California

  • December 02, 2022

    Ex-Chief Of Staff For LA County DA Lodges Retaliation Suit

    The former chief of staff for Los Angeles County District Attorney George Gascón has accused him of retaliating against her for flagging some of Gascón's directives and hires as illegal, according to a suit filed in Los Angeles County Superior Court.

  • December 02, 2022

    Los Angeles City Council Approves 'Historic' Oil Drilling Ban

    The Los Angeles City Council on Friday voted to ban all oil drilling in the city, signing off on an ordinance that council members and community advocates praised as "historic," particularly for a city that owes much of its early development and growth to the oil and gas industry.

  • December 02, 2022

    Google Escapes Revised 'LockBox' Privacy Dispute For Good

    A California federal judge has permanently tossed a proposed class action accusing Google of using a secret program called "Android Lockbox" to unlawfully collect data from non-Google apps on Android devices, finding that the plaintiffs had failed to remedy pleading deficiencies that previously doomed their claims. 

  • December 02, 2022

    Harvey Weinstein's Fate In LA Rape Trial Goes To Jury

    A California jury began deliberations on rape and sexual assault charges against Harvey Weinstein on Friday after a prosecutor wrapped up rebuttal closing arguments by encouraging the jurors not to buy into the disgraced movie mogul's "magic" theory that eight accusers who don't know each other are all lying.

  • December 02, 2022

    Billing Contractor Must Fork Over Docs In Surprise-Billing Suit

    A California federal judge ordered billing contractor MultiPlan on Friday to fork over hundreds of documents it had previously withheld from discovery in a lawsuit brought by patients alleging their insurer lowballed them on out-of-network claim reimbursements, finding the company had waived all claimed protections in its privilege log.

  • December 02, 2022

    Elizabeth Holmes Appeals Conviction, Sentence To 9th Circ.

    Ex-Theranos CEO Elizabeth Holmes notified a California federal judge Friday that she's appealing her investor fraud conviction and 11-year prison sentence to the Ninth Circuit, sending the closely watched criminal case to the appellate court for review after more than four years before the trial court.

  • December 02, 2022

    9th Circ. Breathes New Life Into Forklift Parade Coverage Suit

    An insurer can't get out of covering a forklift driver accused in a $1 million suit of injuring a bystander during a forklift parade, the Ninth Circuit ruled Friday, finding that a policy's mobile equipment exclusion is ambiguous.

  • December 02, 2022

    Teen Chess Whiz's Lawsuit Is 'Publicity Stunt,' Court Told

    Magnus Carlsen and other defendants asked a Missouri federal judge on Friday to toss what they called a meritless defamation suit brought against them by Carlsen's chess rival and admitted cheater Hans Moke Niemann, arguing the case is merely a "publicity stunt."

  • December 02, 2022

    Doctor Repped By RFK Jr. Targets COVID Misinformation Law

    A California physician represented by attorney and anti-vaccine activist Robert F. Kennedy Jr. urged a federal court to block a Golden State law that would deem as unprofessional the dissemination of COVID-19 misinformation by medical workers, arguing that the law is unconstitutionally vague.

  • December 02, 2022

    Crypto Bank Silvergate Hit With Investor Suit Over FTX Ties

    Investors have lodged a proposed class action against Silvergate Bank, which they say was "complicit in and responsible for" some of the losses stemming from the downfall of FTX Trading Ltd. because the cryptocurrency bank allowed FTX to direct customer deposits to a hedge fund owned by its former CEO, Sam Bankman-Fried.

  • December 02, 2022

    Walmart's $35M Calif. Wage Statement Deal Nears Finish Line

    A California federal judge said Friday that he'll grant final approval to Walmart's $35 million deal to resolve class claims that the retail giant gave inaccurate wage statements to about 265,000 workers, a settlement that will pay class attorneys $11.6 million in fees.

  • December 02, 2022

    Guns N' Roses Wants Firearm Store's TM Slashed

    Hard rock band Guns N' Roses is suing a Houston-based firearms and gun accessory store over its alleged unauthorized use of the "Guns and Roses" trademark, saying it does not want to be associated with a weapons retailer that emphasizes potentially "polarizing" political views to consumers.

  • December 02, 2022

    Calif. Agency Approved Oil Wells Without Review, Group Says

    An environmental group says California's oil and gas regulator did not conduct any new reviews for 17 wells it greenlit in Los Angeles and Kern counties, urging a state court to void the approvals that the nonprofit says relied on decades-old, inadequate analyses.

