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Construction

  • August 20, 2018

    Construction Co. Placed Fake Bids With DOE, Jury Told

    Prosecutors told a California federal jury Monday that a family-owned construction company participated in a bid-rigging conspiracy by placing an artificially high bid on a U.S. Department of Energy contract for a University of California, Berkeley laboratory, but the defendants’ attorneys accused the government of trying to entrap their clients with an undercover informant.

  • August 20, 2018

    Contractor Made New Company To Duck Pension, Union Says

    A New England masonry union on Monday sued a Massachusetts contractor who allegedly founded a company in an attempt to thwart overdue retirement contributions and continue stonework on old buildings north of Boston, including restoration at the Salem Witch Museum.

  • August 20, 2018

    Transit Group Unlikely To Dodge Leaning Tower Of SF Suit

    A San Francisco judge said Monday he’d likely find that the Transbay Joint Powers Authority can’t escape Millennium Tower residents’ litigation over the structure's tilting and sinking, pointing to a contract in which the public transit agency took on the tower developer's liability in exchange for permission to construct a nearby terminal.

  • August 20, 2018

    7th Circ. Says Caterpillar Trust Plan Wasn't Age-Biased

    The Seventh Circuit on Monday upheld a finding that the liquidation of Caterpillar Inc.'s unemployment benefit plan for an Illinois plant was not a case of age discrimination, saying the heavy equipment manufacturer had legitimate business reasons for structuring the program the way it did.

  • August 20, 2018

    Contractors Off The Hook For Illinois Roof Worker's Fall

    An Illinois state appeals court on Friday sided with a general contractor and a subcontractor for a hospital construction project in a lawsuit seeking to hold them responsible for injuries caused by a roof builder’s fall, affirming a determination that the companies cannot be held liable for the incident.

  • August 20, 2018

    Navillus Strikes Deal With Unions That Bankrupted It

    New York City construction heavyweight Navillus Tile Inc. has reached a deal with the unions that forced it into bankruptcy last year with a devastating $76 million judgment, paving the way for an exit from Chapter 11 as early as October, the concrete contractor says.

  • August 20, 2018

    NLRB Tells Masonry Co. To Quit Stalling On Bargaining

    The National Labor Relations Board on Friday ordered Florida's Advanced Masonry Associates LLC to begin negotiating a collective bargaining agreement with workers represented by a chapter of the International Union of Bricklayers and Allied Craftworkers, saying issues the company had with the validity of the bargaining unit and its status as a labor organization were resolved during a prior proceeding.

  • August 20, 2018

    More China Tariffs Loom As USTR Opens Marathon Hearings

    The Office of the U.S. Trade Representative on Monday began a week’s worth of daylong public hearings on its proposal to hit $200 billion of Chinese goods with new duties, the most aggressive salvo yet in its ongoing battle with Beijing over intellectual property and technology acquisition policies.

  • August 20, 2018

    Turkey Becomes 9th WTO Member To Fight US Metal Tariffs

    Turkey has filed a World Trade Organization challenge to the Trump administration's steel and aluminum tariffs, becoming the ninth government to question the national security justification for the levies, according to a WTO document circulated Monday.

  • August 17, 2018

    Bowles Rice, Insurer Resolve $41M Fight On Eve Of Trial

    Bowles Rice has resolved a $41 million fight with a title insurer stemming from a troubled coal plant build and averted a trial that was set to start Monday, according to a lawyer involved in the case, heading off what at least one expert said was a sizable threat to the firm in the face of its limited malpractice coverage.

  • August 17, 2018

    2nd Circ. Finds No Bias In Erie Project Contractor Termination

    The Second Circuit on Friday upheld the dismissal of a lawsuit over the termination of a female contractor’s involvement in a harbor construction project in Buffalo, saying she failed to prove the decision to pull the contract was part of a gender-based conspiracy orchestrated by Empire State Development Corp. and others associated with the project, including a law firm.

  • August 17, 2018

    Half-Built Fla. Resort's $39M Sale Gets Court Approval

    A Florida bankruptcy judge signed off Friday on a $39.1 million sale of a stalled Fort Lauderdale resort partially built with $30 million from the EB-5 immigrant investor visa program.

  • August 17, 2018

    Demolition Co. Founder Sues Over Termination Dispute

    The co-owner of a demolition and environmental remediation firm launched an Illinois federal court suit against the company and its majority shareholders Thursday that alleges they schemed to push her out of the business and devalue her stake for their benefit.

  • August 17, 2018

    UK Litigation Roundup: Here's What You Missed In London

    The last week has seen Gatwick Airport sue an insolvent construction firm and two insurers for professional negligence, Deutsche Bank lodge a claim against India's Canara Bank and a Markel unit file a contract dispute against German animal insurance specialist Hippo.

  • August 17, 2018

    Deals Rumor Mill: Mafengwo, Marfrig, LafargeHolcim

    Mafengwo wants to raise as much as $300 million in new funding, Marfrig inked a deal to sell Keystone Foods to Tyson Foods Inc. for $2.5 billion and LafargeHolcim Ltd. has earned the interest of Asian powerhouses for its Indonesian unit.

