The U.S. Supreme Court on Thursday undid a Ninth Circuit injunction that blocked a pair of Trump administration rules making it easier for employers to skirt the Affordable Care Act's contraception mandate, a day after the justices upheld the regulations in a similar case.

  • July 09, 2020

    Employment Firm's TM Suit Gives Rival's Name A Bad Review

    The Employment Law Group lodged a trademark lawsuit Thursday in D.C. federal court against the San Diego Employment Law Group, alleging that the defendant operated under a different name until it received several negative Yelp reviews.

  • July 09, 2020

    Civil Rights Attys Fear Religious Turn At High Court

    The U.S. Supreme Court's recent decision in Trump v. Pennsylvania could devastate American workers who use birth control in the short term while chipping away at nondiscrimination protections in the long term, civil rights advocates say.

  • July 09, 2020

    9th Circ. Kicks Costco PAGA Seating Suit Back To State Court

    The Ninth Circuit ruled Thursday that a lower court erred by removing a Costco worker's Private Attorneys General Act lawsuit over unprovided seating to federal court, rejecting Costco's arguments that labeling a complaint as a "class action" is enough to meet removal requirements under the Class Action Fairness Act.

  • July 09, 2020

    High Court Won't Pick Up Charter's Bid To Overturn TCPA

    The U.S. Supreme Court on Thursday declined to take up Charter Communications' challenge to the Telephone Consumer Protection Act's autodialer restrictions, after a divided high court earlier this week upheld the statute's sweeping ban on robocalls but stomped on an exemption for government-backed debt collectors.

  • July 09, 2020

    FBI Agent Grilled On Russian Officials' Integrity In Hack Trial

    Counsel for a Russian national on trial in California federal court over 2012 cyberattacks on LinkedIn and Dropbox tore into an FBI agent who investigated the data breaches on Thursday, cross-examining the agent about the reliability of evidence provided by Russian authorities before resting his case without calling witnesses.

  • July 09, 2020

    Calif. Blasts ICE's New Int'l Student Attendance Policy In Suit

    California became the first state on Thursday to lodge a lawsuit challenging the Trump administration's new requirement that international students whose universities go fully online during the pandemic leave the U.S. or risk deportation.

  • July 09, 2020

    LA Minority Pot Licensing Suit Settles After City Adds Spots

    Cannabis entrepreneurs who lost out in Los Angeles' controversial licensing process for minority business owners have agreed to drop their lawsuit seeking a do-over after the city agreed to double the number of spots for social equity applicants as part of a settlement.

  • July 09, 2020

    StubHub Wants MLB Ticket Refund Suit Sent To Arbitration

    StubHub on Wednesday said claims from Major League Baseball fans who want refunds for tickets purchased to games canceled because of the COVID-19 pandemic should be tossed or sent to arbitration under its terms of service agreement.

  • July 09, 2020

    Coronavirus Litigation: The Week In Review

    A federal court for the first time decided a COVID-19 insurance coverage case on the merits, ruling against a policyholder, while Amazon says workers are exploiting the coronavirus pandemic for workplace reforms, and a coalition of states is suing the U.S. Department of Education over a new rule it says will unfairly limit public schools' access to coronavirus relief funding.

  • July 09, 2020

    Dems Tell Trump To Revisit LGBT Policies After Title VII Ruling

    A group of 120 Democratic members of Congress are calling on the Trump administration to review all federal agency regulations and policies that affect LGBT people in light of the Supreme Court's Title VII ruling last month.

  • July 09, 2020

    Facebook Dodges App Makers' Antitrust Suit, For Now

    Facebook has dodged a suit by a handful of tech companies alleging the social media giant intentionally set out to destroy app developers it deemed potential rivals, though the California federal judge who tossed the case said the companies could come back with a retooled complaint.

  • July 09, 2020

    DOJ Backs Solar Energy Customers In Rate Row At 9th Circ.

    The U.S. Department of Justice has thrown its support behind a challenge to rates imposed by an Arizona utility on customers that supply some of their own power through solar panels, urging the Ninth Circuit to revive an antitrust case from consumers targeting the rates.

