Competition

  • June 07, 2021

    Doormaker Settles Investors' Stock-Drop Claims For $40M

    A doormaker swamped with antitrust litigation has reached a nearly $40 million settlement with investors who claim the company manipulated its stock price while incurring millions in liability from a rival's lawsuit.

  • June 07, 2021

    Former DOJ Criminal Antitrust Director Joins Arnold & Porter

    Arnold & Porter said Monday it has hired the former criminal litigation director of the U.S. Department of Justice's antitrust division as a partner in its competition practice, making it the latest BigLaw firm to bolster its antitrust bench as enforcement activity ticks upward.

  • June 07, 2021

    Google Settles French Antitrust Probe For $268M

    Google will tweak its advertising technology offerings for connecting advertisers and publishers and pay a €220 million ($268.3 million) fine, under an antitrust settlement that French antitrust authorities announced Monday.

  • June 07, 2021

    Jaguar Hits Ball-Bearing Makers With Cartel Damages Suit

    Jaguar Land Rover has sued two Japanese manufacturing companies in England, seeking damages for the inflated prices the carmaker claims it paid for automotive ball bearings because they were involved in a cartel.

  • June 04, 2021

    No Antitrust Activity In Publishers' Ad Suit, Google Argues

    Google urged a California federal judge on Friday to ax a consolidated antitrust suit launched by a proposed class of publishers over Google's digital advertising business in a sprawling multidistrict litigation, arguing that the publishers failed to allege any type of antitrust violation.

  • June 04, 2021

    Google Wants Texas Antitrust Case Included In MDL

    Following a failed bid to transfer a suit led by the Texas Attorney General's Office to California, Google is pushing the Judicial Panel on Multidistrict Litigation to centralize the suit in the Golden State with more than a dozen private cases alleging the tech giant monopolizes the display advertising market.

  • June 04, 2021

    Justices Prompt FCC To Restore Trump's Media Deregulation

    The Federal Communications Commission on Friday officially reinstated several of its Trump-era decisions eliminating several media ownership controls, an anticipated move that comes in the wake of the U.S. Supreme Court's April decision upholding the 2017 deregulations.

  • June 04, 2021

    Classes Get Cert., Lose State Law Claims In Opana MDL

    An Illinois federal judge on Friday certified two classes of painkiller Opana ER purchasers in multidistrict litigation over a pay-for-delay scheme Endo Pharmaceuticals allegedly entered to keep a generic version off the shelves, but he nixed the state law claims from their case.

  • June 04, 2021

    Pa. Cement Co. $151M Merger Ditched Under FTC Challenge

    Lehigh Cement Co.'s $151 million plan to acquire one of its largest rivals in the cement market went bust Friday after the Federal Trade Commission challenged the proposed deal and raised concerns the merger would harm regional competition in the nearby gray portland cement market.

  • June 04, 2021

    Sears Says Couple Can't Run New Store At Former Site

    Sears Authorized Hometown Stores, which licenses stores that sell its merchandise on consignment, accused a married couple who oversaw a Sears Hometown store of breaching their agreement and profiting off of the SAHS name after they opened a competing appliance store at the same location as the former Sears store.

  • June 04, 2021

    Door Buyers' Attys Get $20.5M Cut Of $61M Price-Fixing Deal

    A Virginia federal judge gave his final stamp of approval to a $61.6 million deal to end price-fixing claims against door manufacturers Jeld-Wen Inc. and Masonite Corp., and he also handed class counsel a $20.5 million cut of the revised settlement reached earlier this year.

  • June 04, 2021

    Bio-Rad Tries To Keep 10X From Talking Up Pandemic At Trial

    Bio-Rad has told a Massachusetts federal judge that any mention of the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic at next month's jury trial over its patented DNA technology would be "highly inflammatory," accusing 10X of trying to overstate the "alleged importance" of 10X's own scientific research.

  • June 04, 2021

    DLA Piper Adds IP Partners In Texas, DC

    DLA Piper has added two patent litigation partners with experience defending technology clients in its Austin, Texas, and Washington, D.C., offices.

  • June 04, 2021

    UK Litigation Roundup: Here's What You Missed In London

    The past week in London has seen more litigation involving Mozambique and Credit Suisse, Visa and Mastercard hit with new claims over swipe fees and two Woolen yarn companies facing off after a merger unraveled. Here, Law360 looks at those and other new claims in the U.K.

