Class Action

  • October 11, 2019

    Real Estate Developer Settles Spam Text Suit For $1.5M

    A real estate investment management company has agreed to pay $1.5 million to put to bed a proposed class action accusing it of sending more than 100,000 spam text messages promoting its rental apartments, according to documents filed in Florida federal court. 

  • October 11, 2019

    Sorin Settlement Offers Heart Patients Free Monitoring

    The former Sorin Group USA Inc. will provide free medical monitoring to heart surgery patients who were allegedly exposed to greater risk of infection at two Pennsylvania hospitals by the use of Sorin products, according to a preliminary settlement agreement submitted to a federal judge Friday.

  • October 11, 2019

    Court Skeptical Of Columbia's Bid To End ERISA Suit

    A New York federal magistrate judge appeared unpersuaded by Columbia University’s attempts to bring an early end to a class action challenging its retirement plan’s fees and investments, saying during a hearing Friday that he sees factual disputes in the case that can’t be resolved without a trial.

  • October 11, 2019

    Restasis Payors Defend Class Cert. Bid In Allergan Suit

    A group of Restasis buyers on Friday defended class certification in their New York federal suit accusing Allergan of boosting profits by delaying a cheaper generic version of the dry-eye medication, saying they share numerous, common antitrust injuries.

  • October 11, 2019

    8th Circ. Won’t Rehear Monsanto Label Settlement Objection

    The Eighth Circuit will not rehear an objector's case against a $21.5 million settlement between Monsanto Co. and a class of Roundup buyers who claimed the company deceived them about how much weedkiller could be made from concentrate, the court announced Friday.

  • October 11, 2019

    Chicago's Ex-Chief Judge Turns To 'Unfinished Business'

    After 25 years on the federal bench in Chicago, former Chief U.S. District Judge Rubén Castillo is returning to private practice as a man with a mission, ready to tackle "unfinished business."

  • October 11, 2019

    Firms Want $2M In Fees For Quantum Accounting Settlement

    Kirby McInerney and Glancy Prongay & Murray asked a California federal court Thursday for roughly $2 million in fees for their efforts securing a tentative $8 million from data storage company Quantum Corp. to resolve a shareholder lawsuit over its accounting practices.

  • October 11, 2019

    ICE Still Violating Immigrants' Due Process, Mass. Judge Says

    U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement is still routinely violating the legal process for examining whether detained immigrants should be released, a Massachusetts federal judge concluded Friday after questioning an ICE official as part of a lawsuit brought by a class of immigrants and their U.S. citizen spouses.

  • October 11, 2019

    US Foods, Disney Object To $135M Deal In Truck Engine Row

    Disney and U.S. Foods are among truck fleet owners objecting to a $135 million settlement between Navistar Inc. and a proposed class of truck buyers, saying the deal is inadequate and unfair because it fails to compensate them for the diminished market value of trucks with defective diesel engines.

  • October 11, 2019

    Investors Fight Bid To Ax Suit Alleging College App Fraud

    Shareholders accusing a China-based education company of ghostwriting college applications said Thursday that rather than addressing their revamped allegations, the company's latest dismissal bid merely rehashes a judge's order tossing an old incarnation of the proposed class action.

  • October 11, 2019

    Abrams, Olshan Draw Guff For $22M Fee Bid On $47M Deal

    Abrams & Bayliss and Olshan Frome Wolosky faced pushback Thursday on a $22 million fee bid for brokering a potential $47 million deal on behalf of a putative class of investors challenging Medley Capital Corp.'s proposed tie-up with Sierra Income Corp., as the defendants cast doubt that the deal is worth that much.

  • October 11, 2019

    Fyre Fest Ticket Holders Want Ja Rule Back In $100M Suit

    Just when rapper Ja Rule thought he was out, jilted Fyre Festival ticket holders suing for $100 million are trying to pull him back in, claiming new information shows he was promoting the doomed festival even as he knew it was destined for spectacular failure.

  • October 11, 2019

    Chesapeake Tries To Shake Off Okla. Quake Damage Suit

    A Chesapeake Energy Corp. unit has told a federal court it cannot be held responsible for earthquake-related damage alleged by scores of Oklahoma residents who are suing it and a slew of other oil and gas companies in a proposed class action.

  • October 11, 2019

    Fired Workers Want Bayou Steel Ch. 11 Sent To Louisiana

    A group of employees terminated by steel mill operator Bayou Steel BD Holdings LLC shortly before it filed for Chapter 11 protection have asked a Delaware judge to transfer the bankruptcy cases to Louisiana, arguing the company has no real connections to the First State.

