Competition

  • June 11, 2020

    State-Supervised Health Insurers Exempt From EU Aid Rules

    European Union rules restricting state handouts do not apply to the companies running Slovakia's compulsory health insurance system, the bloc's top court said Thursday, as they have a "social objective."

  • June 11, 2020

    Deals Rumor Mill: Rackspace Technology, Airbnb, Hovis

    Cloud services provider Rackspace Technology could be valued at more than $10 billion in its planned initial public offering, Airbnb is still considering an IPO this year despite complications caused by the coronavirus pandemic, and bread-maker Hovis is up for grabs. Here, Law360 breaks down these and other deal rumors from the past week that you need to be aware of.

  • June 11, 2020

    SFO Ends Pursuit Of Traders Accused Of Rigging Euribor

    The Serious Fraud Office has dropped its five-year-old case against four European bankers accused of rigging a key interest rate benchmark at the height of the financial crisis, after courts in France and Germany refused to extradite the former traders.

  • June 10, 2020

    Watchdog Group Asks Gov't To Rethink Facebook Purchases

    A public interest group has urged several government entities — including the Federal Trade Commission, the Justice Department, the House Judiciary Committee, and the New York attorney general — to consider whether Facebook's previous acquisitions were anti-competitive, with an eye toward bringing an antitrust case against the company in the U.S.

  • June 10, 2020

    Cigna Jumps Into Pharmaceutical Generics Price-Fixing Fight

    Insurance giant Cigna has added its voice to the growing chorus calling for recompense from the pharmaceutical industry in a new suit accusing dozens of drugmakers of conspiring for years to inflate the prices of a slew of generic medications.

  • June 10, 2020

    Tyson Foods Cooperating With DOJ In Price-Fixing Probe

    Tyson Foods highlighted its cooperation with a U.S. Department of Justice consumer chicken price-fixing probe Wednesday, suggesting that its "swift and decisive actions" in response to an April grand jury subpoena could allow the corporation to come out of the ordeal relatively unscathed.

  • June 10, 2020

    AGs Pile On Generics Cos. With 3rd Price-Fixing Complaint

    State enforcers added more treatments to their price-fixing case against generic-drug makers with a third complaint Wednesday in Connecticut federal court accusing 26 companies and 10 individuals of "rampant" collusion on topically applied treatments.

  • June 10, 2020

    Grocers Urge 9th Circ. Not To Pause Tuna Price-Fixing Case

    A food wholesaler has pressed the Ninth Circuit to reject a move by tuna producers to pause a price-fixing case while they appeal an order certifying buyers' classes, saying the producers can't show they will be harmed if the case proceeds.

  • June 10, 2020

    Competitors Question Deliveroo's Need For Amazon Deal

    The U.K.'s competition enforcer on Wednesday extended the deadline for its review of Amazon's planned minority investment in Deliveroo, after competitors questioned the delivery services' contention that it needs the money to survive the COVID-19 pandemic.

  • June 10, 2020

    9th Circ. Says Snubbed CRT Buyers Can't Challenge Deals Yet

    Cathode ray tube buyers who were cut out of more than $500 million in price-fixing settlements must wait until those deals are finalized before they can take their challenge to the Ninth Circuit, the appellate court has ruled.

  • June 10, 2020

    Cypriot Cos. Can Defer VAT Payments Until Nov., EU Says

    Companies in Cyprus with value-added tax payments due in April, May and June can defer those payments until November, the European Union announced Wednesday in approving a plan to ease liquidity constraints for businesses affected by the novel coronavirus pandemic.

  • June 10, 2020

    Senator Rips Antitrust Chief's Responses On Carmaker Probe

    A Democratic senator is threatening to block an antitrust enforcement bill until the U.S. Justice Department offers more details about the agency's investigation into whether four big carmakers engaged in "collusive conduct" by entering an emissions standards deal with California regulators.

  • June 09, 2020

    Total Subsidiary Escapes Calif. City's Gas Price Antitrust Suit

    Long Beach, California, can't pursue antitrust claims against a Total SA unit because the oil and gas company's alleged manipulation of the U.S. natural gas market didn't hinge upon it leveraging a position of power to the detriment of other traders, a Manhattan federal court has ruled.

  • June 09, 2020

    Insulin Wholesalers Want Consumers To Get Out Of Their Way

    A clash between drug wholesalers and insulin users suing manufacturers Eli Lilly, Novo Nordisk and Sanofi-Aventis in New Jersey federal court over alleged fraudulent pricing escalated Monday after two wholesale companies fired off against the consumers' request to pause discovery in the companies' part of the class action.

