Cybersecurity & Privacy

  • February 16, 2018

    Intel Says Chip Security Flaws Led To 30+ Suits Against It

    Intel said on Friday in a regulatory filing that it is facing more than 30 lawsuits, including proposed consumer and securities class actions, over the discovery in 2017 that security flaws, dubbed Spectre and Meltdown, make virtually every computer chip vulnerable to hacking.

  • February 16, 2018

    Santa Monica Seeks To Toss Airbnb, HomeAway Rental Suit

    The city of Santa Monica asked a California federal judge to toss a suit by home-sharing websites Airbnb and HomeAway challenging an ordinance that requires landlords renting rooms through their sites to first get a license, arguing the legislation is essential to helping the city counter a mounting housing crisis.

  • February 16, 2018

    Mueller Charges 13 Russians With US Election Tampering

    Thirteen Russian nationals and three organizations were charged on Friday with crimes related to interference in U.S. politics, including attempts to influence U.S. voters in favor of then-candidate Donald Trump during the 2016 presidential election, Special Counsel Robert Mueller announced.

  • February 16, 2018

    Hiscox Escapes Trial As Illness Halts Data Protection Case

    The Information Commissioner’s Office will not seek a retrial in its case against Hiscox Underwriting Ltd. over alleged breaches of data protection laws, because a key witness has fallen ill and will not be able to give evidence, a London court heard Friday.

  • February 15, 2018

    Congress Needs To Tackle Overseas Warrant Row, Rep Says

    The U.S. Supreme Court shouldn’t have the last word on whether the federal government should be allowed to access data stored overseas by companies such as Microsoft, but instead federal lawmakers need to act to remove the legal “hodgepodge” fueling the dispute, a Republican congressman said Thursday.

  • February 15, 2018

    Ill. Trader Accused Of Embezzling $2M In Cryptocurrency

    A Chicago man was charged with the city’s first criminal prosecution involving the cryptocurrency trading industry on Thursday, as 24-year-old trader Joseph Kim was charged with fraud for allegedly misappropriating $2 million in Bitcoin and Litecoin.

  • February 15, 2018

    Ex-ICE Attorney Cops To Stealing Immigrant IDs

    A former top attorney at U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement's Seattle branch has pled guilty to charges he stole the identity of seven immigrants and attempted to use that information to defraud several major financial institutions, his attorney announced Thursday.

  • February 15, 2018

    Facebook, Twitter Still Violating Consumer Law, EU Says

    Facebook and Twitter have taken some recent steps to comply with European consumer law, but could still face sanctions over their processes for deleting user content, according to a European Commission report released Thursday.

  • February 15, 2018

    2nd Circ. Rejects Citizens United Challenge To NY Donor Law

    A Second Circuit panel on Thursday upheld a New York state law forcing tax-exempt nonprofits to disclose their donors, nixing claims from conservative advocacy group Citizens United that the rule caused a “climate of fear” that could unconstitutionally stifle contributions.

  • February 15, 2018

    Judge Says DOJ Refusal To Admit It Had Dossier A 'Hard Sell'

    The declassification of a congressional memo regarding a Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act warrant for a former Trump campaign adviser creates a “hard sell” for the government to avoid confirming, as sought by digital media company BuzzFeed, possession of a dossier containing salacious allegations on Donald Trump, a D.C. federal judge said Thursday.

  • February 15, 2018

    Agencies Better At Cybersecurity Than Vendors, Study Says

    Cybersecurity at contractors is lagging behind that of federal agencies, security ratings firm BitSight said in a report Thursday, a day after a U.S. Department of Homeland Security official revealed DHS had launched an initiative for agencies to study cybersecurity throughout their supply chains.

  • February 15, 2018

    US, UK Officials Blame Russia For 'NotPetya' Cyberattack

    The U.S. and U.K. governments blamed Russia on Thursday for a June 2017 cyberattack that paralyzed part of Ukraine’s infrastructure and wreaked havoc on computers worldwide, including at DLA Piper.

  • February 15, 2018

    Senator Skeptical Of $31.5M Sought For CFTC 2019 Budget

    The chairman of an influential Senate committee on Thursday voiced strong opposition to user fees proposed by the Trump administration to supplement funding for the U.S. Commodities Futures Trading Commission, casting doubt on $31.5 million the agency is seeking above its 2018 funding level.

  • February 15, 2018

    PlanetRisk Gets Up To $79M Cybersecurity Contract From DHS

    Risk analytics company PlanetRisk has secured an up to $79 million contract to provide program management support over the next five years for a U.S. Department of Homeland Security office tasked with ensuring the cybersecurity of the federal government, the company said Thursday.

  • February 15, 2018

    A Chat With Hogan Lovells HR Chief Allison Friend

    In this monthly series, legal recruiting experts at Major Lindsey & Africa interview management from top law firms about navigating an increasingly competitive business environment. Here we feature Allison Friend, chief human resources officer for Hogan Lovells.

  • February 14, 2018

    7th Circ. Wants Extra Briefing On Fees In TCPA Cruise Deal

    A Seventh Circuit panel on Wednesday sharply questioned the ripeness of an appeal claiming that an award of attorneys’ fees in a $56 million-plus settlement of a Telephone Consumer Protection Act class action was potentially $3 million too high, and demanded supplemental briefing.

