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Competition

  • August 14, 2018

    How One Firm Moved The Needle On Disability Inclusion

    This global law firm has recently focused on creating opportunities for people with disabilities across its ranks, and its efforts are already showing results.

  • August 14, 2018

    CFIUS Reform Is No Death Knell For Chinese Buyers

    A newly signed law overhauling the Committee on Foreign Investment in the United States has sparked concern in China, but concerns that the country would face tougher reviews than it has in the past are likely unfounded.

  • August 14, 2018

    DOJ Taps Ex-AG Mukasey To Monitor Bayer-Monsanto Deal

    A D.C. district judge on Tuesday appointed former U.S. Attorney General and district court chief judge Michael B. Mukasey to serve as the monitoring trustee for the U.S. Department of Justice agreement that allowed Bayer AG's planned $62 billion purchase of Monsanto Co. to proceed.

  • August 14, 2018

    Amicus Briefs Back DOJ On AT&T-Time Warner Appeal

    A slew of law professors and interest groups, as well as the Federal Communications Commission, largely supported the government’s case Monday in filings with the D.C. Circuit as the U.S. Department of Justice appeals its loss in the AT&T-Time Warner merger challenge.

  • August 14, 2018

    NCAA, Players Can Use O'Bannon Evidence In Antitrust Trial

    The California federal judge who will try claims the NCAA illegally prevents athletes from being paid beyond their scholarships said Monday she will admit evidence from the landmark O'Bannon case, overriding multiple objections from both the sports body and the students.

  • August 14, 2018

    DC Circ. Upholds DOT's Order On Slots At Mexican Airport

    A D.C. Circuit panel on Tuesday grounded a challenge from low-cost Mexican airline Interjet that contested a U.S. Department of Transportation allocation of lucrative Mexico City airport takeoff and landing slots, concluding that the DOT didn't improperly try to make decisions that were up to the Mexican government, as Interjet had claimed.

  • August 13, 2018

    David Boies On How Dyslexia Shaped His Practice

    One of the country’s highest-profile litigators, the Boies Schiller Flexner LLP chairman was diagnosed with dyslexia when he was in his 30s. In an interview with Law360, he talks about practicing law with the learning disability.

  • August 13, 2018

    BigLaw’s Mental Health Stigma Shows Signs Of Fading

    Sometimes viewed as an “invisible” disability, mental illness has long been forced under wraps because of the risk attorneys could face bias and stigma. Here’s how lawyers, law firms and other groups are starting to take on the status quo.

  • August 13, 2018

    5 State AGs Argue Against $62B Bayer-Monsanto Deal

    In opposition to Bayer AG’s planned $62 billion acquisition of Monsanto Co., the attorneys general of California, Iowa, Massachusetts, Mississippi and Oregon sent a comment letter to the U.S. Department of Justice, arguing that the deal would concentrate an already narrow seed market and threaten innovation.

  • August 13, 2018

    Farmers, Dairy Co-Op Reach $40M Deal To End Milk Price Suit

    A California federal court was asked Monday to approve a $40 million settlement to resolve putative claims for tens of thousands of dairy farms alleging that cooperative DairyAmerica Inc. and affiliate California Dairies conspired to boost profits by lowballing milk prices paid to farmers.

  • August 13, 2018

    FTC Overstepped In Shire FDA Petitions Case, 3rd Circ. Told

    The Federal Trade Commission exceeded its authority in bringing a lawsuit that alleges a Shire PLC unit abused the U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s citizen petition process to delay generic competition for its antibiotic Vancocin and is overstating potential consequences of the lower court’s dismissal, the Washington Legal Foundation has told the Third Circuit.

  • August 13, 2018

    Thales Extends $5B Data Encryption Offer Amid Probes

    The Thales Group said that it has extended the acceptance period for its planned $5 billion purchase of Gemalto NV, as competition authorities in several jurisdictions give the tie-up a close look over concerns about hardware components used for data encryption.

  • August 13, 2018

    CFIUS Overhaul Signed Into Law Along With Defense Budget

    President Donald Trump signed the National Defense Authorization Act for 2019 into law on Monday, approving the federal defense budget and policy priorities for the upcoming year as well as the attached plan to overhaul the Committee on Foreign Investment in the United States.

  • August 13, 2018

    Fed. Circ. Wrong On HIV Drug Patent Challenge, Justices Hear

    A health care group told the U.S. Supreme Court it was improperly barred by the Federal Circuit from challenging a patent for an HIV drug because it had not filed an Abbreviated New Drug Application for a generic version of the drug, according to a petition for certiorari related to its request for declaratory judgment ruling the patents are invalid.

  • August 13, 2018

    Ex-Northwestern Hoops Player Drops Transfer Rule Suit

    A former college basketball player suing the NCAA for killing his career with its “year in residence” rule after he was allegedly forced off Northwestern University’s team has dropped his suit, a move that comes roughly a month after the Seventh Circuit upheld that rule in another case.

  • August 13, 2018

    Philippines' Watchdog Wins Grab Commitments For Uber Deal

    The competition enforcer for the Philippines said Friday that it has reached an agreement with Grab Inc. that will preserve competition for ride-hailing services in the country after Grab took over Uber Technologies Inc.’s Southeast Asia operations earlier this year.

