Corporate

  • December 7, 2009

    Korea Goes To WTO Over US' Use Of Zeroing

    Korea has become the latest nation to take issue with the United States' use of a debated methodology for calculating dumping margins, saying in a World Trade Organization consultations request that the practice has led to unfair anti-dumping duty orders.

  • December 4, 2009

    Former Broadcom GC Dodges Charges In Options Case

    Amid allegations of misconduct by a federal prosecutor, former Broadcom Corp. general counsel David Dull has secured a nonprosecution agreement in the ongoing stock options backdating case against former top executives of the semiconductor company, according to court documents.

  • December 4, 2009

    Bayer Hit For $2M In 1st Bellwether Rice Trial

    A federal jury on Friday found Bayer AG liable for contaminating the U.S. rice supply with two strains of genetically modified rice, awarding two farmers compensatory damages of about $2 million but declining to issue punitive damages.

  • December 4, 2009

    EU Council Approves Patent Reform Package

    The European Council unanimously adopted a legislative package Friday designed to create a single European Union patent and patent court, marking a breakthrough in the long-running efforts to reform the patent system for the 27-member bloc.

  • December 4, 2009

    Kerry Bill Lays Ground For Global Green Investments

    Sen. John Kerry, D-Mass., has unveiled legislation that would increase funding to help developing countries deploy clean technologies, reduce deforestation and cope with climate change in hopes of providing the basis for an international investment deal at crucial United Nations talks next week.

  • December 3, 2009

    Push For Section 5 Revival Puts Businesses On Alert

    The Federal Trade Commission's growing signals that it is poised to breathe new life into Section 5 of the Federal Trade Commission Act have sparked questions about just how far the agency could push its authority under the long-dormant statute to target conduct outside the bounds of U.S. antitrust laws.

  • December 3, 2009

    Kohl Pitches Stricter Pay-For-Delay Drug Rules

    Sen. Herb Kohl, D-Wis., on Thursday proposed an amendment to the U.S. Senate health care legislation that would place limits on the pay-for-delay deals that brand-name drug manufacturers strike with generics makers in order to slow the market entry of generic competition to blockbuster drugs.

  • December 3, 2009

    Senate OKs Women's Care Amendment In Health Bill

    In its first amendment to the health care overhaul, the U.S. Senate has voted for a provision sponsored by Sen. Barbara Mikulski, D-Md., that would force insurance companies to pay for the entire cost of preventive care such as mammograms for women.

  • December 3, 2009

    Wal-Mart To Pay $40M To End Mass. Wage Action

    Wal-Mart Stores Inc. has resolved a long-running wage-and-hour class action by agreeing to pay $40 million to 87,500 workers at its Massachusetts stores who accused the discount retailer of refusing them breaks and requiring them to work off the clock.

  • December 3, 2009

    $203M Kickback Verdict For SC Johnson Upheld

    A Wisconsin appeals court has affirmed a $203.8 million judgment in favor of S.C. Johnson & Son Inc. stemming from an alleged kickback scheme between S.C. Johnson employees and trucking companies that bilked the company of millions of dollars.

  • December 3, 2009

    Jury Convicts Petters In $3.6B Ponzi Trial

    A jury has convicted fallen business magnate Thomas J. Petters of carrying out a $3.6 billion Ponzi scheme, and the founder of Petters Group Worldwide LLC now faces the possibility of spending the rest of his life behind bars.

  • December 2, 2009

    EPA To Mull Quashing Bush-Era Fuel Emissions Rule

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has proposed the withdrawal of a Bush administration rule that went into effect the day President Barack Obama was sworn into office exempting certain manufacturing byproducts used for fuel from hazardous waste regulations.

  • December 2, 2009

    Amazon Loses Bid To Challenge Google Books Deal

    The federal judge overseeing the ongoing suit over the use of copyrighted works in Google Inc.'s online library has refused Amazon.com Inc.'s request to reconsider his preliminary approval of a revised settlement in the case, saying the court would address the nuanced issues during a fairness hearing in February.

  • December 2, 2009

    House Committee OKs New Federal Insurance Office

    Legislators have thrown their support behind the creation of a Federal Insurance Office that would have some authority to negotiate international insurance agreements and make recommendations regarding industry regulations.

  • December 2, 2009

    Ex-CFTC Chair Calls For Tougher OTC Derivative Regs

    Over-the-counter derivatives must be more heavily regulated to avoid a repeat of the current financial crisis, former U.S. Commodity Futures Trading Commission chair Brooksley Born told members of Congress in a hearing Wednesday.

  • December 2, 2009

    Senate Builds Support For Lowering Civil Pleading Bar

    U.S. Senate Judiciary Committee chairman Patrick Leahy, D-Vt., on Wednesday vowed to pass legislation reversing two recent Supreme Court rulings raising the civil pleading standard, saying the pair of narrow decisions are effectively closing citizens out of courthouses and undermining Congress.

  • December 2, 2009

    House Panel OKs Agency To Break Up Major Cos.

    The U.S. House of Representatives' Financial Services Committee on Wednesday approved a controversial bill giving federal authorities broad new powers to shrink and dismantle systemically significant companies, advancing a key piece of Democrats' financial regulatory reform package.

  • December 1, 2009

    Rothstein Pleads Not Guilty To $1.2B Ponzi Scheme

    South Florida lawyer Scott W. Rothstein has pled not guilty to federal charges that he operated a $1.2 billion Ponzi scheme out of his firm Rothstein Rosenfeldt & Adler PA.

  • December 1, 2009

    21 States Win $25M Settlement In Vitamin Suit

    Twenty-one states, the District of Columbia and Puerto Rico have won a $25 million settlement from a group of vitamin makers that allegedly conspired to fix vitamin prices between 1988 and 2000.

  • December 1, 2009

    European Vioxx Claims Don't Stand In US: 5th Circ.

    A federal appeals court has nixed a bid by a group of foreign citizens to join multidistrict product liability litigation in the U.S. over Merck & Co.'s painkiller Vioxx, clearing the way for those cases to be heard in their respective foreign forums.