Class Action

  • June 22, 2017

    Investors Call Coworking Startup Bar Works A Ponzi Scheme

    Bar Works, a startup that purports to be in the shared-workspace business, is now the subject of at least two lawsuits from investors who call it a multimillion-dollar Ponzi scheme.

  • June 22, 2017

    More Than 30 Auto Parts Makers Hit With Antitrust Suits

    A group of companies that own automobile dealerships across the country sued more than 30 auto parts manufacturers in at least a dozen lawsuits filed Wednesday and Thursday as part of the sprawling multidistrict litigation in Michigan federal court over alleged price-fixing in the auto parts industry.

  • June 22, 2017

    Another Sempra Gas Leak Investor Suit Is Tossed, For Now

    A California federal judge on Tuesday tossed allegations that Sempra Energy and subsidiary SoCalGas misled shareholders by hiding the strain facing their infrastructure ahead of the massive Aliso Canyon natural gas leak, saying investors had failed to show specific evidence of deception.

  • June 22, 2017

    2nd Circ. Urged To Put Big Banks Back In ERISA Forex Suit

    A proposed class of retirement plan beneficiaries and others on Thursday asked the Second Circuit to revive claims against Credit Suisse, Deutsche Bank and other banks accusing them of violating the Employee Retirement Income Security Act by foreign exchange market-rigging, saying the banks were ERISA fiduciaries.

  • June 22, 2017

    Vineyard's $6M Wage Deal Nears OK With Cut Attys' Fees

    A California magistrate judge has recommended approving Giumarra Vineyards Corp.’s $6.1 million deal that would resolve a class action claiming the vineyard didn’t provide field workers with meal breaks or reimburse them for tools, but recommended reducing the requested attorneys’ fees from $2.15 million to $1.5 million.

  • June 22, 2017

    TCPA Bars Nixing Consent Given In Contracts, 2nd Circ. Says

    The Second Circuit on Thursday affirmed the dismissal of a putative class action accusing Lincoln Automotive Financial Services of violating the Telephone Consumer Protection Act, saying the man suing the company consented to receive calls when he signed his car lease.

  • June 22, 2017

    Cogent Communications Gets OK For $3M Class OT Deal

    A California federal judge on Thursday granted preliminary approval to Cogent Communications’ $3 million deal to end class action claims that the internet provider shorted the overtime payments of over 300 workers and purposely kept them in the dark about the state’s labor laws.

  • June 22, 2017

    Honda Asks To Use Takata Guilty Plea In Its Air Bag Defense

    American Honda Motor Co. on Wednesday asked the Florida federal court overseeing the multidistrict litigation over Takata’s potentially deadly air bags to let it use Takata’s criminal guilty plea as part of its defense, saying that the facts therein are crucial to its arguments.

  • June 22, 2017

    2 Bellwethers Selected Against Lilly In Testosterone MDL

    The Illinois federal judge overseeing multidistrict litigation against manufacturers of testosterone replacement therapy drugs on Thursday selected the first two cases that will go to trial against Eli Lilly and Co.

  • June 22, 2017

    7th Circ. Upholds Cert. Of Foundry Worker OT Class

    The Seventh Circuit on Thursday upheld the certification of two classes of Wisconsin iron foundry workers who say a Hitachi-owned foundry operator violated state law and the Fair Labor Standards Act by not paying for the time workers spend decontaminating themselves after their day is done.

  • June 22, 2017

    Immigrants Win Cert. In USCIS Application Policy Challenge

    A Washington federal judge on Wednesday certified a class of potentially thousands of immigrants in a challenge to a little-known U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services program that civil rights groups say delays application processing and unlawfully targets Muslim applicants.

  • June 22, 2017

    Purchasers Seek Cert. In Alere Blood Monitor Suit

    Consumers suing Alere Inc. over allegedly defective home blood-clot testing kits asked a California federal judge Wednesday for class certification in multiple states.

  • June 22, 2017

    5th Circ. Panel Won’t Revisit BP Formula On Deepwater Claims

    A Fifth Circuit panel on Wednesday denied a request by BP PLC to revisit the decision rejecting most of the formula the oil giant used to determine the settlement it will pay a class of Gulf Coast businesses harmed by 2010’s Deepwater Horizon disaster, saying the company’s argument was wrong.

  • June 22, 2017

    9th Circ. Allows Sailors' $1B Fukushima Suit To Proceed

    The Ninth Circuit on Thursday upheld a lower court’s decision to allow sailors to pursue their $1 billion lawsuit against Tokyo Electric Power Co. over radiation injuries they allegedly suffered during their response to the 2011 Fukushima nuclear disaster.

  • June 22, 2017

    Show Me Lab Tests, Judge In Trader Joe's Truffle Tussle Says

    A would-be class of aggrieved gourmets was ordered Thursday by a Manhattan federal judge to add lab tests to a suit alleging grocery giant Trader Joe Co. hawks fake black truffle olive oil to unwitting shoppers.

  • June 21, 2017

    Bard Investors Sue To Stop $24B Becton Dickinson Merger

    A C.R. Bard Inc. investor filed a proposed class action in New Jersey federal court Wednesday aiming to block the medical supply company’s sale to Becton Dickinson and Co., claiming the $24 billion price tag is too low and that investors haven’t been given enough information to evaluate the deal.