  • July 09, 2020

    Fed. Circ. Partly Upholds Not Sealing Uniloc's Docs In IP Suit

    Uniloc was dealt a partial loss in its patent dispute with Apple when the Federal Circuit ruled in a precedential opinion Thursday that a lower court properly refused Uniloc's "grossly excessive" request to seal or redact confidential information relating to its licensing practices.

  • July 09, 2020

    Patent Cases To Watch In The Second Half Of 2020

    A wave of U.S. Supreme Court petition denials has made 2020 a bit of a letdown for patent attorneys, but there are several high-profile cases on the horizon that could decide the fate of Patent Trial and Appeal Board judges and biosimilars law, and offer more clarity on licensing standard essential patents.

  • July 09, 2020

    Distributor Must Arbitrate $70M Fight With Auto Parts Maker

    The former U.S. distributor for a Taiwanese manufacturer of automotive replacement parts must arbitrate its $70 million dispute accusing the parts maker of stealing its customers and trade secrets, a California federal judge ruled on Wednesday.

  • July 09, 2020

    DOJ Blasts Chinese Cos.' Immunity Arguments In CRT Appeal

    The federal government told the Ninth Circuit that a pair of Chinese electronics companies should face claims in multidistrict litigation for conspiring to fix the price of cathode ray tubes because neither is entitled to sovereign immunity.

  • July 09, 2020

    FERC, PG&E Clash On How To End Ch. 11 Power Deal Fight

    The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission and Pacific Gas & Electric Co. on Wednesday agreed that the utility's recent Chapter 11 exit moots a turf war over power contract rejection in bankruptcy, but split over whether the Ninth Circuit should toss FERC's original claim that it had jurisdiction.

  • July 09, 2020

    Haynes And Boone Nabs Ex-Davis Wright Patent Pro In SF

    Haynes and Boone LLP has brought on a former Davis Wright Tremaine LLP partner with three decades of experience in patent prosecution to its new San Francisco office, the firm has announced.

  • July 09, 2020

    Silicon Valley VC Firm Closes Global Fund Family With $880M

    DCM, a global venture capital firm that has invested in Uber's Careem and TikTok's predecessor, said Thursday that it has closed its largest fund family yet with $880 million, which will be used to make early stage investments in online software providers, financial technology enterprises and online companies.

  • July 09, 2020

    Williams-Sonoma Wants Thread-Count Suit In Arbitration

    Williams-Sonoma Inc. is asking a California federal court to send to arbitration a proposed class action alleging the company misled consumers about the thread count of its bedding, saying the proposed class representative agreed to arbitration when she made her purchases as recently as the day before she joined the suit.

  • July 09, 2020

    Green Group Sues To Stop Calif. Tribe's Wind Farm

    An environmental group in Southern California says that a proposed wind farm near the U.S.-Mexico border should be put on hold until a full analysis of its impacts on the region and on migratory birds can be completed.

  • July 09, 2020

    Calif. Joins Car Parts Price-Fixing MDL

    The state of California has again hopped into a sprawling multidistrict litigation case over an alleged scheme to inflate prices for auto parts, filing a complaint against Hitachi Automotive Systems Ltd. in Michigan federal court Wednesday.

Expert Analysis

  • What Justices' Bias Ruling Means For Religious Employers

    Author Photo

    The U.S. Supreme Court’s ruling Wednesday in Our Lady of Guadalupe School v. Morrissey-Berru may bar many religious organization workers' discrimination claims, but documentation of their role in faith education will be key to defending challenged employment decisions, say Dylan Carp and Paul Patten at Jackson Lewis.

  • 2 Investment Advice Rulings Offer Lessons On Insider Liability

    Author Photo

    The Second Circuit's recent dismissals in Rubenstein v. International Value Advisers and Rubenstein v. Rofam may make it harder for plaintiffs seeking to impose liability premised on the existence of an insider group comprising an adviser and its clients, say Renee Zaytsev and Philip Sineneng at Thompson Hine.

  • COVID-19 Will Have Lasting Impact On Construction Contracts

    Author Photo

    Allocating the costs of construction project delays, lost productivity and work stoppages due to COVID-19 could be a long and contentious process, and contract drafting strategies will likely evolve as stakeholders seek to minimize similar impacts in the future, say Debbie Cazan and Mike Shanlever at Alston & Bird.