  • June 09, 2020

    FTC, Impax Spar At 5th Circ. Over Opana ER Deal

    Impax Laboratories defended its settlement agreement with Endo Pharmaceuticals over opioid pain medication Opana ER during oral argument at the Fifth Circuit on Tuesday, as the Federal Trade Commission insisted the deal delayed generic versions of the drug and broke the law.

  • June 09, 2020

    PetIQ Merger Fight Faces Skeptical Judge At 9th Circ.

    A judge sitting on a Ninth Circuit panel appeared skeptical Tuesday of efforts by pet medicine wholesalers to revive their antitrust suit challenging PetIQ Inc.'s purchase of a veterinary clinic chain, saying he still doesn't "have any idea" what the proposed markets and participants are even after reading their complaint.

  • June 09, 2020

    UK Clears Elanco's $135M Divestiture For Bayer Deal

    The U.K.'s antitrust regulator on Tuesday greenlighted the sale of Elanco Animal Health Inc.'s global rights for dog ear infection treatment Osurnia to Dechra Pharmaceuticals PLC for $135 million, just one day after the European Commission cleared Elanco's planned $7.6 billion purchase of Bayer AG's animal health division.

  • June 09, 2020

    Servier Urges Justices To Play By EU Pay-For-Delay Ruling

    Drugmaker Servier urged the U.K.'s highest court Tuesday to rule that English litigation alleging it blocked generic competition to its blood pressure medication cannot veer from a European court's finding that it didn't hold potentially anti-competitive dominance over the market.

  • June 09, 2020

    FTC Urges Judge To Halt Merger Of 'Coal Behemoth'

    The Federal Trade Commission has urged a Missouri federal court to temporarily block the joint venture of two coal-mining companies, Peabody Energy Corp. and Arch Coal Inc., claiming the combined operations will result in the control of coal in the Southern Powder River Basin.

  • June 09, 2020

    Trading Software Co. Hit With Antitrust Suit

    A Manhattan-based investment management technology firm sued a competing software company in New York federal court Tuesday, alleging it blocked access to its software, violated its contract with the company and broke antitrust laws.

  • June 09, 2020

    RentPath Cleared For $588M Ch. 11 Sale And Reorg Plan

    Bankrupt online rental property marketing company RentPath Holdings Inc. received Delaware bankruptcy court permission Tuesday for a $588 million sale of its assets and for its proposed Chapter 11 plan that will make distributions to creditors from the proceeds of the sale.

  • June 09, 2020

    Volvo Says Truck Cartel Didn't Hit Suppliers' Wallet

    Volvo has hit back at a lawsuit brought by suppliers of construction materials, which are seeking damages over the automaker's role in a massive truck price-fixing scandal, telling a London court that they passed on any additional costs to their customers.

  • June 08, 2020

    Bull Semen Co. Boosts Win Against Rival To $11M In IP Row

    A Wisconsin federal judge awarded a Texas bull semen company nearly $11 million on Monday, boosting an $8.5 million verdict handed down last year after a trial in which the jury found a rival business had infringed the Texas company's patents for breeding milk cows.

  • June 08, 2020

    Judge Says Cert. Unlikely For Parent ADHD Med Buyers

    Parents who say they overpaid for their children's ADHD medications can't pause their antitrust suit against Actavis and Shire while they appeal the court's decision to deny them class certification, a Massachusetts federal judge ruled Monday.

  • June 08, 2020

    Reynolds & Reynolds Wins Docs Bid In Auto Dealer Data MDL

    Authenticom Inc. must turn over most of the third-party communications that CDK Global LLC and Reynolds & Reynolds Co. requested from the rival software company in multidistrict litigation over their alleged manipulation of the market for crucial auto dealer data, an Illinois federal judge said.

Expert Analysis

  • Antitrust Pitfalls For Suppliers In A Constrained Market

    Author Photo

    Suppliers compelled to make hard decisions concerning product allocation during the pandemic must take precautions because these constrained supply conditions could create market power and restrict a supplier's lawful alternatives, say attorneys at Akerman.

  • What All Attorneys Can Learn From Female Rainmakers

    Author Photo

    Soon lawyers may find an unrecognizable competitive landscape in which most firms will be vulnerable — if they don't rapidly start upgrading their client development tactics to ones like those used by female rainmakers, says marketing consultant Craig Levinson, who recently interviewed Jennifer Trock, Desiree Moore and Debra Fischer about their secrets to success.