  • June 04, 2021

    Steptoe Snags Fried Frank Litigator In London

    Steptoe & Johnson has hired a former Fried Frank attorney with a background in fraud disputes and high-stakes commercial litigation to be a partner in its London office, bolstering the firm's roster of professionals experienced in managing antitrust, bribery and corruption issues. 

  • June 04, 2021

    Competition Watchdog Probes IHS Markit, CME Joint Venture

    Britain's competition watchdog said on Friday that it is investigating a proposed joint venture between subsidiaries of financial information provider IHS Markit Ltd. and CME Group, a derivatives exchange.

  • June 04, 2021

    Facebook Faces UK, EU Antitrust Probes Over Ad Data

    British and European antitrust enforcers are investigating whether Facebook has been using the data it collects from advertisers to keep its place at the top of the online advertising food chain, the watchdogs revealed Friday.

  • June 04, 2021

    CMA Opens Door To Investment Tech Firms' Merger

    Britain's antitrust watchdog agreed Friday to let an investment technology provider acquire part of its rival after initially blocking the tie-up because of concerns that the deal would significantly decrease competition for retail investment platforms.

  • June 03, 2021

    IHG Franchisee Hits Hotel Group With Antitrust Suit

    The Intercontinental Hotels Group forces its franchisees to buy overpriced and low-quality goods and services from its marketplace in order to score "tens of millions of ill-gotten dollars" in kickbacks from vendors, a Texas operator said in a putative antitrust class action Thursday.

  • June 03, 2021

    Diet Supplements Violated TM With Steroid Link, Jurors Hear

    A Texas-based dietary supplement company and its owner intentionally tried to make their product sound like illegal anabolic steroids and violated a trademark in doing so, an attorney for Hi-Tech Pharmaceuticals Inc. told a Georgia federal jury Thursday.

  • June 03, 2021

    Changes Coming To DOJ Antitrust IP Approach

    The U.S. Department of Justice's acting antitrust chief on Thursday teased changes ahead in a departure from his Trump administration predecessor's approach to intellectual property issues, which was defined by a belief in the absolute rights of patent holders and a presumption that licensing commitments don't trigger competition law.

  • June 03, 2021

    Fla., Ill. Win Concessions In $31M Keurig Brew Pod Settlement

    Florida and Illinois claimants in a $31 million settlement with Keurig over coffee pod prices will get equal treatment with other states that have passed laws allowing indirect purchasers to recover antitrust damages, according to a plan filed in New York federal court.

  • June 03, 2021

    Developers, Users Seek Class Status In Apple Antitrust Cases

    Developers and consumers that use Apple's App Store have asked a California federal court to certify separate classes that are pushing antitrust claims accusing the tech giant of monopolizing the market for software distributed on its devices.

  • June 03, 2021

    FTC Can't Seek Restitution From Shkreli Until Congress Acts

    A New York federal judge permitted the Federal Trade Commission to withdraw its bid for financial restitution against disgraced pharmaceutical executive Martin Shkreli and his company, Vyera Pharmaceuticals LLC, on Wednesday given the U.S. Supreme Court's recent ruling that the agency lacks the power to recoup money from lawbreakers.

  • June 03, 2021

    ECJ Urged To Largely Uphold €116M Disk Drive Cartel Fines

    An advocate general of Europe's top court came down largely on the side of the bloc's antitrust enforcer Thursday, backing its decision to whack eight optical disk drive suppliers with €116 million ($140 million) in fines for conspiring to rig bids for Dell and Hewlett-Packard's business.

Expert Analysis

  • What UK's New Merger Controls Mean For Private Equity

    Author Photo

    Expansive notification and approval requirements under the U.K.’s new merger control regime — the National Security and Investment Act — along with a lack of clarity about when they go into effect, pose unique challenges for private equity sponsors, as well as their investors and portfolio companies, say attorneys at Kirkland.

  • Judge's Rebuke Of Mass. AG Has Lessons For All Attorneys

    Author Photo

    A Massachusetts federal judge’s recent rebuke of the state Attorney General’s Office for refusing to respond to discovery requests in Alliance for Automotive Innovation v. Healey highlights six important considerations for attorneys who want to avoid the dreaded benchslap, say Alison Eggers and Dallin Wilson at Seyfarth.  

  • Font Considerations To Give Your Legal Briefs An Edge

    Author Photo

    Following the D.C. Circuit’s recent notice discouraging use of the font Garamond in legal briefs, Jason Steed at Kilpatrick looks at typeface requirements and preferences in appellate courts across the country, and how practitioners can score a few extra brief-writing points with typography.

