Construction

  • June 12, 2024

    Tribes Say Court Must Examine Spill Risks In Gold Mine Row

    Half a dozen tribes that oppose a large open-pit gold mine along the Kuskokwim River in southwest Alaska have urged a federal judge to vacate a U.S. Army Corps of Engineers authorization for the project, saying the government has wrongly interpreted environmental concerns.

  • June 12, 2024

    Landscaper's H-2B App Doomed By Missing Permanent Staff

    A Utah landscaper's efforts to hire 15 construction workers through the H-2B seasonal worker visa program was doomed by evidence that the company hadn't maintained a permanent workforce, according to a recent U.S. Department of Labor decision.

  • June 12, 2024

    Worker Hits Lumber Co. With 401(k) Fee, Investment Suit

    A lumber company violated federal benefits law by choosing expensive, poor-performing funds for its employee retirement plan and saddling participants with lofty fees, according to a new lawsuit filed in Pennsylvania federal court.

  • June 12, 2024

    Construction Co. Owes $353K For H-2A Violations, DOL Says

    A Nebraska construction company operating in California must pay nearly $353,000 in back wages and fines for denying 43 workers their full wages and rights under the H-2A temporary worker program, the U.S. Department of Labor announced Wednesday.

  • June 11, 2024

    Berkshire Unit Wants $20M Antitrust Loss Tossed Or New Trial

    A Berkshire Hathaway-owned construction supplier asked a Colorado federal judge Monday to reverse its $20 million jury trial loss to a smaller rival in the insulation material business, arguing that the damages are untethered to the alleged conduct, especially under a Tenth Circuit decision reviving the antitrust lawsuit.

  • June 11, 2024

    Trade Court Affirms Evasion Finding Against Pipe Co.

    A Cambodian pipe company should have been ready for U.S. investigators' scrutiny based on its owner's history of duty evasion, a U.S. Court of International Trade judge determined this week, rejecting its due process claims.

  • June 11, 2024

    2025 Trial Set For Ex-Conn. Official Charged In Kickback Scheme

    A Feb. 6 jury selection date has been set in a federal corruption case accusing a former Connecticut state budget official, lawmaker and beleaguered attorney of extortion and bribery in connection with millions in school finance projects.

  • June 11, 2024

    Insurer Given Early Exit From Contractor's Cost Overrun Suit

    An insurance company was axed Monday from a general contractor's $8.5 million lawsuit against a developer seeking payment for its work building an apartment complex, with a North Carolina state court judge ruling it was too soon to rope in the insurer.

  • June 11, 2024

    Home Depot Again Notches Win In OT Suit

    A California federal court ruled that although a group of workers accusing Home Depot of unpaid overtime set forth enough new evidence to reconsider a win the home improvement chain snagged, the workers didn't sustain their arguments that the company purposely tried to dodge overtime laws.

  • June 11, 2024

    Travelers Says No Coverage For Investment Bank's Bond Row

    A Travelers unit said it doesn't owe directors and officers coverage to an investment bank accused of misleading bondholders into investing in a sports complex development project, telling an Illinois federal court the policy bars coverage for claims arising from the bank's performance of services for a client.

  • June 11, 2024

    Ga. Justices Say 1-Year Lawsuit Window Stands In Death Case

    The Supreme Court of Georgia won't hold liable a home inspector sued by the family of a man who was killed when his home's retaining wall collapsed, ruling Tuesday that the inspector's one-year statute of limitations doesn't violate a state ban on hold harmless provisions in construction contracts.

  • June 11, 2024

    Skechers Supplier Banned For Alleged Forced Labor Ties

    Federal authorities announced on Tuesday three new additions — including a shoemaker linked to the sneaker brand Skechers — to their blacklist of companies purportedly linked to systematic oppression of Uyghurs and other minority groups in China.

  • June 11, 2024

    Ex-Union Leader Seeks Sentencing Delay Ahead Of Retrial

    Former International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers Local 98 business manager John Dougherty has asked a Pennsylvania federal judge to postpone his sentencing for his bribery and embezzlement convictions, pointing to the possibility of the government retrying him on extortion charges following an April mistrial in that case.

  • June 11, 2024

    Feds Want 10 Years For Ex-Chicago Alderman Burke

    Federal prosecutors asked an Illinois federal judge Monday to send former Chicago Alderman Ed Burke to prison for 10 years for "brazenly and boldly" using his official position to steer tax business to his law firm, while Burke requested a sentence of probation, bolstered by letters of support from prominent attorneys and retired judges.

