Competition

  • June 22, 2006

    FCC Ruling On Adelphia Sale Expected By Mid-July

    Within the next few weeks, regulators expect to complete their review of Adelphia Communications Corp.’s plan to sell its assets to Time Warner Inc. and Comcast Corp., bringing the company one step closer to the end of a long stay in Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection.

  • June 22, 2006

    U.K. Court Rejects Extradition Challenge

    In a decision that could have far-reaching implications for antitrust cases, Britain’s House of Lords has dismissed a petition from the retired chief executive of Morgan Crucible Co. to review a law aimed at hastening the extradition of defendants to the U.S.

  • June 22, 2006

    DOJ Alters Proposed Energy Merger

    The Justice Department may have driven two major Mid-Atlantic utilities to sell several plants by filing a suit Thursday that threatens to derail their $16 billion merger.

  • June 21, 2006

    Hearings Focus On When And How To Regulate Single Firms

    The key to regulating anti-competitive behavior by single firms is drawing a distinct line between healthy competition and threatening, exclusionary acts, said Federal Trade Commission Chairman Deborah Platt Majoras.

  • June 21, 2006

    Bush Repeals Rule On Student Loan Consolidation

    In a move to stimulate competition in the student consolidation loan market, President George W. Bush has repealed a rule that compelled borrowers who have all of their student loans with a single lender to consolidate with that lender.

  • June 21, 2006

    Stolt To Petition Landmark Case To Supreme Court

    Stolt-Nielsen isn't giving up without a fight. The global transportation company said Wednesday it would appeal its landmark antitrust case to the U.S. Supreme Court after losing a request for a rehearing "en banc" at the Third Circuit.

  • June 21, 2006

    FCC Launches Review Of Media Ownership Rules

    The Federal Communications Commission voted on Wednesday to revisit its media ownership restrictions, in what is likely to turn into a contentious debate over the amount of media outlets large companies are allowed to control.

  • June 21, 2006

    State Appeals Costco’s Win In Liquor Regulation Case

    Firing back at a federal judge’s earlier decision in the ongoing Costco litigation, the Washington State Liquor Control Board is refusing to step away from a case that pits federal antitrust laws against the state’s right to regulate alcohol.

  • June 21, 2006

    Oil Companies Fined €315.4M

    Italian antitrust regulators have fined six oil companies, including subsidiaries of Exxon and Shell, a total of €315.4 million—$396.6 million—for an arrangement among the companies to supply jet fuel to airports.

  • June 20, 2006

    Shareholder Suit Against Stolt-Nielsen Will Proceed

    Beleaguered transportation and storage company Stolt-Nielsen SA will not be able to cross a shareholder lawsuit off its list of legal worries, after a judge denied the company’s motion to dismiss the class action.

  • June 20, 2006

    FTC Lifts Ban On Liberty Stake In Time Warner

    Removing a ban initially imposed on Liberty Media to preserve competition in the cable market, the U.S. Federal Trade Commission has cleared the way for the Time Warner Inc. shareholder to vote its minority stake in the media and entertainment giant.

  • June 20, 2006

    E.C. Launches Antitrust Inquiry Into SkyTeam

    Air carriers Delta, Continental and Northwest are being eyed by the European Commission over possible antitrust violations stemming from their alliance with seven other airlines in Europe and Asia.

  • June 20, 2006

    Supreme Court Declines To Hear Appeal In "Tying" Brawl

    Claims of anti-competitive behavior have fallen on deaf ears, with the U.S. Supreme Court refusing to take on the appeal of a decision favoring U.S. Philips Corp. in a long and messy fight over “tying” patents to CD-ROM technology licenses.

  • June 20, 2006

    Exxon, BP Survive Antitrust Scare

    An antitrust lawsuit against BP Plc. and ExxonMobil Corp. was dismissed Monday by a district court judge in Alaska, who ruled that the oil giants did not break the law by refusing to sell natural gas to a rival group or by teaming up with ConocoPhillips to negotiate the building of their own $20 billion natural gas pipeline.

  • June 20, 2006

    Fed Up With Low Wages, Nurses Target Hospitals

    As the American health care system faces skyrocketing costs and a growing nursing shortage, a group of nurses is taking aim at a slew of hospital systems in four federal class actions filed this week, accusing the hospitals of putting their bottom line ahead of fair wages by conspiring to keep nurses' salaries at artificially low levels.

  • June 20, 2006

    Three Gas Traders Admit To Price Manipulation

    A federal investigation into price manipulation in the natural gas markets continues to net guilty pleas, with three more traders admitting to organizing a conspiracy to skew the price of natural gas.

  • June 19, 2006

    Airbus Poised To Request State Aid

    Aircraft manufacturer Airbus may soon ask for state aid in order to complete its A380 plane on time, a request that would add fuel to the already intense debate between the United States and the European Union over subsidies given to Airbus and rival Boeing Corp.

  • June 19, 2006

    E.C. Probes Gaz de France, Suez Deal

    The European Commission has decided to take an in-depth look at the proposed merger between French energy companies Gaz de France and Suez SA, after twice postponing approval of the deal.

  • June 19, 2006

    Supreme Court Looks To Solicitor General In IPO Case

    The U.S. Supreme Court has asked the Bush administration to weigh in on whether shareholders should be able to file antitrust claims against the world’s leading investment banks over their role in initial public offerings.

  • June 19, 2006

    U.K. Plans To Keep Spotlight On MasterCard Fees

    Although it has dropped its original action against MasterCard, the Office of Fair Trading said it plans to carry on with its six-year investigation into the credit card association’s interchange fees for allegedly violating competition laws in the European Union and United Kingdom.