  • August 13, 2018

    Mitsubishi, Hitachi To Pay $23M In Parts Price-Fixing MDL

    Hitachi Automotive Systems Ltd. and Mitsubishi Electric Corporation have agreed to pay more than $23 million combined to settle allegations in Michigan federal court that they participated in a wide-ranging global conspiracy to fix prices on automotive parts.

  • August 10, 2018

    How The Legal Industry Lets Down Lawyers With Disabilities

    The dissolution of a five-year-old bar group marks the latest setback for disabled attorneys, who often find little support while navigating an inhospitable industry.

  • August 10, 2018

    Gaining Access: Disabled Lawyers Share Their Stories

    In a series of interviews, lawyers tell Law360 how even well-intentioned professors can create barriers, how inclusivity can help a firm’s litigation prowess, and how “inspirational” can be a dirty word.

  • August 10, 2018

    Schwab Pushes Back On Banks' Latest Bid To Ax Libor Claims

    Charles Schwab Corp. on Thursday defended its revived and amended claims against a slew of the world’s largest banks over their alleged manipulation of the London Interbank Offered Rate, telling a New York federal judge that it’s tightened up its complaint enough for the case to proceed.

Expert Analysis

  • Series

    Clerking For Ginsburg: 4 Things I Learned

    Judge John Owens

    A lot has changed since I clerked for Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg 20 years ago. At that time, I had hair and no wife. I also thought I knew everything — but working for the justice made me realize very quickly that I actually knew very little, says Ninth Circuit Judge John Owens.

  • Series

    Clerking For Ginsburg: The Equality Lessons

    Margo Schlanger

    In 1993, Ruth Bader Ginsburg was confirmed to the U.S. Supreme Court, and I began my two-year clerkship with her. In her first opinion as a justice, and in dozens since, Justice Ginsburg reminded us how the law needs to operate if equality is to be a reality, says Margo Schlanger, a professor at the University of Michigan Law School.

  • How The Sports Betting Decision May Affect College Athletes

    Elizabeth McCurrach

    With the imminent possibility of widespread legalized gambling following the U.S. Supreme Court's decision in Murphy, the NCAA’s mission to protect the “amateur” athlete is exponentially harder, say Elizabeth McCurrach and Ronald Gaither of BakerHostetler.

  • Insurance Tips For 'No Poach' Employment Antitrust Claims

    Jeff Kiburtz

    Regulators are taking new and aggressive steps to address the purported use of "no poach" agreements that allegedly violate antitrust law. Apart from ensuring that current practices comply with state and federal laws, companies should make sure that their insurance policies can help mitigate risk from prior practices, say Jeff Kiburtz and Heather Habes of Covington & Burling LLP.

  • The Future Of Authenticating Audio And Video Evidence

    Jonathan Mraunac

    The recent emergence of artificial intelligence-based technology has prompted serious concerns about the future integrity of recordings. Attorneys must think critically about standards for authenticating audio and video evidence as well as legislative and regulatory safeguards to discourage pervasive manipulation and forgery, says Jonathan Mraunac of Ogletree Deakins Nash Smoak & Stewart PC.

  • Opinion

    Law360's Global 20 Doesn't Acknowledge Global Networks

    Glenn Cunningham

    While I read with interest Law360's report analyzing the top 20 global law firms of 2018, I also noticed it doesn't tell the whole story. Global networks of independent law firms compare favorably with multinational firms in terms of geographic coverage, legal expertise, and awareness of local cultures and customs, says Glenn Cunningham of Interlaw Ltd.

  • Suddenly, ALJs Become Political Appointees

    Brian Casey

    Less than three weeks after the U.S. Supreme Court decided Lucia v. Securities and Exchange Commission, President Donald Trump signed an executive order applying the court’s rationale in Lucia to the hiring — and firing — of all administrative law judges in the federal government, making them entirely beholden to the heads of their agencies or the president for their jobs, says Brian Casey of Barnes & Thornburg LLP.

  • What Kavanaugh's Writing Tells Us About His Personality

    Matthew Hall

    People with certain personality traits tend to use certain words. A computer analysis of Judge Brett Kavanaugh’s D.C. Circuit opinions reveals that he is highly extraverted, which means that he would be a prominent voice on the U.S. Supreme Court, says Matthew Hall, a professor at the University of Notre Dame.

  • Opinion

    3 Pros, 3 Cons Of Litigation Finance

    Ralph Sutton

    An educated guess puts the number of new litigation funders launched in the past 18 months at 30 — an astonishing number, with more to come. Is this a blessing to our legal system or something more akin to tulip mania? Maybe both, says Ralph Sutton, founder and CEO of litigation funding firm Validity Finance LLC.

  • AmEx Ruling May Have Big Impact On Health Insurance

    David Garcia

    There are a number of ongoing antitrust cases involving health insurance networks that may be susceptible to the type of two-sided market analysis described by the U.S. Supreme Court last month in Ohio v. American Express, say David Garcia and Nadezhda Nikonova of Sheppard Mullin Richter & Hampton LLP.