  • June 10, 2024

    Debevoise Aims To Sink Cognizant Bribery Trial Subpoena

    Debevoise & Plimpton LLP urged a New Jersey federal judge Monday to quash defendants' trial subpoena that would require a Debevoise partner to testify in an upcoming September criminal bribery trial against ex-Cognizant Technology Solutions's chief legal officer and another former executive, arguing that the testimony is subject to attorney-client privilege.

  • June 10, 2024

    Contractor Can Replead Claims In $115M City Streetcar Suit

    A contractor suing the city of Charlotte for $115 million over alleged cost overruns and delays on a streetcar line construction project will have another shot at pleading its contract claims after a North Carolina Business Court judge cleared the path to file an amended complaint.

  • June 10, 2024

    Pa. Bridge Collapse Victim Can Only Get $5K, Court Told  

    Pittsburgh Regional Transit wants to trim claims brought by a passenger aboard a bus that was on the Fern Hollow Bridge when it collapsed in 2022, telling a Pennsylvania court that as a self-insured state agency, the most it would owe her is $5,000 for medical expenses.

  • June 07, 2024

    Real Estate Authority: EPA's Brownfield Funding Surge

    Catch up on this week's key developments by state from Law360 Real Estate Authority — including a new data series on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's brownfield grant program.

  • June 07, 2024

    LIHTC Developer Asks 11th Circ. To Undo Investor Takeover

    A developer told the Eleventh Circuit on Friday it is a victim of a scheme by investors using a lower court ruling to complete a takeover of two Tampa, Florida, senior housing complexes developed with federal low-income housing tax credits.

  • June 07, 2024

    Contractor Claims No Bad Intentions In Talking To Juror

    A general contractor has doubled down on his bid to throw out a contempt conviction for talking to a juror before his suit was officially settled, telling a North Carolina appeals court he genuinely believed the case was over and didn't intend to disrupt the court or violate any order.

  • June 07, 2024

    DOE Reveals National Definition Of Zero-Emissions Building

    The U.S. Department of Energy unveiled a federal definition for determining whether a residential or commercial building qualifies as a zero-emissions building as part of an ongoing effort to slash greenhouse gas emissions across the traditionally heavily emitting sector.

  • June 07, 2024

    Texas Top Court Denies Roofer's Challenge To Adjuster Laws

    The Supreme Court of Texas tossed on Friday a roofing company's challenge to the state's public adjuster licensing laws, saying that requiring a license or preventing certain conduct didn't violate the roofer's free speech rights.

  • June 07, 2024

    Calif. Developer Seeks $5M Excess Coverage For Defect Suits

    A California developer is seeking coverage under a $5 million excess policy for an underlying settlement stemming from construction defect claims, telling a federal court that its excess insurer wrongfully refused to cooperate in the dispute resolution and that the policy expressly provided coverage.

  • June 07, 2024

    Fla. Builder's Former In-House Atty Beats DQ Bid In Firing Suit

    A Florida federal judge has rejected a development company's bid to disqualify the Boatman Ricci law firm from representing the company's former in-house counsel in his wrongful termination lawsuit.

  • June 06, 2024

    Calif. Justices OK UC Berkeley People's Park Housing Plan

    The University of California, Berkeley, can move ahead with its plans to build a housing project in the historic People's Park, the California Supreme Court ruled Thursday, saying a new state law wipes out opponents' claims that the university's environmental impact study failed to look at potential student noise pollution.

Expert Analysis

  • Series

    Playing Chess Makes Me A Better Lawyer

    Author Photo

    There are many ways that chess skills translate directly into lawyer skills, but for me, the bigger career lessons go beyond the direct parallels — playing chess has shown me the value of seeing gradual improvement in and focusing deep concentration on a nonwork endeavor, says attorney Steven Fink.

  • State Procurement Could Be Key For Calif. Offshore Wind

    Author Photo

    A recent ruling from the California Public Utilities Commission highlights how the state's centralized electricity procurement mechanism could play a critical role in the development of long lead-time resources — in particular, offshore wind — by providing market assurance to developers and reducing utilities' procurement risks, say attorneys at Wilson Sonsini.

  • Litigation Inspiration: Attys Can Be Heroic Like Olympians

    Author Photo

    Although litigation won’t earn anyone an Olympic medal in Paris this summer, it can be worthy of the same lasting honor if attorneys exercise focused restraint — seeking both their clients’ interests and those of the court — instead of merely pursuing every advantage short of sanctionable conduct, says Bennett Rawicki at Hilgers Graben.