  • June 21, 2017

    Korean Ramen Cos. Seek End To Price-Fixing Class Action

    Two Korean ramen noodle companies asked a California federal judge Wednesday to toss a class action accusing them of participating in a price-fixing scheme, saying they weren’t involved in a conspiracy and that even if they were, the conduct only affected prices in Korea, not the U.S.

  • June 21, 2017

    Justice Sotomayor On The Power Of Dissent

    Justice Sonia Sotomayor discusses her views on writing dissents and the change she hopes they inspire in the law, in the second of two articles based on an exclusive interview with the 111th justice.

  • June 21, 2017

    Whistleblowers, MDL Plaintiffs Object To $32M SunEd Deal

    Two former SunEdison Inc. officers with pending whistleblower suits against the bankrupt solar energy giant and the lead plaintiffs in a Securities Act multidistrict litigation have asked the New York bankruptcy court overseeing the case for assurances that their suits won’t be affected by a recent $32 million settlement with unsecured creditors.

  • June 21, 2017

    Genworth Agrees To $20M Settlement In Suit Over Unit's IPO

    Genworth Financial Inc. has agreed to pay $20 million to settle claims from a class of investors that it concealed poor market conditions prior to its Australian insurance unit’s initial public offering, according to documents filed in New York federal court on Wednesday.

Expert Analysis

  • Opinion

    Justice Kennedy's Moderating Influence On The High Court

    Nan Aron

    With the conclusion of this U.S. Supreme Court term just around the corner, the guessing game around Justice Anthony Kennedy’s possible retirement is reaching a crescendo. Yet the speculation does more than fuel bookmakers’ odds. It draws attention to his pivotal role as the court’s swing vote, says Nan Aron, president of Alliance for Justice.

  • The Shrinking Doctrine Of Specific Personal Jurisdiction

    Grant Esposito

    The U.S. Supreme Court's decision in Bristol-Myers Squibb v. Superior Court of California reaffirmed a causation requirement between a plaintiff’s claims and the defendant’s in-state conduct. After this ruling, the test for specific personal jurisdiction is simple: File suit where the defendant did something significant that caused the claim to arise, say attorneys with Morrison & Foerster LLP.

  • Tax Deductibility And Statutory Damages — A Waiting Trap

    Peter Robbins

    Statutory damages guarantee a minimum recovery in each individual case where a violation may cause only nominal damage. But aggregated statutory damages in class actions can create a risk of staggeringly large awards, which may not be tax-deductible. Companies must know the law and take steps to minimize tax consequences, says Peter Robbins of Corbett & Robbins LLP.

  • Weekly Column

    Innovating For Wise Juries: Juror-Posed Questions

    Roy Futterman

    One way to combat juror confusion and boredom is to allow jurors to ask witnesses questions. No federal evidentiary or court rule prohibits it, and every federal circuit court to address the practice has held it permissible, say Stephen Susman, Richard Lorren Jolly and Dr. Roy Futterman of the NYU School of Law Civil Jury Project.

  • Tough Times For Forum Shoppers

    Lawrence Ebner

    A trio of rulings from the U.S. Supreme Court has made this a difficult spring for forum-shopping lawyers. TC Heartland, BNSF Railway and now Bristol-Myers Squibb have enforced limits on exercise of personal jurisdiction over corporate defendants, sending an unmistakable message to lower courts, says Lawrence Ebner of Capital Appellate Advocacy PLLC.

  • Resh Exposes Defendants To Serial Class Cert. Relitigation

    Peter Hawkes

    The Ninth Circuit’s decision in Resh v. China Agritech opens the door to the possibility of serial, successive attempts to certify a class in securities and other cases, potentially exposing defendants to an almost never-ending series of class actions, says Peter Hawkes of Lane Powell PC.

  • What DOJ Investigation Means For Generic Drug Plaintiffs

    Jason Dubner

    Last month, over 80 named plaintiffs whose antitrust claims were consolidated in Philadelphia learned that discovery in their cases will be stayed until August pending a U.S. Department of Justice investigation into the generic pharmaceutical industry. Despite the delay, plaintiffs can use the next several months productively to strengthen their cases, say attorneys with Butler Rubin Saltarelli & Boyd and Adams Holcomb LLP.

  • How Science Days Are Changing Talc Litigation

    David Schwartz

    Tutorials in the form of “science days” are an increasingly common way for judges to learn more about the science behind litigation over medical and consumer products and chemical exposures. The science day held recently by a California state court judge overseeing talcum powder litigation provides valuable insights into the process, say David Schwartz of Innovative Science Solutions LLC and attorney Nathan Schachtman.

  • Tips For Complying With ABA’s New Encryption Guidance

    Nick Holda

    Last month, the American Bar Association published revised guidance regarding an attorney’s duty to protect sensitive client material in light of recent high-profile hacks. The first step in compliance is understanding how your data is being stored and accessed. There are three key questions you should ask your firm’s information technology staff and/or external solution vendors, says Nick Holda of PreVeil.

  • Series

    My Strangest Day In Court: When I Did Nothing And Won

    Mark Morris

    After looking at all of the factual nuances associated with proving a constructive trust, I hit upon a strategy that I had never used before — namely, do nothing, say nothing and hope the IRS fails in its proof, recalls Mark Morris of Snell & Wilmer LLP.