Commercial Litigation UK

  • November 11, 2022

    Law Firm Manager Fined Over Legal Aid Payments

    The Solicitors Disciplinary Tribunal has fined a law firm's owner and its compliance officer for misusing money received from the Legal Aid Agency for professional disbursements.

  • November 11, 2022

    Polish Private Jet Worker Loses Bias Suit Over 'Gypsy' Remark

    An employment tribunal has ruled that a Polish analyst at a charter jet company did not suffer from racial harassment or discrimination when a colleague referred to him as a "gypsy" on numerous occasions.

  • November 11, 2022

    Former Goldman Banker Settles £20M Whistleblowing Suit

    A former employee of Goldman Sachs International has reached a settlement in his £20 million (£23 million) whistleblowing lawsuit against the bank after accusing it of breaking financial regulations.

  • November 11, 2022

    AA Boss Sues Lawyers Over Lost 'Fracas In A Bar' Lawsuit

    A former motoring organization executive who was fired over a "fracas in a bar" accused his former solicitors at the start of a trial on Friday of negligently failing him when he sued his former employer, causing him to lose hundreds of thousands in legal fees.

  • November 11, 2022

    Teva Wins Challenge To Novartis' Blood Transfusion Patent

    Generic drug manufacturer Teva has succeeded in its bid to invalidate two patents owned by Novartis AG, as a London court found that the pharmaceutical giant's intellectual property for a blood transfusion medicine lacked novelty.

  • November 11, 2022

    E-File Deadlines Run Til Midnight, Appeals Court Rules

    The Court of Appeal assured commercial litigators on Friday that traditional close-of-business deadlines do not apply to documents filed electronically after a software license reseller tried to argue that Microsoft had missed an opening to challenge its £270 million ($306 million) antitrust suit.

  • November 11, 2022

    Court Backs FCA Petition To Wind Up 8 Investment Firms

    The Financial Conduct Authority said Friday that the High Court has ordered the winding up of eight linked financial services firms that offered investment services beyond the credit broking permissions the watchdog gave them, which posed significant risk to consumers.

  • November 11, 2022

    UK Litigation Roundup: Here's What You Missed In London

    The past week in London has seen pharmaceutical giant Teva begin a new patent claim against rival Bayer, car parts manufacturer Denso sued by Jaguar Land Rover in a competition claim, and Jeremy Corbyn's former executive director of Leader of the Opposition's Office sue the Times Newspaper in a defamation case.

  • November 11, 2022

    Personal Injury Test Cases Go Straight To Appeals Court

    The Court of Appeal is due to hear a test case within weeks that experts hope will close a major legal loophole created by the government's controversial "whiplash" personal injury reform.

  • November 10, 2022

    Former Cleary Gottlieb Competition Law Pioneer Dies

    Cleary Gottlieb Steen & Hamilton LLP is mourning the loss of its former longtime competition practice leader who joined the firm's Brussels office in 2000 and led the practice for the next 15 years.

  • November 10, 2022

    Investment Fund Partly Loses Fight To Hide Clients' Identities

    There is no basis for a "zone of privacy" around litigants' identities in English law, an appeals court ruled Thursday, largely rejecting an investment vehicle's battle to conceal the identities of the people instructing its lawyers in a $100 million lawsuit against Credit Suisse.

  • November 10, 2022

    NCA Investigator's Firing Over Comments Ruled Reasonable

    The National Crime Agency was not unreasonable when it decided to dismiss an analyst accused of making racist comments about Muslim countries during a cultural awareness training, the Employment Tribunal has ruled.

  • November 10, 2022

    Ex-BP Trader Loses Whistleblowing Claim Over Africa Deals

    An employment tribunal ruled that a former oil trader at BP PLC was fairly dismissed after he raised concerns about the multinational giant using local agents in Nigeria to secure contracts with the country's state-owned oil company.

  • November 10, 2022

    Aviva Says Hotel Chain Fell Short On Safety In Fire Suit

    Building insurer Aviva says it doesn't have to pay out more than £6.2 million ($7.2 million) in damages to Britannia Hotels following a fire, claiming the U.K. chain failed to comply with its insurance policy.