  • Lean Into The 'Great Restoration' To Retain Legal Talent

    Author Photo

    As the “great resignation,” in which employees voluntarily left their jobs in droves, has largely dissipated, legal employers should now work toward the idea of a “great restoration,” adopting strategies to effectively hire, onboard and retain top legal talent, says Molly McGrath at Hiring & Empowering Solutions.

  • Series

    Fishing Makes Me A Better Lawyer

    Author Photo

    Atop the list of ways fishing makes me a better lawyer is the relief it offers from the chronic stress of a demanding caseload, but it has also improved my listening skills and patience, and has served as an exceptional setting for building earnest relationships, says Steven DeGeorge​​​​​​​ at Robinson Bradshaw.

  • A Healthier Legal Industry Starts With Emotional Intelligence

    Author Photo

    The legal profession has long been plagued by high rates of mental health issues, in part due to attorneys’ early training and broader societal stereotypes — but developing one’s emotional intelligence is one way to foster positive change, collectively and individually, says attorney Esperanza Franco.

  • To Make Your Legal Writing Clear, Emulate A Master Chef

    Author Photo

    To deliver clear and effective written advocacy, lawyers should follow the model of a fine dining chef — seasoning a foundation of pure facts with punchy descriptors, spicing it up with analogies, refining the recipe and trimming the fat — thus catering to a sophisticated audience of decision-makers, says Reuben Guttman at Guttman Buschner.

  • Circuit Judge Writes An Opinion, AI Helps: What Now?

    Author Photo

    Last week's Eleventh Circuit opinion in Snell v. United Specialty Insurance, notable for a concurrence outlining the use of artificial intelligence to evaluate a term's common meaning, is hopefully the first step toward developing a coherent basis for the judiciary's generative AI use, says David Zaslowsky at Baker McKenzie.

  • Opinion

    US Solar Import Probe's Focus On China Is Misguided

    Author Photo

    The U.S. Department of Commerce's recent anti-dumping and countervailing duty investigation focuses on the apparent Chinese ownership of solar device importers in four Southeast Asian countries — a point that is irrelevant under the controlling statute, says John Anwesen at Lighthill.

  • 3 Recent Decisions To Note As Climate Litigation Heats Up

    Author Photo

    Three recent rulings on climate-related issues — from a New York federal court, a New York state court and an international tribunal, respectively — demonstrate both regulators' concern about climate change and the complexity of conflicting regulations in different jurisdictions, say J. Michael Showalter and Robert Middleton at ArentFox Schiff.

  • Perspectives

    Trauma-Informed Legal Approaches For Pro Bono Attorneys

    Author Photo

    As National Trauma Awareness Month ends, pro bono attorneys should nevertheless continue to acknowledge the mental and physical effects of trauma, allowing them to better represent clients, and protect themselves from compassion fatigue and burnout, say Katherine Cronin at Stinson and Katharine Manning at Blackbird.

  • Series

    Playing Music Makes Me A Better Lawyer

    Author Photo

    My deep and passionate involvement in playing, writing and producing music equipped me with skills — like creativity, improvisation and problem-solving — that contribute to the success of my legal career, says attorney Kenneth Greene.

  • How Attys Can Avoid Pitfalls When Withdrawing From A Case

    Author Photo

    The Trump campaign's recent scuffle over its bid to replace its counsel in a pregnancy retaliation suit offers a chance to remind attorneys that many troubles inherent in withdrawing from a case can be mitigated or entirely avoided by communicating with clients openly and frequently, says Christopher Konneker at Orsinger Nelson.

  • Using A Children's Book Approach In Firm Marketing Content

    Author Photo

    From “The Giving Tree” to “Where the Wild Things Are,” most children’s books are easy to remember because they use simple words and numbers to tell stories with a human impact — a formula law firms should emulate in their marketing content to stay front of mind for potential clients, says Seema Desai Maglio at The Found Word.

  • Opinion

    NEPA Final Rule Unlikely To Speed Clean Energy Projects

    Author Photo

    A recent final rule from the White House Council on Environmental Quality purports to streamline federal environmental reviews to accelerate the construction of renewable energy infrastructure — but it also expands consideration of climate change and environmental justice, creating vast new opportunities for litigation and delay, says Thomas Prevas at Saul Ewing.

Want to publish in Law360?


Submit an idea

Have a news tip?


Contact us here
Hello! I'm Law360's automated support bot.

How can I help you today?

For example, you can type:
  • I forgot my password
  • I took a free trial but didn't get a verification email
  • How do I sign up for a newsletter?
Ask a question!