  • A Tale Of Two Antitrust Leniency Programs: Hong Kong Vs. US

    Author Photo

    The Hong Kong Competition Commission recently announced sweeping changes that make its antitrust leniency program in some ways more progressive than the U.S. program, offering greater protection to both companies and individuals that obtain leniency, say attorneys at Reed Smith.

  • High Court Booking.com Case Highlights Stale TM Test

    Author Photo

    In Monday's oral arguments for the U.S. Supreme Court Booking.com case, the justices' struggle over whether adding ".com" to a generic term renders the term a protectable trademark suggests that the tests for determining genericism were not designed to work flawlessly in the internet context, say attorneys at Arnold & Porter.

  • 4 Takeaways From 3rd Circ. Classwide Antitrust Injury Ruling

    Author Photo

    The Third Circuit's recent holding in the Lamictal class action — that every plaintiff must be able to show antitrust injury through evidence common to the class — has several important implications for parties litigating the predominance requirement, say attorneys at V&E.

  • The 1st COVID-19 Prosecutions Under Defense Production Act

    Author Photo

    Based on two complaints recently filed by prosecutors in the Eastern District of New York, it is not clear how the government believes the Defense Production Act's use of the phrase "prevailing market prices" should be understood, says Dylan Smith at Freeborn & Peters.

  • Promoting Lawyer Well-Being Is More Essential Than Ever

    Author Photo

    As the COVID-19 pandemic profoundly tests the overall well-being of lawyers, firms with behavioral health programs can leverage or adapt many existing resources to respond to the crisis, while firms without formal programs can find little ways to make a big difference, says Krista Larson, director of employee well-being at Morgan Lewis.

  • Cos. Must Prep For Potential Federal Price-Gouging Regs

    Author Photo

    As Congress considers several bills to address gaps in state price-gouging laws, businesses not currently subject to regulation should anticipate liability and take measures to deter, detect, avoid and respond to enforcement, say attorneys at ​​​​​​​Buchanan Ingersoll.

  • Remote Depositions Bring Ethics Considerations For Lawyers

    Author Photo

    Utilizing virtual litigation technologies and participating in remote depositions require attorneys to beware of inadvertently violating their ethical obligations, including the principal duty to provide competent representation, say attorneys at Troutman Sanders.

  • Sellers, Anticipate Novel Calif. Price-Gouging Class Actions

    Author Photo

    Because the California price-gouging statute could create massive liability amid the pandemic and is amenable to class treatment, platforms and retailers throughout the supply chain should take steps now, including documentation and proactive communication, to minimize their risk, say Chris Wheeler and David Hofmayer at Farella Braun.

  • Early Pandemic-Related Shifts We're Seeing In Legal Finance

    Author Photo

    As law firms chart their paths forward during these unsettled times, litigation funders are already observing changes in the types of products firms are seeking, such as an increase in one-off case funding requests, says Eric Blinderman at Therium.

  • Opinion

    The Death Of The LSAT

    Author Photo

    Over the last year, the LSAT has been anything but unflappable — it has not been the objective, standardized law school entrance exam it's supposed to be, say soon-to-be law student Elliot Fuchs and attorney Saul Bienenfeld.

  • Examining Startup Investors' Thoughts On Big Tech's Power

    Author Photo

    At a recent workshop, the U.S. Department of Justice hoped to learn from the venture capital community about disruptive innovation and whether large tech companies' dominance is too great, and the tensions between consumer welfare, pricing, large business interests and competition were apparent throughout, says Jennifer Oliver at MoginRubin.

  • Questions Raised By The Proposed Vertical Merger Guidelines

    Author Photo

    Public comments on the federal antitrust agencies' draft vertical merger guidelines show that practitioners want more concrete guidance and that there is little consensus over how much weight to give theories of harm, empirical evidence or potential consumer benefits, say economists at Cornerstone Research.

  • Pandemic May Prompt Legislative Action On Court Deadlines

    Author Photo

    The COVID-19 crisis shines light on the fact that the federal government and most states do not have the power to toll statutes of limitations, and could lead to a full-scale reconsideration of the Federal Judiciary Emergency Powers Tolling Act or other legislative efforts, say Reed Brodsky and Michael Nadler at Gibson Dunn.

Can't find the article you're looking for? Click here to search the Competition archive.
Hello! I'm Law360's automated support bot.

How can I help you today?

For example, you can type:
  • I forgot my password
  • I took a free trial but didn't get a verification email
  • How do I sign up for a newsletter?
Beta
Ask a question!