  • December 02, 2022

    Real Estate Rumors: Quarters, BankUnited, Ben Silverman

    Quarters is reportedly hoping to sell a Brooklyn co-living property for $65 million, BankUnited is said to have loaned $26.85 million for a New York apartment building, and Ben Silverman is said to have sold a Los Angeles mansion for $29.5 million.

  • December 02, 2022

    Interest Rates Doom Lender, Crypto Winter Persists

    Rising interest rates forced a reverse mortgage lender into Chapter 11, cryptocurrency platform BlockFi succumbed to the downfall of exchange FTX Trading, and FTX itself faced calls for an examination of its collapse. This is the week in bankruptcy.

  • December 02, 2022

    Pierre Fabre Accused Of Selling Cancerous Dry Shampoo

    A proposed class of dry shampoo buyers are suing Pierre Fabre USA Inc. in Illinois federal court, alleging that its Klorane brand of products contains benzene, a chemical that can cause cancer in humans.

  • December 02, 2022

    50 Judges Open Up About Law Clerk Selection And Diversity

    Landing a judicial clerkship can open many doors for recent law school graduates, but a new study based on confidential interviews with 50 federal appeals court judges provides a rare glimpse into how jurists fill those clerkships and why there is a persistent lack of diversity in law clerk hiring.

  • December 02, 2022

    Judge Suggests Contempt Over Fla. Mover's $13.6M IOU Offer

    A federal judge has found a Florida man in civil contempt for trying to submit an IOU in response to a $13.6 million judgment against him for imitating a moving company's website, saying that wasn't sufficient to pay the debt over his trademark infringement.

  • December 02, 2022

    Calif. Jury Clears CPUC In Exec's $4.8M Whistleblower Trial

    A Golden State jury on Thursday cleared the California Public Utilities Commission of liability in a weekslong whistleblower trial over a former CPUC executive director's claims that she's owed $4.8 million for calling out the regulators' "fiscal and operational dysfunction," according to the executive's attorneys.

  • December 02, 2022

    9th Circ. Lets Insurers Join $3.2M Superfund Cleanup Dispute

    A group of insurers is permitted to intervene in a California agency's $3.2 million suit against a bankrupt policyholder over remediation costs at a Superfund site, the Ninth Circuit ruled, finding that the carriers had a legally protected interest in preventing the entry of default judgment against their insured.

  • December 02, 2022

    Remote Alaska Village Urges 9th Circ. To Reject Land Swap

    Residents of a Native Alaskan village have asked the Ninth Circuit to overturn a federal land swap hundreds of miles to their south, stating the exchange could pave the way for a commercial road through a wildlife refuge that would disturb wild geese they depend on for subsistence.

  • December 02, 2022

    LA Man Convicted Of Attempted $1.9M COVID Fraud

    A Los Angeles man was convicted by a jury Thursday of using fraudulent applications to obtain $150,000 in COVID-19 aid, and attempting to get another $1.9 million.

  • December 02, 2022

    Barnes & Thornburg Adds Former Fisher Phillips Partner In LA

    Barnes & Thornburg expanded its ranks in Los Angeles with the addition of a former Fisher Phillips lawyer who spends the lion's share of her time helping employers deal with compliance issues stemming from the COVID-19 pandemic, according to the firm. 

  • December 02, 2022

    Certain Solar Imports Found To Circumvent Tariffs On China

    The U.S. Department of Commerce made an initial determination on Friday that certain solar cell imports from Cambodia, Malaysia, Thailand and Vietnam circumvented U.S. tariffs on Chinese-made solar modules.

  • December 02, 2022

    Yale Lock Owner Sells Units To Clear $4.3B US Hardware Deal

    Swedish locks giant Assa Abloy said on Friday that it will sell some of its businesses to a security company for $800 million in response to opposition from the U.S. Department of Justice over its planned $4.3 billion deal to buy divisions of a home products firm.

Expert Analysis

  • Reviewing Separation Agreement Compliance Before Layoffs

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    As a potential recession triggers layoff considerations, employers should begin reviewing their separation agreement templates to ensure they include the desired protections for the employer while complying with applicable, and recently amended, state laws, says Victoria Hubona at Sheppard Mullin.

  • Safeguarding Attorneys' Greatest Asset: Our Mental Health

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    Attorneys who understand that mental fitness is their most valuable characteristic should prioritize mental health care accordingly, including with certain activities they may not realize qualify as self-care, says Wendy Robbins at Holland & Knight.