  • November 10, 2022

    Charles Russell Brings On Sports Law Veteran

    Charles Russell Speechlys has announced its hire of a veteran Swiss attorney with a background in commercial sports law, including a stint working for world soccer's top governing body, to serve as a Zurich-based partner within the British law firm's sports team.

  • November 10, 2022

    Appeals Court To Weigh What Counts As Insured Loss

    A London appeals court is set to weigh in for the first time on what the definition of an insured loss is for the purposes of professional indemnity coverage, as Royal & Sun Alliance fights to avoid paying out to a Northern Irish law firm in its dispute with Brown Rudnick.

  • November 10, 2022

    Ex-Exec Sues Cannabis Biz For £1.8M Unpaid Compensation

    A businesswoman is suing a publicly listed medical cannabis company, saying it owes her compensation after firing her because she allegedly refused to stop making decisions on behalf of a subsidiary without the chief executive's approval.

  • November 10, 2022

    Barclays Hits Back Over Role In Breast Implant Fraud

    Lawyers for Barclays told a London court on Thursday that it is almost "impossible" to claim that the lender acted dishonestly during the restructuring of an insolvent medical company in a scheme to shield compensation from women given defective breast implants.

  • November 10, 2022

    Cartel Truckmakers Can Be Asked For New Evidence

    Buyers can ask truckmakers involved in a cartel to produce new evidence to help quantify damages in compensation claims brought against them, the European Union's top court ruled Thursday.

  • November 10, 2022

    Fake Dr. Dre Gig Promoters Forgot About Debt, Lender Says

    An investment management group told a London court on Thursday that the directors of a music promoter used a separate business account as "a personal piggy bank" as the firm sues for £2.2 million ($2.6 million) over the financing of Dr. Dre gigs that never happened.

  • November 10, 2022

    Bank Of Asia Chief Can't Retry Share Disclosure Ruling

    A company that belonged to a Bank of Asia co-founder violated its contract to give an American executive the equivalent of 22% interest in the bank's founding project, the top court for Britain's overseas territories ruled on Thursday.

  • November 09, 2022

    Barclays Accused Of Helping Defraud Breast Implant Victims

    Women who received dangerous breast implants and other creditors of an insolvent health care company accused Barclays and a U.K. law firm at trial Wednesday of participating in a scheme to restructure the business so it could avoid paying millions in compensation.

  • November 09, 2022

    Sex Bias Payout Upheld Despite Lack Of Benefit Claim

    An employment tribunal has ruled that an account manager's compensation for her successful sex discrimination claim against a car finance broker should not be reduced simply because she did not apply for a state benefit after she lost her job.

  • November 09, 2022

    Former Deutsche Bank Exec Says Discrimination Behind Exit

    A former Deutsche Bank executive accused the bank of discriminating against her by pretending to find her a new role before firing as the employment tribunal trial over her allegations wrapped Wednesday.

  • November 09, 2022

    Nokia Wins Patent Suit Over Oppo's Smartphones

    A London court ruled Wednesday that Chinese smartphone company Oppo and its subsidiary OnePlus have infringed a standard-essential patent owned by Nokia for wireless communications with a version of the technology that has since been replaced, the latest win for the Finnish telecom giant.

Expert Analysis

  • Changes To UK Competition Rules Will Extend CMA Powers

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    Recent amendments to U.K. competition and consumer law regimes introduce changes to merger control and antitrust investigations that will result in the speedier resolution of cases and greater autonomy for the Competition and Markets Authority, say Bill Batchelor and Aurora Luoma at Skadden.

  • Sheeran Ruling Raises Burden For Copyright Plaintiffs

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    In requiring proof of access, rather than proof of the possibility of access, the U.K. High Court’s decision in Ed Sheeran’s recent copyright case will provide some security to those in the music industry, say David Fink and Armound Ghoorchian at Venable.

