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Cybersecurity & Privacy

  • June 20, 2018

    Comcast Unit Can't Arbitrate Class Action Over Robocalls

    An Illinois federal judge on Wednesday rejected a Comcast subsidiary’s bid to arbitrate a man’s proposed class action accusing the company of auto-dialing customers looking for other people, saying his claims fall outside the service agreement Comcast is trying to hold him to.

  • June 20, 2018

    Navient Agrees To Pay $2.5M To End Robocall Class Action

    A woman who claims Navient Solutions LLC pestered her with unwanted robocalls pressed a Virginia federal judge to sign off on the parties' proposed $2.5 million class action deal, arguing that the pact was a “good result” in light of a recent D.C. Circuit ruling that “enhanced” Navient’s core autodialer defense. 

  • June 20, 2018

    Irish Cloud Coin Co. Breached US Securities Law, Suit Says

    An Irish cryptocurrency startup that sold digital tokens to fund a decentralized cloud computing platform was hit with a proposed class action in Pennsylvania federal court claiming it breached U.S. securities laws by not registering its business with American regulators.

  • June 20, 2018

    Ex-CIA Worker Denies Feeding US Secrets To WikiLeaks

    A New York man accused of stealing secrets while working for the Central Intelligence Agency in 2016 and feeding them to WikiLeaks pled not guilty Wednesday to charges of stealing and transmitting national defense information and asked for time to consider if he will consent to proceeding in Manhattan federal court.

  • June 20, 2018

    Trump, Lawmakers Make Limited Progress On ZTE Deal

    Lawmakers said Wednesday they had made some progress toward a deal to lift sanctions imposed on Chinese telecommunications equipment maker ZTE Corp. after a meeting with President Donald Trump, the day after a bipartisan bill to protect the federal supply chain, prompted in part by ZTE, was introduced in the Senate.

  • June 20, 2018

    3rd Circ. Backs Coke's Win In Ex-Worker's Data Breach Suit

    The Third Circuit on Wednesday backed a Pennsylvania federal court’s decision to kill a former Coca Cola Co. employee's putative class action over identity theft that allegedly stemmed from the theft of old work computers, finding the former employee can’t show he was damaged as a result of Coke’s conduct.

  • June 20, 2018

    Tesla Accuses Ex-Worker Of Hacking, Stealing Trade Secrets

    Tesla Inc. hit a former process technician with a lawsuit in Nevada federal court Tuesday, accusing him of hacking into the company’s system, stealing gigabytes of Tesla’s confidential data and trade secrets and then transferring that information to third parties.

  • June 20, 2018

    House Passes Bills On Opioid Patient Info Sharing, Treatment

    The U.S. House of Representatives on Wednesday passed more bills aimed at tackling the nation's opioid crisis, including a measure allowing medical professionals to share information about patients with opioid use disorder and another providing more treatment options for addicted Medicaid recipients.

  • June 20, 2018

    Comcast Opened Xfinity Accounts Without OK, Customers Say

    A proposed class of Comcast Corp. customers slapped the company with a lawsuit in Illinois federal court Tuesday claiming it shared their personal data with a subsidiary to help launch its Xfinity Mobile service, which led to unauthorized parties using that data to order cellphones and shoulder the customers with the charges.

  • June 20, 2018

    Definition Of 'New' Preserves TransUnion Suit Against Equifax

    An Illinois federal judge kept alive TransUnion’s suit alleging that fellow credit report giant Equifax underpaid for using TransUnion’s credit monitoring services for victims of last summer’s massive data breach, finding that the headline-grabbing hack occurred before the two firms’ breach-related discount rate kicked in.

  • June 20, 2018

    Sen. Wyden Presses Ross For Views On ZTE's Cyberthreat

    Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross evaded questions from Sen. Ron Wyden, D-Ore., on the cybersecurity threats posed by ZTE Corp. on Wednesday as the lawmaker probed for answers about the Trump administration’s decision to give the Chinese telecom giant a reprieve for its sanctions violations.

  • June 20, 2018

    'Let Canada Handle It,' ICO Promoter Says Of SEC Fraud Suit

    A Canadian man who organized an initial coin offering that the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission claims was a $15 million fraud told a Brooklyn federal judge in court Wednesday that the regulator had gone too far and called for the suit to be dismissed, saying authorities in Canada are already “all over this.”

  • June 20, 2018

    AT&T, Illinois Bell Dropped From Robocall TCPA Suit

    An AT&T affiliate and the Illinois Bell Telephone Co. have been dropped from an AT&T customer's proposed federal class action over unsolicited phone calls, leaving a third-party contractor that purportedly placed calls for the telecommunications giant to face claims it violated the Telephone Consumer Protection Act.

  • June 20, 2018

    Cruise Co. Free To Fight Any Claims In $76M Robocall Deal

    The settlement in a robocall class action against a cruise marketing company that could allow call recipients to collect up to $76 million did not put a cap on the number of claimed calls the company could challenge, an Illinois federal judge.

  • June 19, 2018

    Fla. Consumer Seeks Class Cert. In Burger King Receipt Suit

    A Florida man asked a federal court Monday to certify a proposed class of customers who received printed receipts at Burger King restaurants revealing more digits of their credit card than allowed under the Fair and Accurate Credit Transactions Act, exposing them to the risk of identity theft.