  • Opinion

    Benefits Ruling Shows Need For Revised ERISA Procedure

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    The Ninth Circuit's recent ruling in Collier v. Lincoln Life Assurance demonstrates that not only are there no uniform court procedures for Employee Retirement Income Security Act litigation, the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure are not always followed, demanding a reappraisal of ERISA civil procedure, says Mark DeBofsky at DeBofsky Law.

  • Could State Ownership Solve US Cannabis Policy Issues?

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    Provincial cannabis wholesalers in Canada are enjoying huge profits, begging the question of whether a government-owned cannabis model could eventually be replicated in the U.S. to tackle issues ranging from social equity to overproduction — but this would undoubtedly introduce other complex challenges, says Hilary Bricken at Harris Bricken.

  • Calif. And UK Laws Reflect Global Focus On Kids' Privacy

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    The recent signing of the California Age-Appropriate Design Code Act into law and the U.K. Age-Appropriate Design Code that inspired it highlight the convergence of regulatory forces internationally and an emphasis on privacy by design, which means emerging companies that deal with children's data may need to dedicate resources to this topic early on, say attorneys at Goodwin.

  • And Now A Word From The Panel: 10 Years Of MDL Lessons

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    To celebrate 10 years of columns analyzing the decisions of the Judicial Panel on Multidistrict Litigation, Alan Rothman at Sidley looks back to highlight 10 important lessons for MDL practitioners.

  • Co-Authorship Takeaways From Pop Star Copyright Battles

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    This year's song copyright ownership battles involving Post Malone and Lizzo illustrate how songwriters working in informal settings without consideration of legal formalities can encounter claims of joint authorship from alleged co-writers, and the common thread in such claims is the absence of a written agreement, says Matthew Wilson at Arnall Golden.

  • Opinion

    Law Schools Are Right To Steer Clear Of US News Rankings

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    By opting out of participating in the U.S. News & World Report annual rankings, law schools abandon a profoundly flawed system and free up their resources to adapt to the tsunami of changes overtaking the profession, says Nicholas Allard at Jacksonville University College of Law.

  • Lessons From Justices' Evolving Approach To COVID Rulings

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    Akiva Shapiro and William Moccia at Gibson Dunn discuss how the U.S. Supreme Court's approach to COVID-19 cases evolved over the course of the pandemic, and how the progression has affected the court's emergency applications docket and provided guidance for lower courts.

  • After Joint Juice, Questions On NY Statutory Awards Remain

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    A California federal court's recent Montera v. Premier Nutrition decision addressed the question of whether consumers can obtain classwide statutory damages under New York's General Business Law in federal court, but it isn't the lodestar false advertising lawyers were hoping for, say Henry Wainhouse and Joshua Kipnees at Patterson Belknap.

  • Opinion

    Litigation Funders Seek Transparency In Disclosure Debate

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    Litigation funders want to correct the record on calls for funding disclosure in the name of transparency, as this purported justification obscures the disclosure's adverse effects — prejudicing plaintiffs' cases and discouraging the assertion of meritorious legal claims, say Dai Wai Chin Feman and William Weisman at Parabellum Capital.

  • Silver Lining For Cos. In Proposed Calif. Privacy Law Changes

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    Some of the California Privacy Protection Agency’s recent modifications to the proposed regulations implementing the California Privacy Rights Act may be positive for businesses’ compliance strategies, as they make it easier to respond to data subject requests and strengthen security and fraud prevention, say attorneys at Troutman Pepper.

  • Privacy Ruling Highlights Risks Of Third-Party Web Tracking

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    The Ninth Circuit’s recent ruling in Javier v. Assurance — that third-party session replay software usage without user consent may violate a California privacy law — highlights why companies should remain proactive and review all technologies that collect information from their websites, say attorneys at K&L Gates.

  • 5 Principles For Better Professional Development Programs

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    The pandemic and ensuing "great resignation" have resulted in a more transient legal work force, but law firms can use effective professional development programs to bridge a cultural gap with new associates and stem associate attrition, says Matthew Woods at Robins Kaplan.

  • Series

    My Favorite Law Prof: How I Learned To Practice With Passion

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    First Circuit Judge Gustavo Gelpí recalls how Suffolk University Law School's Joseph Glannon taught the importance of the law as both a tool and a profession, and that those who wish to practice law successfully must do so with love, enthusiasm and passion.

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