  • J5 Warning Highlights Growing Risk Of NFT-Related Crime

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    As NFTs increase in popularity, so does the risk of such assets being used by those looking to exploit them for criminal gain, as illustrated by the Joint Chiefs of Global Tax Enforcement's recent warning of the possible dangers, says Syed Rahman at Rahman Ravelli.

  • Litigants Eager To Prove The Song Remains The Same

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    Recent lawsuits against Ed Sheeran and Dua Lipa, alleging their hit songs infringed others' copyrights, suggest that, despite the difficulty of proving musical plagiarism has occurred, the appetite for this type of litigation may be growing, says Nick Eziefula at Simkins.

  • ECJ Ruling Strengthens German Patent Owners' Rights

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    Following the European Court of Justice's recent ruling in Phoenix Contact, it is expected that German courts will issue more preliminary injunctions in patent cases, making Germany, and particularly Munich, an even more attractive venue for patent enforcement, says Sandra Mueller at Squire Patton.

  • Court Decisions Render Paris Less Appealing For Arbitration

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    The Paris Court of Appeal recently set aside two arbitral awards on the grounds that the tribunals lacked jurisdiction due to incompatibility with EU law, so investors seeking to minimize obstacles in the recognition or enforcement of awards may not choose Paris as their seat for investor-state arbitration, says Tomas Vail at Vail Dispute Resolution.

  • Coca-Cola Case Offers Anti-Bribery Compliance Lessons

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    A recent Southwark Crown Court bribery case involving a former Coca-Cola manager and three companies highlights the importance of robust compliance procedures and the need for companies to be aware of the actions of employees and third parties in day-to-day operations, say attorneys at Kennedys.

  • Where Data Class Actions Stand Post-Lloyd

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    Although last year's U.K. Supreme Court decision of Lloyd v. Google was a win for data controllers and a significant setback for claimant law firms and litigation funders, it did not close the door on class actions for data breaches or rule out the possibility of using antitrust collective proceedings instead to bring opt-out privacy claims, say attorneys at Travers Smith.

  • What EU Corporate Sustainability Plan Means For Contracts

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    The EU's proposed directive on corporate sustainability due diligence would have a significant impact on contractual assurances in relation to human rights and environmental impacts, says Francois Holmey at Carter-Ruck.

  • When Investment Funds Are Not As Green As They Suggest

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    With the growing demand for funds that offer sustainable investment, there is increasing potential to discover that funds have misled investors, which in certain situations could result in a claim for legal redress for misselling, say attorneys at Keller Lenkner.

  • Cayman Courts Are Reluctant To Strike Out Proceedings

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    Applications to strike out proceedings have become increasingly common in the Cayman Islands, but as a recent case demonstrates, it is difficult to fulfill the required criteria, and they should therefore be filed sparingly, says Conal Keane at Appleby.

  • Latest Song Copyright Rulings Clarify What's Protectable

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    Recent copyright infringement decisions in favor of musicians Ed Sheeran, Katy Perry and Led Zeppelin should help turn the tide against frivolous music copyright lawsuits, says Gerald Sauer at Sauer & Wagner.

  • Force Majeure Lessons From 2 COVID Rulings

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    Without a general legal principle of force majeure in English law, two recent High Court cases highlight the importance of careful drafting to mitigate pandemic risk and show how courts may reach different legal conclusions depending on contract construction, say Ryland Ash and Henry Stockley at Watson Farley.

  • UK Ruling Is A Win For Fraud Victims At Banks' Expense

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    The U.K. Court of Appeal's decision in Philipp v. Barclays holds banks potentially liable for executing any payment that is suspected to be fraudulent, heightening already significant pressure on banks to identify and prevent fraud, say attorneys at Signature Litigation.

  • Latest Commercial Court Guide Reflects A Shifting Landscape

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    While the latest version of the Commercial Court Guide focuses on the future of litigation both culturally and practically, the guide covers many aspects of litigation procedure, some of which arguably signal shifting dynamics prompted by the COVID-19 pandemic, says Elizabeth Warwick at King & Spalding.

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