Cybersecurity & Privacy

  • December 1, 2017

    Media Co. Hit With Suit Over Scanning Workers' Fingerprints

    Multimedia Sales & Marketing Inc. has been slapped with a proposed class action in Illinois court alleging the company has been requiring its employees to clock in and out of work by scanning their fingerprints without their prior approval, in violation of the state's Biometric Privacy Act.

  • December 1, 2017

    Flynn Legal Team Stocked With Washington 'Dealmakers'

    The trio of Washington, D.C., veterans who guided former National Security Adviser Michael Flynn to a plea deal include an outspoken political lawyer who created ad campaigns for the Russian government after the breakup of the Soviet Union, a former corruption prosecutor and an attorney with a White House resume.

  • December 1, 2017

    Ex-NSA Employee Pleads Guilty To Stealing Classified Docs

    A former National Security Agency hacking software developer pled guilty before a Maryland federal judge Friday to charges that he wrongfully took classified national security information and retained it at his Maryland home, the U.S. Department of Justice said.

  • December 1, 2017

    Russia Sanctions Emerge As Mueller Probe Lightning Rod

    U.S. sanctions on Russia began as an Obama administration effort to punish Moscow for its aggression in the Crimean peninsula nearly four years ago, but they have now emerged as patient zero in a bombshell political scandal that escalated Friday morning with the guilty plea of President Donald Trump's former adviser Michael Flynn.

  • December 1, 2017

    3rd Circ. Denies Full Court Redo In Traveler's TSA Dispute

    The Third Circuit on Friday said it will not revisit a panel’s finding saying that Transportation Security Administration airport screeners cannot be sued for allegedly retaliating against travelers who exercise free speech, delivering a blow to an architect who said he was falsely accused of making a bomb threat.

  • December 1, 2017

    UK Court Finds Supermarket Chain Liable In Data Breach Case

    A U.K. High Court judge on Friday ruled that supermarket chain Morrisons is partly liable for a staffer’s theft of the payroll data of nearly 100,000 of his fellow employees, finding that the company was vicariously liable to a class of employees as the data theft occurred during the course of the man’s employment.

  • December 1, 2017

    House Panel Approves Surveillance Renewal Bill

    The House Intelligence Committee on Friday approved a bill that would renew foreign surveillance authorities while adding new privacy and oversight provisions, despite the objections of Democrats, who cited concerns with its changes to “unmasking” authority.

  • December 1, 2017

    Lyft, Jobcase Told To Mediate Consumers' Spam-Text Claims

    A Florida federal judge on Friday ordered ride-hailing giant Lyft Inc. and employment social network Jobcase to resolve in mediation a proposed class action over allegedly unsolicited spam texts, just three weeks after the suit was filed.

  • December 1, 2017

    Taxation With Representation: Debevoise, Clifford, Sullivan

    In this week’s Taxation with Representation, Meredith Corp. acquired Time Inc. for $2.8 billion, Thoma Bravo picked up Barracuda for $1.6 billion, Cerberus snapped up BBVA’s real estate business for $4.74 billion and Altran shelled out $2 billion for Aricent.

  • December 1, 2017

    Flynn Pleads Guilty To Lying To FBI About Talks With Russia

    Michael Flynn, the former national security adviser to President Donald Trump, pled guilty Friday to lying to the FBI about his conversations with Russia's ambassador in December 2016, talks where prosecutors say the retired Army general served as a go-between for “senior” and “very senior” Trump transition officials.

  • November 30, 2017

    Kirkland's Should Face Receipt Row Under Spokeo: Magistrate

    A Pennsylvania magistrate judge on Wednesday advised against tossing a putative class action accusing retailer Kirkland's Inc. of printing too many credit card digits on receipts, finding the consumers needn't allege actual or imminent identity theft to establish standing under the U.S. Supreme Court's Spokeo decision.

  • November 30, 2017

    Feds Charge 13 In Hack Of Ride-Hailing Drivers' Accounts

    New York federal prosecutors revealed charges against 13 people allegedly responsible for hacking into ride-hailing companies’ drivers’ accounts and siphoning money out, saying Thursday that the team stole millions from company accounts to enrich themselves.

  • November 30, 2017

    Facebook Biometric Data Row May Hinge On 'Right To Say No'

    A California federal judge Thursday seemed poised to preserve a proposed class action over Facebook’s collection of biometric data, saying that the social media giant may have violated users’ statutory “right to say no” and that he was unconvinced the U.S. Supreme Court’s Spokeo decision required that they allege real-world harm.