  • June 19, 2018

    Facebook App Creator Backs Data Privacy Regulation Efforts

    U.S. Senate lawmakers and cybersecurity experts, including the creator of the app that allowed Cambridge Analytica to harvest millions of unwitting Facebook users’ data, on Tuesday agreed that online companies need more formal data collection and sharing rules, although some balked at the suggestion that regulation should hew too closely to the European Union's current framework.

  • June 19, 2018

    'Silk Road' Laptop Said To Have Dirt On Alleged Sidekick

    A Canadian man on Tuesday denied helping incarcerated Silk Road founder Ross Ulbricht run his infamous web bazaar for illegal drugs, and a prosecutor told the Manhattan federal judge overseeing the case that the government will use chats from Ulbricht's seized laptop in its effort to convict his alleged right-hand man.

  • June 19, 2018

    Verizon, AT&T Say They Will Cut Off Location-Data Sellers

    Verizon and AT&T will end business relationships with third-party companies that buy cellphone users' location data, an Oregon senator who had called attention to prison phone operator Securus Technologies Inc. buying and releasing of users' location details said Tuesday.

  • June 19, 2018

    Cybersecurity Firm That Probed DNC Hack Now Worth $3B

    Cybersecurity company CrowdStrike, which was hired to investigate the high-profile Democratic National Committee hacks before the 2016 U.S. presidential election, said Tuesday that it is now worth $3 billion after raising $200 million in new funding.

  • June 19, 2018

    DC Circ. Grounds Battle Over Privacy In FAA Drone Rules

    The D.C. Circuit tossed a petition by the Electronic Privacy Information Center on Tuesday that sought to review small drone rules promulgated by the Federal Aviation Administration, finding the nonprofit lacked standing to mount a challenge over the exclusion of privacy safeguards.

Expert Analysis

  • An Anti-SLAPP Motion In Name Only

    Joseph Gjonola

    The Ninth Circuit’s decision last month in Planned Parenthood v. Center for Medical Progress has effectively turned the anti-SLAPP motion into a hybrid of typical motions to dismiss and motions for summary judgment. As a result, defendants have lost the primary benefit of the anti-SLAPP process, says Joseph Gjonola of Roxborough Pomerance Nye & Adreani LLP.

  • Bristol-Myers Squibb: 1 Year Later

    Adam Pollet

    In the year since the U.S. Supreme Court decided Bristol-Myers Squibb Co. v. Superior Court of California — limiting where plaintiffs can bring claims and curbing forum-shopping in mass tort litigation — courts have grappled with questions that the ruling did not address, and defendants have pursued jurisdictional defenses in class actions and federal cases that were not previously available, say attorneys with Eversheds Sutherland LLP.

  • FTC In Full Force: What To Expect From New Leadership

    Lucy Morris

    While headlines proliferate about the recent political shake-ups at the nascent Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, the century-old Federal Trade Commission, with less fanfare, finally has a full slate of five commissioners for the first time since 2015, say Lucy Morris and Kavitha Subramanian of Hudson Cook LLP.

  • An Unprecedented Look Inside The FARA Unit

    Brian Fleming

    For close observers of the Foreign Agents Registration Act, the June 8 release by the U.S. Department of Justice of over 50 FARA advisory opinions was a watershed. These opinions offer an unprecedented glimpse into how the FARA Registration Unit interprets the law, say Brian Fleming and Andrew Herman of Miller & Chevalier Chtd.

  • House Hearing Stirs Debate On Insuring Autonomous Vehicles

    Susan Lent

    A U.S. House subcommittee hearing last month on self-driving vehicles and the future of insurance highlighted stakeholders' differing views on whether technology companies should be legally required to provide insurers with vehicle data. A failure to reach agreement on data sharing will hamper the legislative process, say attorneys with Akin Gump Strauss Hauer & Feld LLP.

  • Why Lawyers Shouldn't Accept Fees In Cryptocurrency: Part 2

    John Reed Stark

    The legal industry has already begun to feel the impact of anti-bribery and anti-money laundering requirements. When involved with cryptocurrency trading and remittance, law firms face more than the risk of being perceived as organizations that support money laundering practices, says John Reed Stark of John Reed Stark Consulting LLC.

  • What To Know About New Colo. Data Privacy Law

    Erin Eiselein

    Colorado recently enacted a sweeping new data security law that will impact businesses throughout the country. Although it does not go into effect until Sept. 1, companies should begin preparing for it well before that date, say attorneys with Brownstein Hyatt Farber Schreck LLP​​​​​​​.

  • Product Liability Meets The Internet Of Things At The CPSC

    Heather Bramble

    At last month's U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission hearing on connected devices and product safety, presenters raised issues ranging from health and privacy concerns to terrorism risks, insurance requirements and product standards. Stakeholders must closely monitor regulatory developments, but also prepare for possible action from Congress, say Heather Capell Bramble and Thomasina Poirot of Venable LLP.

  • From The 1st Billboards To '3 Billboards': A Legal Evolution

    Karina Saranovic

    During movie awards season this year, "Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri" highlighted the power of a communication medium that some believe has been unduly muzzled over time through regulation and legal challenges, says Karina Saranovic of Delman Vukmanovic LLP.

  • Why Lawyers Shouldn't Accept Fees In Cryptocurrency: Part 1

    John Reed Stark

    Law firms are increasingly accepting cryptocurrency as payment for services. While this might seem innovative and forward-thinking, ironically it is much more of a throwback, says John Reed Stark of John Reed Stark Consulting LLC.