  • February 14, 2018

    NY Cybersecurity Rules Will Be Enforced As They Mature

    New York's financial regulator has been relatively quiet since first-of-their-kind cybersecurity rules took effect last year, but attorneys expect that the first wave of compliance certifications due Thursday and looming deadlines to implement more technically complex aspects of the regulation will trigger an enforcement blitz.

  • February 14, 2018

    House Passes Changes To CFPB, SEC Disclosure Rules

    The House of Representatives passed a package of bills Wednesday altering CFPB mortgage disclosure rules, SEC oversight rules and companies’ disclosure requirements, with backers saying the legislation would help encourage growth in the markets.

  • February 14, 2018

    AT&T Beats Consumers' Class Cert. Bid In Robocall Case

    A group of consumers suing telecom giant AT&T for robocalls the company allegedly made was denied class certification Wednesday after AT&T told the court late last year that it denies the bulk of the allegations made in the lawsuit.

  • February 14, 2018

    FTC Picks Prodded On Tech, Data Safety At Senate Hearing

    The four nominees seeking to fill posts on the Federal Trade Commission appeared in front of a Senate committee on Wednesday, answering questions from lawmakers about the power of big technology companies and consumer protection issues surrounding data breaches and privacy.

Expert Analysis

  • How To Serve Your Blind Client Effectively

    Julia Satti Cosentino

    While a client’s visual impairment can create challenges for an attorney, it also can open up an opportunity for both attorney and client to learn from each other. By taking steps to better assist clients who are blind or visually impaired, attorneys can become more perceptive and effective advisers overall, say Julia Satti Cosentino and Nicholas Stabile of Nutter McClennen & Fish LLP.

  • Opinion

    Evolving Due Process In The Digital Age

    Stephen Kane

    Because courts have not modernized as quickly as companies like Amazon, Tesla and Apple, Americans are becoming increasingly dissatisfied, but technological innovations may be able to help Americans access their due process, says Stephen Kane of FairClaims.

  • Centers Of Influence Are Key To Small Law Firm Rainmaking

    Frank Carone

    In a national survey of 378 small law firms, partners ranked client referrals as the most important means of business development. Yet studies reveal that while professional services providers obtain most new clients from existing client referrals, their best new clients — the ones providing the largest pool of investable assets — overwhelmingly come from “centers of influence,” says Frank Carone, an executive partner at Abrams Fensterman.

  • Beware ICO Lawyers, You're The Next Target

    John Reed Stark

    Chairman Jay Clayton of the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission recently gave an extraordinary speech reiterating his concerns about initial coin offerings while also adding a new twist. It's gatekeeper liability redux at the SEC, and lawyers connected to ICOs should be watching their backs, says John Reed Stark, president of John Reed Stark Consulting LLC.

  • Feature

    From Law Firm To Newsroom: An Interview With Bob Woodruff

    Randy Maniloff

    Lawyers who have left the traditional practice for perceived greener pastures are many. But the circumstances surrounding broadcast journalist Bob Woodruff’s departure are unique. Like none I’ve ever heard, says Randy Maniloff of White and Williams LLP.

  • Series

    Judging A Book: Kendall Reviews 'On The Jury Trial'

    Judge Virginia Kendall

    As someone who spent half her days last year on the bench presiding over trials, I often find the alarmist calls to revamp the jury trial system a tad puzzling — why is making trial lawyers better rarely discussed? Then along comes a refreshing little manual called "On the Jury Trial: Principles and Practices for Effective Advocacy," by Thomas Melsheimer and Judge Craig Smith, says U.S. District Judge Virginia Kendall of the Northe... (continued)

  • Lessons For Data Breach Lawyers From Product Liability

    Michael Ruttinger

    Lawyers in data breach litigation can learn from their contemporaries in more established fields such as product liability, where the law has developed well-established approaches to many of the same issues that will arise in the merits stage of data breach cases, says Michael Ruttinger of Tucker Ellis LLP.

  • Do I Need New Trial Counsel? 9 Questions To Ask

    Russell Hayman

    Initial selection of defense counsel is usually made at the outset of litigation, long before it is known whether the case may actually proceed to trial. Attorneys with McDermott Will & Emery discuss questions in-house lawyers should consider when deciding whether their litigation counsel should remain lead trial counsel in a case proceeding to trial.

  • CFTC Reasserts Its Role In Virtual Currency Regulation

    Christopher Conniff

    Virtual currency market participants should be mindful of the U.S. Commodity Futures Trading Commission, which announced three enforcement actions in the past week. The CFTC is arguably better positioned to fight virtual currency fraud than the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission, say attorneys with Ropes & Gray LLP.

  • And Now A Word From The Panel: 2017 MDL Year In Review

    Alan Rothman

    Last year, the Judicial Panel on Multidistrict Litigation ruled on the fewest MDL petitions and created the fewest new MDL proceedings in decades. But the panel's schedule for this week's hearing session suggests 2018 may be different, says Alan Rothman of Arnold & Porter Kaye Scholer LLP.