  • October 11, 2019

    Hyundai, Kia Set Aside $758M To End Suits Over Engine Fires

    Hyundai and its affiliate Kia on Friday said that they have earmarked up to $758 million to settle class actions over a defect that allegedly caused engines of cars in the U.S. and South Korea to burst into flames.

  • October 10, 2019

    Kessler Topaz, Prickett Jones Want In On Medley Fees

    An investor told the Delaware Chancery Court Thursday his counsel at Kessler Topaz and Prickett Jones are entitled to about $440,000 in legal costs for their help brokering an estimated $47 million deal on behalf of a putative investor class that challenged Medley Capital Corp.'s proposed complex merger with Sierra Income Corp., while also questioning the co-lead counsel's $22 million fee bid.

  • October 10, 2019

    Pinnacle Can't Boot Wage Claims From Dealers' FLSA Suit

    A Missouri federal judge on Thursday refused to let Pinnacle Entertainment off the hook for claims that it cheated table dealers out of their minimum wages by diverting money from their checks to pay their gaming license fees.

  • October 10, 2019

    Northrop Defends 401(k) As Trial Looms In ERISA Class Action

    Northrop Grumman Corp. is gearing up to stand trial next week on allegations that its 401(k) plan betrayed workers by using a costly management strategy for a risky investment fund, telling a California federal judge that the strategy made sense at the time.

  • October 10, 2019

    19 Abilify Claims Tossed As Lacking Proof In MDL Settlement

    A Florida federal judge overseeing multidistrict litigation over side effects of the antipsychotic drug Abilify dismissed another 19 individual cases Thursday as a sanction for those consumers' failures to comply with court orders following the announcement of a global settlement in February.

  • October 10, 2019

    Investors' Securities Fraud Class Claims Fall Short In Pa.

    A Pennsylvania federal judge on Wednesday axed a proposed securities class action against a semiconductor manufacturer after finding that investors failed to allege the company and a top executive had knowingly made misleading statements in financial disclosures.

  • October 10, 2019

    Ariz. Can't Intervene In Pressure Cooker Deal, 6th Circ. Says

    The Sixth Circuit on Thursday shot down the state of Arizona's attempt to intervene in a settlement involving coupons in a class action over allegedly defective pressure cookers, rejecting the attorney general's arguments that it's acting on behalf of its citizens in an unfair deal.

  • October 10, 2019

    ICE Releases Three Immigrants In US Citizen Spouse Suit

    U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement agreed Thursday to release three undocumented immigrants who have U.S. citizen spouses as a Massachusetts federal judge grilled ICE officials about the process they use to determine whether to keep immigrants jailed as they pursue green cards.

  • October 10, 2019

    Court Told Settlement Is The Best Result For Purdue Ch. 11

    Bankrupt opioid maker Purdue Pharma LP again touted its proposed settlement of opioid litigation in a New York bankruptcy court Thursday and claimed individual lawsuits against it and company owners the Sackler family could destroy the value of the estate.

  • October 10, 2019

    Domino's Pizza Franchisee Reaches Deal In Driver Wage Suit

    An Illinois Domino's Pizza franchisee has agreed to pay roughly $800,000 to settle a collective action accusing it of underpaying pizza delivery drivers in violation of the Fair Labor Standards Act.

  • October 10, 2019

    Student Loan Servicer Accused Of Mishandling Overpayments

    A Wisconsin-based student loan servicer misrepresents the way it allocates excess payments from borrowers on income-based repayment plans, an Illinois borrower claimed Thursday.

Expert Analysis

  • 10th Circ. Cannabis Ruling Follows Federal Regulation Trend

    Author Photo

    The analytical framework of the Tenth Circuit’s decision in Kenney v. Helix TCS — that cannabis employers are not excused from the Fair Labor Standards Act — may interest courts across the country, as it continues the trend of extending federal law to the cannabis industry in ways that coexist with the Controlled Substances Act, says Aaron Colby of Davis Wright.

  • Series

    Judging A Book: Jackson Reviews 'When Should Law Forgive?'

    Author Photo

    Readers of Martha Minow's new book "When Should Law Forgive?" will be exposed to a refreshingly robust vision of justice that transcends myopic perspectives of wrongdoing and punishment, says U.S. District Judge Ketanji Brown Jackson of the District of Columbia.

  • And Now A Word From The Panel: Too Small For An MDL?