  • August 17, 2018

    Turkey Tariff Hike Adds Fuel To Battle Over Cold War-Era Law

    President Donald Trump’s decision to double his tariff on Turkish steel underscores the need to strike down the Cold War-era national security law that gave rise to the duties in the first place, importers challenging the statute told the U.S. Court of International Trade.

  • August 17, 2018

    Insurance Co. Must Cover Contractor In Sports Complex Row

    A Texas federal judge has ordered Mt. Hawley Insurance Co. to cover a contractor in a lawsuit alleging a breach of contract in the construction of a sports complex, ruling that the policy's exclusions don't free the insurer because a subcontractor may be responsible for the alleged damage.

  • August 17, 2018

    Wall Installer Can't Restart Claims Against Related Cos.

    U.S. District Judge Jed S. Rakoff has blocked an exterior wall installer’s bid to reinstate fraud and unjust enrichment claims against The Related Companies LP over the real estate firm’s collection of funds from a Chicago project, saying the allegations are not sufficiently supported.

  • August 16, 2018

    Recom AG Can't Yet Escape $1.9M Arbitration Award Dispute

    A New Jersey federal judge said Thursday that Recom AG can’t hide behind its U.S. branch as it seeks to avoid paying a $1.9 million arbitration award to a construction company, rejecting the German solar panel supplier’s bid to escape the dispute.

  • August 16, 2018

    Will Law Schools Start Counting ‘Generation ADA’?

    No one is tracking law students with disabilities to see where the education system may be failing them, but some advocates are working to change this dynamic and build a better pipeline.

Expert Analysis

  • 'High Availability' — A Key Term In Law Firm IT Strategy

    Jeff Norris

    While most law firm executives and partners may instinctively want to tune out terms like "high availability" and "disaster recovery" — concepts that IT managers usually worry about — there are five reasons you should lean in and wrestle with the vocabulary, say Jeff Norris of Managed Technology Services LLC and Greg Inge of information security consulting firm CQR.

  • The 'Post-Fact' Jury In The 'Fake News' Era

    Ross Laguzza

    The "fake news" phenomenon is ever more prominent in the political arena — but not in the jury box. At a trial, jurors don’t have to rely on the media or any other source to tell them the facts and issues, since they have a front-row seat to the action, says Ross Laguzza, a consultant at R&D Strategic Solutions LLC.

  • Series

    Judging A Book: Lipez Reviews 'Last Great Colonial Lawyer'

    Judge Kermit Lipez

    In his new book, "The Last Great Colonial Lawyer: The Life and Legacy of Jeremiah Gridley," Charles McKirdy argues that Gridley — someone I had never heard of — was the last great colonial lawyer, and that his cases illuminate his times. The author largely substantiates both claims, says First Circuit Judge Kermit Lipez.

  • Interview Essentials For Attorneys On The Move

    Eileen Decker

    Across the country this fall, recent law school graduates, law firm associates and experienced professionals will interview for positions in private practice and government service. Sharing tips on how to stand out in this high-pressure, hypercompetitive process are Eileen Decker, former U.S. attorney for the Central District of California, and Keith Jacoby, co-chairman of Littler Mendelson PC’s class action practice group.

  • Roundup

    Clerking For Ginsburg

    Clerking For Ginsburg

    Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg joined the U.S. Supreme Court 25 years ago and is not planning to retire anytime soon — she has hired clerks through 2020. What's it like to assist Justice Ginsburg? In this series, former clerks reflect on the experience.

  • Series

    Clerking For Ginsburg: 3 Surprises

    David Post

    It had never occurred to me that judges don’t always love the way their appellate cousins review their work and tell them — in public — all the things they got wrong. I was frequently struck by Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s acute awareness of the delicacy of this relationship, says attorney David Post.

  • Series

    Clerking For Ginsburg: A Superhero Supreme

    Burden Walker

    As a clerk for Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, my job was to mirror my boss’ views and values in everything I did. Years later, I find that I am still striving to live up to the values Justice Ginsburg instilled in me, as both a lawyer and a spouse, says Burden Walker, an assistant U.S. attorney for the District of Maryland.

  • Series

    Clerking For Ginsburg: 4 RBG Lessons On Having It All

    Rachel Wainer Apter

    Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg is everything she is cracked up to be​ — f​eminist icon​, brilliant jurist​, fierce dissenter. She is also an incredible boss, mentor and friend.​ ​Her advice has shaped how I have tried to balance building a career and ​raising children, says Rachel Wainer Apter, counsel to the New Jersey attorney general.

  • Series

    Clerking For Ginsburg: How To Play The Long Game

    Arun Subramanian

    One of us was a clerk when Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg read her Ledbetter dissent from the bench, inviting Congress to act, and the other clerked a few years later, when RBG's prominently displayed copy of the Lilly Ledbetter Fair Pay Act served as a daily reminder that dissents are not just for show, say Arun Subramanian and Mark Musico of Susman Godfrey LLP.

  • Series

    Clerking For Ginsburg: In Pursuit Of Precision

    Trevor Morrison

    As clerks for Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, we learned early on that, when preparing a memorandum or draft opinion, it was essential to present any opposing argument in its strongest possible light. There is a lesson here for today's public debates, says Trevor Morrison, dean of NYU Law School.