  • Mask-Wearing Prosecution Witnesses May Face Roadblocks

    Author Photo

    When in-person criminal jury trials resume, witnesses wearing masks as protection against the coronavirus will almost certainly lead to a new line of cases weighing public health against a defendant's Sixth Amendment right to confront prosecution witnesses, says Scott Grubman at Chilivis Grubman.

  • 6 Considerations When Shopping For Legal Tech Software

    Author Photo

    When evaluating the vast range of legal technology options available today, law firms will want to make sure that firm intellectual property and client data stored in the software are encrypted, isolated, protected through backups and in compliance with the ever-growing list of data regulations, say Eric Tucker and Dorna Moini at Documate.

  • Ohio Ruling Adds To Insurance Uncertainty For Opioid Suits

    Author Photo

    An Ohio appeals court's recent decision in Acuity v. Masters Pharmaceutical fails to address an insurer's duty to indemnify policyholders embattled in opioid litigation, only amplifying the uncertainty surrounding insurance coverage for opioid judgments and settlements, say attorneys at Nicolaides.

  • Aviation Watch: The Pilot's Liability In The Kobe Bryant Crash

    Author Photo

    A close analysis of the known facts about the Kobe Bryant helicopter crash suggests that liability rests not with the aircraft manufacturer, but with the pilot, who violated fundamental flight rules and made a fatal misjudgment, says Alan Hoffman, a retired attorney and aviation expert.

  • Law Firm Strategies For Publicizing Laterals Amid Lockdowns

    Author Photo

    With business development dinners and social events no longer viable for new lateral hires, law firms need a refreshed game plan — one that fully exploits the digital landscape, say Andrew Longstreth and Jesse Dungan at Infinite Global and Michael Coston at Coston Consulting.

  • Opinion

    9th Circ. Was Right: Suppressing The Truth Is Wrong

    Author Photo

    The Ninth Circuit's recent ruling in IMDb.com v. Becerra correctly affirmed that possibly harmful uses of true information do not justify censorship when it nullified a prohibition on publishing actors' birthdates, say M.C. Sungaila and Natasha Breaux at Haynes and Boone.

  • Are Your Slack Communications Primed For E-Discovery?

    Author Photo

    With the increasing use of channel-based platforms such as Slack, Messenger and Teams in the work-from-home era, companies should assume they may be compelled to produce channel-based data in litigation and take proactive steps to protect sensitive information, say Jessica Brown and Collin James Vierra at Gibson Dunn.

  • Versatile Defense Strategy Is Best For Privacy Class Actions

    Author Photo

    Recent federal court decisions reveal that an immediate, aggressive and multifaceted response to increasingly frequent consumer class actions under Illinois' and California's privacy laws should resolve the controversy before costly and time-consuming litigation, say attorneys at Squire Patton.

  • 9th Circ.'s VW Ruling Promotes Patchwork Auto Regs

    Author Photo

    The Ninth Circuit's recent ruling in the Volkswagen multidistrict litigation that the Clean Air Act does not preempt state and local anti-tampering laws for post-sale vehicles raises significant concerns about patchwork regulation of vehicle maintenance, recalls and field fixes, say attorneys at Sidley.

  • 6 Dispute Prevention Steps As Lawsuits Rise Amid Pandemic

    Author Photo

    With the inundation of lawsuits resulting from the pandemic, now is an opportune time for companies and their advisers to implement prevention measures explicitly designed to break the dispute cycle early and to de-escalate possible legal actions as they form, says arbitrator and mediator Janice Sperow.

  • SEC's Insider Info Case Shows Perils Of Portfolio Co. Trading

    Author Photo

    The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission's recently settled enforcement action against Ares Management demonstrates that private fund managers with potential insider info should systematically investigate trading approvals in situations that present a heightened risk of access to material nonpublic information, say attorneys at Debevoise.

  • COVID-19 Orders Unlikely To Constitute Temporary Takings

    Author Photo

    Although public agencies have issued a broad range of orders intended to slow the spread of COVID-19, they are likely safe from temporary takings claims due to the high hurdles for such claims and the expanded police powers granted to governments during public health emergencies, say Gene Tanaka and Emily Chaidez at Best Best.

Hello! I'm Law360's automated support bot.

How can I help you today?

For example, you can type:
  • I forgot my password
  • I took a free trial but didn't get a verification email
  • How do I sign up for a newsletter?
Beta
Ask a question!