We use cookies on this site to enable your digital experience. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our cookie policy. close

Corporate

  • August 14, 2018

    Tesla's Latham-Guided Panel To Study Take-Private Scenarios

    Tesla Inc. said Tuesday that its board of directors has formed a special committee, advised by Latham & Watkins LLP, that will evaluate any going-private proposals for the electric carmaker in the wake of a recent tweet by CEO Elon Musk that signaled his desire to take the company private.

  • August 14, 2018

    Investors Sue MoviePass Owners As Stock Bottoms Out

    Helios and Matheson Analytics Inc. investors filed a putative class action suit against the company alleging that it misled the public on the profitability of moviegoing subscription service MoviePass Inc. before the stock bottomed out, according to a filing in New York federal court Monday.

  • August 14, 2018

    Trump's WTO Appeals Blockade Slowing Progress In Geneva

    The Trump administration's blocking of new appointments to the World Trade Organization's Appellate Body has continued to create headaches in Geneva, as an appeals panel weighing a dispute between Japan and South Korea has postponed its decision indefinitely, according to a WTO document published Tuesday.

  • August 13, 2018

    David Boies On How Dyslexia Shaped His Practice

    One of the country’s highest-profile litigators, the Boies Schiller Flexner LLP chairman was diagnosed with dyslexia when he was in his 30s. In an interview with Law360, he talks about practicing law with the learning disability. This article is part of our special report on disability inclusion in the legal industry.

  • August 13, 2018

    BigLaw’s Mental Health Stigma Shows Signs Of Fading

    Sometimes viewed as an “invisible” disability, mental illness has long been forced under wraps because of the risk attorneys could face bias and stigma. Here’s how lawyers, law firms and other groups are starting to take on the status quo. This article is part of our special report on disability inclusion in the legal industry.

  • August 13, 2018

    Swiss Bank ZKB To Pay $98.5M For Role In US Tax Avoidance

    Swiss bank Zürcher Kantonalbank has agreed to pay $98.5 million after admitting to helping U.S. clients dodge taxes by letting them stash money in undeclared accounts that used code names and shell companies, Manhattan federal prosecutors announced Monday.

  • August 13, 2018

    10th Circ. Sides With AT&T Worker On Disability Benefits

    The Tenth Circuit on Monday affirmed an Oklahoma federal judge’s decision to reverse an AT&T benefit plan’s denial of short-term disability benefits to an employee, saying the plan acted arbitrarily and capriciously when denying the worker’s claim and upholding the judge’s award of 26 weeks of disability benefits.

  • August 13, 2018

    Lululemon Workers Poised To Get Cert. In FLSA Suit

    A New York federal magistrate judge Monday recommended the court certify a class of employees in a suit alleging fitness wear retailer Lululemon does not pay them for hours spent on mandatory community outreach and administrative work.

  • August 13, 2018

    Wells Fargo Worker Lacked Proof Of Age Bias: 8th Circ.

    The estate of a Wells Fargo worker fired after a past fraud conviction came to light did not show that the company’s implementation of a federal bar on employing those convicted of crimes of “dishonesty” violates federal age bias law, the Eighth Circuit said Monday.

  • August 13, 2018

    9th Circ. Rips Judicial Notice Trend In Securities Suits

    A Ninth Circuit panel on Monday took issue with a "concerning pattern" in securities fraud cases, saying corporate defendants are exploiting judicial notice procedures by submitting dozens of documents to improperly defeat viable complaints early in litigation.

  • August 13, 2018

    Elon Musk Says Saudis Expected To Fund Tesla Buyout

    Tesla CEO Elon Musk elaborated on Monday regarding his intention to take the electric-car maker private, revealing in a blog that he has discussed the matter with representatives of Saudi Arabia’s sovereign wealth fund, who he says are eager to provide funding for such a deal.

  • August 13, 2018

    Judge Rips Tata's 'Hail Mary' Bid In Discrimination Suit

    A California federal judge on Friday rebuffed Tata Consultancy Services Ltd.’s attempt to chop away at a class action accusing the information technology company of discriminating against non-South Asian employees, calling it "a Hail Mary effort at limiting the scope of relief" months before trial.

  • August 13, 2018

    Ex-JPMorgan Banker Gets 4 Years For Selling Customer Info

    A New York federal judge has sentenced a former JPMorgan Chase & Co. personal banker to four years in federal prison, after he admitted he stole customer account information and used the information to make unauthorized withdrawals, according to the U.S. Department of Justice.

  • August 13, 2018

    15 Minutes With WeWork's General Counsel

    WeWork general counsel Peter Greenspan's relationship with the company began in 2014 when he was approached to help the rapidly growing office space sharing startup hire a real estate lawyer. Greenspan, an alumnus of Willkie Farr & Gallagher LLP, spoke to Law360 recently about his first three years at WeWork, what makes for an ideal partnership with outside counsel and why the legal department at WeWork is so special.

  • August 10, 2018

    How The Legal Industry Lets Down Lawyers With Disabilities

    The dissolution of a five-year-old bar group marks the latest setback for disabled attorneys, who often find little support while navigating an inhospitable industry. This is the first article in a special report on disability inclusion in the legal industry.

