We use cookies on this site to enable your digital experience. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our cookie policy. close

Class Action

  • February 6, 2019

    Drinker Biddle Snags Antitrust Pro For San Fran Office

    Drinker Biddle & Reath LLP has added a litigator with more than three decades of class action and antitrust litigation experience under his belt as a partner in its San Francisco office, according to the firm.

  • February 6, 2019

    Sports Fans Reach $2.5M Text Deal With Network, Car Cos.

    A proposed class of cellphone users who subscribed to receive sports text updates have asked a Florida federal judge to preliminarily approve a $2.5 million settlement with Mid-Atlantic Sports Network, Hyundai and Mercedes-Benz, which allegedly violated telecommunications law by also texting unsolicited sales promotions.

  • February 6, 2019

    Okla. Hotels Fail To Shake Human Trafficking Class Suit

    An Oklahoma federal judge has rejected bids by the owners of a Holiday Inn Express and a Hampton Inn in the state to toss a putative class action in which several Jamaicans contend the owners used J-1 exchange visitor visas to lure them into a human trafficking scheme.

  • February 6, 2019

    Supreme Court Could Toss A Brick Through Antitrust Classes

    The U.S. Supreme Court could soon make it much more complicated to litigate price-fixing lawsuits, including major class actions, if the justices reverse a 1977 precedent that limits indirect purchasers' ability to bring antitrust claims.

  • February 6, 2019

    Aerohive Dodges Investors’ Revenue Growth Suit

    Aerohive Networks Inc. escaped a putative class action accusing it of hiding personnel issues and declining revenue growth from its investors after a California federal judge tossed the suit in its entirety on Tuesday, finding the investors’ complaint was unconvincing and lacking in detail.

  • February 6, 2019

    Buyers Not Getting Their Fill From Chocolate Boxes, Suit Says

    Russell Stover Chocolates LLC and Ghirardelli Chocolate Co. have been accused of shorting their customers by deliberately underfilling boxes in a proposed class action filed in New York federal court.

  • February 5, 2019

    Fla. Mobile Home Park Owners, Attys Hit With RICO Suit

    The homeowners’ association for a central Florida mobile home park filed a putative class action Tuesday accusing the park owners and Tampa law firm Lutz Bobo & Telfair PA of engaging in a racketeering scheme to dupe homeowners and buyers into accepting less favorable land rental terms.

  • February 5, 2019

    DQ Ruling In Nassar Suit Gives Law Firm Traction To Appeal

    The Michigan federal judge overseeing lawsuits by women who say they were victims of Dr. Larry Nassar's sexual abuse took a hard line in disqualifying attorneys from representing them, giving the firm and its clients a solid foundation for a planned appeal, legal ethics experts said.

  • February 5, 2019

    Railroad Workers Win Cert. In Suit Over Health Disclosures

    A Nebraska federal judge on Tuesday certified a class of more than 7,000 Union Pacific Railroad Co. workers in a disability bias suit alleging the company illegally required them to disclose various medical conditions and then pulled them off the job even if those conditions had no impact on their ability to work.  

  • February 5, 2019

    Calvin Klein Parent Co. Facing Another Calif. Wage Suit

    PVH Corp., the parent company of Calvin Klein, Tommy Hilfiger and Speedo, was hit Monday with a proposed class action alleging the company stiffs California retail workers on wages and breaks, the latest in a string of similar suits.

  • February 5, 2019

    Musicians Sue Sony, UMG For 'Second Chance' At Copyright

    Sony Music Entertainment Inc. and UMG Recordings Inc. have violated a provision of copyright law giving creators a “second chance” to assert rights over their works after 35 years, a group of musicians alleged in a pair of proposed class actions filed Tuesday in New York federal court.

  • February 5, 2019

    Seeger Weiss Defends Additional NFL Concussion Deal Fees

    Seeger Weiss LLP shot back Monday against objections to its latest request for $2.7 million from the common benefit fund in the National Football League concussion settlement, telling a Pennsylvania federal court it's earned every penny spent implementing the complex deal.

  • February 5, 2019

    CBS Gets $10M OT Deal With Parking-Spot Guards Approved

    A Manhattan federal judge gave final approval Tuesday to a $9.98 million settlement between CBS Television Studios and production assistants hired to guard parking spaces who claimed they weren't paid overtime, an accord that includes a $3.3 million payment to class counsel Valli Kane & Vagnini LLP.

  • February 5, 2019

    Pharma Co. Seeks Justice Review Over Updating Statements

    Executives at now-bankrupt biotechnology company Orexigen Therapeutics Inc. have asked the U.S. Supreme Court to review the Ninth Circuit's finding that the company should have alerted the public when it learned a drug wasn't as beneficial as earlier data indicated, even though the earlier data weren't technically inaccurate.

  • February 5, 2019

    Corning Can't Beat Class Action Over Biased Worker Reviews

    A New York federal judge rejected Corning Inc.’s bid to end a proposed class action alleging it denies black workers equal access to higher pay bands and networking opportunities, saying the class claims have enough meat to survive into discovery.