  • Make Profitability Management Part Of Your Law Firm Culture

    Author Photo

    As the legal industry continues to change in the post-pandemic world, law firms should adapt to client demands by constantly measuring and managing the profitability of their services, says Joseph Altonji at LawVision.

  • 4 Trends In Discoverability Of Litigation Funding Documents

    Author Photo

    Recent rulings shed light on how courts and international arbitration tribunals decide if litigation funding materials are discoverable and reaffirm best practices that attorneys should follow when communicating with funders, say Justin Maleson at Longford Capital and Michele Slachetka and Christian Plummer at Jenner & Block.

  • High Court's AMG Ruling Could Hinder FDA Enforcement

    Author Photo

    The U.S. Supreme Court's decision in AMG Capital v. Federal Trade Commission, limiting the agency's ability to seek equitable monetary relief under the FTC Act, will likely also restrain the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's authority under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act, due to similarities between the laws, say Joshua Oyster and Jenna McCarthy at Ropes & Gray.

  • Expect Increasing Scrutiny Of Wage-Fixing, No-Poach Deals

    Author Photo

    Employers can expect more actions against wage-fixing or no-poach agreements as the U.S. Department of Justice's Antitrust Division cracks down on labor market collusion, so companies should consider tailoring these agreements on their scope, duration and definition of nonsolicitation, say attorneys at Duane Morris.

  • 7 Lessons For Young Lawyers Starting Their Careers

    Author Photo

    This year's law graduates and other young attorneys must recognize that the practice of law tests and rewards different skills and characteristics than law school, and that what makes a lawyer valuable changes over time, says Vernon Winters, retired partner at Sidley.

  • How Justices' AMG Ruling Affects Privacy And Cybersecurity

    Author Photo

    The U.S. Supreme Court's recent ruling in AMG Capital Management v. Federal Trade Commission removes the regulator's ability to seek monetary damages that discouraged privacy and cybersecurity breaches, and as a result, companies should reassess their exposure in these areas, say attorneys at Orrick.

  • High Court Blow To FTC Restitution Could Be Temporary

    Author Photo

    The U.S. Supreme Court's recent decision to roll back the Federal Trade Commission's power to seek monetary relief in AMG Capital will likely be met with legislative action to restore the agency's authority, or efforts to obtain restitution in other ways, say Bruce Hoffman and Nico Banks at Cleary.

  • Hedonic Regression Shows Promise For Modeling IP Damages

    Author Photo

    VLSI's recent $2.18 billion patent infringement damages award against Intel in a Texas federal court relied on hedonic regression analysis for modeling patent value, which looks compelling because it allows plaintiffs' experts to value infringed patents' critical benefits, say Richard Kamprath and Abigail Clark at McKool Smith.

  • Pharma Cos. Can Expect Harsh Antitrust Scrutiny From Biden

    Author Photo

    For pharmaceutical company mergers and acquisitions, increased antitrust scrutiny under the Biden administration, combined with international coordination of review and enforcement, will likely translate into longer, more in-depth and more expensive merger reviews, say attorneys at Faegre Drinker.

  • The Pandemic's Bright Spots For Lawyers Who Are Parents

    Author Photo

    The COVID-19 crisis has allowed lawyers to hone remote advocacy strategies and effectively represent clients with minimal travel — abilities that have benefited working parents and should be utilized long after the pandemic is over, says Chelsea Loughran at Wolf Greenfield.

  • How Tuna Antitrust Ruling Affects Job Bias Class Actions

    Author Photo

    Employment discrimination class actions that rely on statistical representations could look different following the recent Olean v. Bumble Bee antitrust ruling, due to the Ninth Circuit's scrutiny of models that obscure the extent of uninjured plaintiff membership, say attorneys at Orrick.

  • Opinion

    Supreme Court Is Right In Limiting Gov't Agency Authority

    Author Photo

    Although the U.S. Supreme Court's recent decisions in Facebook v. Duguid and AMG Capital Management v. Federal Trade Commission limit government agencies' power against robocallers and scam artists, they ultimately protect Americans from the greater threat of government overreach, says Eric Troutman at Squire Patton.

Want to publish in Law360?


Submit an idea
Can't find the article you're looking for? Click here to search the Competition archive.
Hello! I'm Law360's automated support bot.

How can I help you today?

For example, you can type:
  • I forgot my password
  • I took a free trial but didn't get a verification email
  • How do I sign up for a newsletter?
Ask a question!