  • August 10, 2018

    Gaining Access: Disabled Lawyers Share Their Stories

    In a series of interviews, lawyers tell Law360 how even well-intentioned professors can create barriers, how inclusivity can help a firm’s litigation prowess, and how “inspirational” can be a dirty word. This article is part of our special report on disability inclusion in the legal industry.

  • August 10, 2018

    Business Groups Take Up Fight To Amend Calif. Privacy Law

    More than three dozen business groups from the tech, retail, health, banking and other sectors are pushing California lawmakers working on making "technical" changes to a hastily enacted landmark privacy law to address some of the more "unworkable" aspects of the statute and to extend the compliance deadline. 

  • August 10, 2018

    Investor Hits Tesla, Musk With Fraud Claims Over Tweet

    An investor hit Tesla Inc. and its founder Elon Musk with a proposed securities fraud class action Friday in California federal court, claiming they tried to pump up stock prices by proclaiming plans to take the company private — without having the more than $71 billion privatizing would require.

  • August 10, 2018

    Oracle Slapped With Securities Fraud Suit After Stock Drop

    Investors filed a proposed securities fraud class action Friday against Oracle in California federal court, holding the technology giant responsible for a one-day stock price plunge of 9.4 percent and alleging the company’s cloud revenues were driven by unsustainable “coercive” sales tactics.

  • August 10, 2018

    Entire Mass. Earned Sick Time Law Is Preempted, Court Rules

    A Massachusetts federal judge ruled Friday that the state’s entire Earned Sick Time Law is preempted by the federal Railroad Unemployment Insurance Act and cannot be enforced against railroads, expanding an appellate court’s ruling that found only one section covering just a worker’s own sick leave was preempted.

Expert Analysis

  • Series

    Clerking For Ginsburg: 3 Surprises

    David Post

    It had never occurred to me that judges don’t always love the way their appellate cousins review their work and tell them — in public — all the things they got wrong. I was frequently struck by Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s acute awareness of the delicacy of this relationship, says attorney David Post.

  • Employment Litigation And Jury Opinions In A #MeToo World

    Ellen Brickman

    Jurors’ beliefs about social inequality, intergroup differences and disparate treatment are likely to play a role in their evaluations of discrimination and harassment claims, especially in the current political climate. To understand that role better, we undertook a survey of registered voters in New York and Los Angeles, say Ellen Brickman and Chad Lackey of DOAR Inc.

  • What Cos. Must Know About The Return Of Iran Sanctions

    F. Amanda DeBusk

    President Donald Trump signed an executive order on Aug. 6 formally re-imposing certain sanctions with respect to Iran. Given the administration’s rapidly shifting approach to international trade and national security issues, businesses should plan for the worst — while continuing to advocate for a more pragmatic approach, say attorneys with Dechert LLP.

  • How Taxpayers Are Taking To Tax Reform So Far

    Nickolas Gianou

    The effects of last year’s tax overhaul, the most significant since 1986, have not been as drastic as some expected. Still, taxpayers have begun to adjust and a number of significant trends are emerging, say Nickolas Gianou and Sally Thurston of Skadden Arps Slate Meagher & Flom LLP.

  • ERISA Class Actions After Epic Systems

    James Baker

    U.S. Supreme Court Justice Neil Gorsuch's opinion in Epic Systems v. Lewis employed the same analytics used by Justice Antonin Scalia in three previous decisions. They strongly suggest the court would allow a mandatory arbitration clause with a class action waiver in the Employee Retirement Income Security Act context, says James Baker of Baker McKenzie.

  • Series

    Clerking For Ginsburg: A Superhero Supreme

    Burden Walker

    As a clerk for Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, my job was to mirror my boss’ views and values in everything I did. Years later, I find that I am still striving to live up to the values Justice Ginsburg instilled in me, as both a lawyer and a spouse, says Burden Walker, an assistant U.S. attorney for the District of Maryland.

  • New Mass. Law Would Make Enforcing Noncompetes Harder

    Bret Cohen

    Massachusetts recently passed comprehensive noncompete legislation, which will become effective on Oct. 1, 2018, assuming it is signed by Gov. Charlie Baker. The new law would place significant limitations on the scope of enforceable employee noncompetes, say Bret Cohen and Michael Steinberg of Nelson Mullins Riley & Scarborough LLP

  • AI In Lending: Key Challenges And Practical Considerations

    David Stein

    A recent report from the U.S. Treasury Department discussed the use of artificial intelligence in financial services and identified related legal challenges. There is little risk of financial regulators taking proactive steps to restrict the use of AI, but existing laws and regulations adopted long before its advent remain in effect, says David Stein of Covington & Burling LLP.

  • Insurance Can Mitigate Costs Of Government Investigations

    Annette Ebright

    If companies take the proper steps before and after being subjected to government investigations, their insurance policies may serve as a reliable hedge against the financial consequences. However, these policies have their limitations, say Annette Ebright and Daniel Peterson of Parker Poe Adams & Bernstein LLP.

  • Series

    Clerking For Ginsburg: 4 RBG Lessons On Having It All

    Rachel Wainer Apter

    Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg is everything she is cracked up to be​ — f​eminist icon​, brilliant jurist​, fierce dissenter. She is also an incredible boss, mentor and friend.​ ​Her advice has shaped how I have tried to balance building a career and ​raising children, says Rachel Wainer Apter, counsel to the New Jersey attorney general.