  • February 5, 2019

    Chili's Workers Launch Wage Suit Over Use Of Tip Credit

    Chili's was hit with a proposed Fair Labor Standards Act class action in New York federal court Tuesday by workers who accuse the restaurant chain of failing to pay them the minimum wage they were entitled to by incorrectly claiming a tip credit.

  • February 5, 2019

    Charles Schwab Says 9th Circ. Must Compel ERISA Arbitration

    Charles Schwab Corp. told the Ninth Circuit Monday that its workers gave up their right to collectively sue under the Employee Retirement Income Security Act when they joined the company retirement plan, saying the plan’s governing document contains an arbitration agreement and class waiver.

  • February 5, 2019

    GM Trust Hashes Out New Ch. 11 Ignition Switch Deal

    The trust for General Motors’ unsecured creditors has submitted a new proposal to a New York bankruptcy court for a putative class action ignition switch defect settlement that could cost New GM $1 billion in stock.

  • February 5, 2019

    Nossaman Adds Theodora Oringher Trio To Employment Team

    Los Angeles-based Nossaman LLP has added a trio of employment specialists from Theodora Oringher PC to its Orange County, California, team, including two who are joining as partners and co-chairs of the employment practice group, the firm has announced.

  • February 5, 2019

    GSK Can't Escape MDL Alleging Zofran Caused Birth Defects

    A Massachusetts federal judge on Tuesday denied GlaxoSmithKline a quick win in multidistrict litigation claiming its anti-nausea drug Zofran led to birth defects, saying GSK has not proven the U.S. Food and Drug Administration would have rejected a stricter warning label.

Expert Analysis

  • Pa. Cos. Face Greater Risks Related To Workers' Personal Info

    Author Photo

    In Dittman v. UPMC, the Pennsylvania Supreme Court recently held that employers storing employee information on internet-accessible computer systems have a common law duty to protect that data from any foreseeable risk of harm, exposing companies in the state to increased liability, say Carol Steinour Young and Sarah Dotzel of McNees Wallace & Nurick LLC.

  • Series

    Judging A Book: Ginsburg Reviews 'The Curse Of Bigness'

    Author Photo

    When reading Tim Wu’s new book, "The Curse of Bigness: Antitrust in the New Gilded Age," lawyers, economists and historians will find its broad brush maddening, and the generalist reader will simply be misled, says D.C. Circuit Judge Douglas Ginsburg.

  • 5 Things You Should Know About New Rule 23 Amendments

    Author Photo

    For the first time in 15 years, Federal Rule of Civil Procedure 23, governing class actions, has been amended. There are five key changes that will likely impact future federal class action litigation and settlements, say John Lavelle and Terese Schireson of Morgan Lewis & Bockius LLP.

  • Practitioner's Guide To Stratified Random Sampling: Part 2

    Author Photo

    In the final part of this article, Brian Kriegler of Econ One Research Inc. uses a hypothetical wage-and-hour example involving on-duty meal period agreements to simplify the application of stratified random sampling for correct use in a legal setting.

  • Practitioner's Guide To Stratified Random Sampling: Part 1

    Author Photo

    Brian Kriegler of Econ One Research Inc. explains when it might be advantageous to select a random sample that has been divided into multiple subpopulations, such as when evaluating the rate at which a large medical provider submitted ineligible Medicare reimbursements over 10 years.

  • In Hip Implant MDL, Preemption Cuts Across State Lines

    Author Photo

    Plaintiffs in the Smith & Nephew Birmingham Hip Resurfacing multidistrict litigation were subject to different states' statutes of limitations. But whether you bleed Michigan blue or you live where a grizzly bear is your only neighbor, preemption unites us all, says Michelle Hart Yeary of Dechert LLP.

  • The 'No Reasonable Juror' Rule And Antitrust Class Actions

    Author Photo

    Many courts and commentaries see no role for the Tyson “no reasonable juror” standard in the consideration of expert evidence supporting class certification in antitrust cases. However, in at least five decisions, district courts have applied it, says Lawrence Moore of Robinson Bradshaw & Hinson PA.

  • And Now A Word From The Panel: It's Not Just MDLs

    Author Photo

    The Judicial Panel on Multidistrict Litigation is best known for its handling of MDLs, but it has another important role. When challenges to federal agency action are made in multiple courts of appeal, the panel is responsible for consolidating them into a single circuit, says Alan Rothman of Arnold & Porter.

  • Examining A Post-Wildfire Securities Suit

    Author Photo

    A securities class action complaint against utility company Edison following the recent massive wildfires in California is the latest example of event-driven securities litigation, a phenomenon that represents a significant problem for directors and officers insurance underwriters, says Kevin LaCroix of RT ProExec.

  • Jurors Should Ask More Questions During Trials

    Author Photo

    Permitting jurors to submit written questions, or even to pose questions orally to witnesses on the stand, advances several important goals and promotes both fairness and efficiency, says Matthew Wright of McCarter & English LLP.