    Author Photo

    While multidistrict litigation can be created with as few as two federal actions in two federal judicial districts, the presence of few actions tends to coincide with other factors militating against centralization, raising the bar for establishing an MDL, says Alan Rothman of Arnold & Porter.

  • Series

    Pursuing Wellness: Steps Toward A Supportive Firm Culture

    Author Photo

    As an early advocate of the American Bar Association's year-old well-being pledge, we launched an integrated program to create and sustain a supportive workplace culture with initiatives focused on raising mental health awareness, embracing creativity and giving back to the community, says Casey Ryan at Reed Smith.

  • Perspectives

    Bill Limiting Forced Arbitration Is Critical To Real Justice

    Author Photo

    Real justice means having access to fair and independent courts, but that will only be a reality when Congress bans predispute, forced arbitration under federal law with the Forced Arbitration Injustice Repeal Act, which passed the House on Friday, says Patrice Simms at Earthjustice.

  • Series

    Pursuing Wellness: Mental Health Education As A Firm Priority

    Author Photo

    Our firm drives a holistic concept of well-being through educational opportunities, such as a series of expert-led workshops intended to address mental health and substance abuse issues that we vowed to fight when we signed the American Bar Association's well-being pledge one year ago, says Krista Logelin at Morgan Lewis.

  • Series

    Pursuing Wellness: A Firm's Work With Mental Health Experts

    Author Photo

    Signing the American Bar Association's well-being pledge last year was a natural progression of our firm's commitment to employee wellness, which has included developing partnerships with professionals in the mental health space to provide customized programming to firm attorneys and staff, say Annette Sciallo and Mark Goldberg at Latham.

  • Marriott Order Good News For Cybersecurity Class Action Bar

    Author Photo

    A Maryland federal judge's recent decree ordering Marriott to release a crucial third-party report revealing key details about how a data breach occurred could have significant ramifications for plaintiffs filing class actions following breaches of customer data at other companies, says cybersecurity consultant John Reed Stark.

  • The State Of TCPA Litigation 1 Year After Marks V. Crunch

    Author Photo

    The Ninth Circuit's 2018 decision in Marks v. Crunch, interpreting the Telephone Consumer Protection Act to cover any dialer that calls from a stored list of numbers automatically, has been applied by district courts all around the country, but one year later, its impact appears to be faltering, says Eric Troutman of Squire Patton.

  • Series

    Pursuing Wellness: When A Firm Brings Counseling On Site

    Author Photo

    One year ago, our firm signed the American Bar Association's well-being pledge and embraced a commitment to providing on-site behavioral health resources, which has since become a key aspect of our well-being program, say Meg Meserole and Kimberly Merkel at Akin Gump.

  • Series

    Pursuing Wellness: Inside A Firm Meditation Program

    Author Photo

    After our firm signed the American Bar Association’s well-being pledge one year ago, we launched two key programs that included weekly meditation sessions and monthly on-site chair massages to help people address both the mental and physical aspects of working at a law firm, says Marci Eisenstein at Schiff Hardin.

  • Consumer Class Standing Faces Uncertainty In 11th Circ.

    Author Photo

    An eventual resolution of whether unnamed class members are required to establish Article III standing by the Eleventh Circuit, together with its recent Telephone Consumer Protection Act decision in Salcedo v. Hanna, may alter the continued viability of TCPA class actions, as well as class claims brought under other consumer protection laws, say attorneys at Stumphauzer Foslid.

  • Early Sampling Of Electronic Info Is Underutilized In Discovery

    Author Photo

    The early and prompt provision of samples from all electronically stored information sources as a part of ESI protocol search methodology is consistent with the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure and may allow for significant cost savings during discovery, says Zachary Caplan at Berger Montague.

  • Opinion

    PG&E Bankruptcy Will Test Shareholder Capitalism

    Author Photo

    If the Pacific Gas and Electric bankruptcy allows for the underestimation of tort creditors' claims to leave value for existing shareholders, it will represent an enormous failure that would call into question the fairness of our shareholder capitalism system, says researcher J.B. Heaton.

  • Calif. Privacy Law Could Alter Litigation Risks Nationwide

    Author Photo

    Perhaps the greatest challenge to businesses covered by the California Consumer Privacy Act is that the CCPA creates a private right of action, with substantial statutory damages, a change that will likely reset data breach litigation risks in California as well as the rest of the country, say attorneys at Alston & Bird.

Can't find the article you're looking for? Click here to search the Class Action archive.