  • November 30, 2017

    San Bernardino Victims Claim Social Networks Aided ISIS

    Victims of the 2015 mass shooting in San Bernardino, California, on Thursday accused Facebook Inc., Twitter Inc. and Google Inc. of allowing ISIS to “crowdsource terrorism” on their websites, thereby aiding and abetting terrorism by giving the group platforms to recruit new members and profit.

  • November 30, 2017

    DOJ Wants 9/11 FBI Docs Kept Closed At 11th Circ.

    The U.S. Department of Justice on Wednesday defended the FBI’s “extensive search” for documents related to potential Saudi involvement in the 9/11 attacks sought by a Florida news organization, urging the Eleventh Circuit not to revive the lawsuit and to upend a mandate requiring identification of agents and sources.

  • November 30, 2017

    JPML Judges Say Atlanta Best Site For Equifax MDL

    The U.S. Judicial Panel on Multidistrict Litigation will likely centralize litigation over the Equifax data breach in Atlanta, with several judges on the panel saying Thursday that keeping the cases near the credit reporting company’s headquarters makes the most sense.

  • November 30, 2017

    Writer Says Ex-Lover Used Spyware to Steal, Sell Story

    Best-selling author Emma Cline and her ex-boyfriend filed clashing lawsuits in California federal court Wednesday, surfacing a bitter private fight in which the novelist’s former lover accuses her of using spyware to steal and plagiarize his works, charges she forcefully denies.

  • November 30, 2017

    Google Faces UK Suit Over IPhone Snooping Claims

    A consumer watchdog on Thursday filed what he called Britain’s first proposed class action against a tech giant for allegedly misusing personal data, claiming that Google Inc. breached iPhone privacy settings to illegally collect records on more than 5 million U.K. residents.

  • November 30, 2017

    Squire Patton Acquires Cybersecurity Litigation Boutique

    Squire Patton Boggs LLP has acquired the litigation boutique Yarbrough Law Group PC in Dallas, bolstering its litigation capabilities and expanding its white collar, cybersecurity, data privacy and intellectual property practice, Squire Patton Boggs said Thursday.

  • November 30, 2017

    Coinbase Must Give Info To IRS For Transactions Over $20K

    A California federal judge on Wednesday handed the Internal Revenue Service a partial win in the agency’s bid to seek records from Coinbase Inc., saying the virtual currency exchange must hand over information on accounts with transactions of greater than $20,000.

Expert Analysis

  • Connected Products For Kids: Compliance Beyond COPPA

    J. Nicci Warr

    Manufacturers of "smart" products that collect, transmit or store data related to a child should be aware that, while compliance with the Children's Online Privacy Protection Act is crucial, other federal and state laws may also apply — and are likely to be strictly enforced when children’s personal information is at issue, says J. Nicci Warr of Stinson Leonard Street LLP.

  • How IT And Procurement Pros Can Inform Law Firm Budgeting

    Steve Falkin

    As law firms begin preparing for their annual budget review, Steve Falkin and Lee Garbowitz of HBR Consulting discuss why firm leaders should give their internal information technology and procurement teams a seat at the table.

  • Getting Real About Artificial Intelligence At Law Firms

    Mark Williamson

    Artificial intelligence needs to be legally defensible in order to be useful to law firms. There are requirements for making this happen, says Mark Williamson, co-founder and chief technology officer of Hanzo Archives Ltd.

  • Perception Vs. Reality At Trial

    Martha Luring

    The long litigation life cycle for large, complex civil lawsuits provides ample time for clients and counsel to form strong opinions — often negative when based on adversarial exchanges — about the opposing trial team, their witnesses and their experts. Martha Luring of Salmons Consulting shares some common perceptions not always shared by jurors.

  • Proportionality, Not Perfection, Is What Matters

    John Rosenthal

    A few jurists and commentators have recently caused a stir in the e-discovery community by arguing that litigants should avoid using keyword searches to filter or cull a document population before using predictive coding. This “no-cull” rationale undermines the principle of proportionality at the heart of the recent changes to Federal Rule 26, say John Rosenthal and Jason Moore of Winston & Strawn LLP.

  • High Court Gets Ready To Weigh Privacy Vs. Public Safety

    Bob Anderson

    On Nov. 29, the U.S. Supreme Court will hear arguments in Carpenter v. United States — a case that could dramatically affect the future of surveillance, potentially requiring law enforcement to secure a warrant each time it seeks cell tower data and similar types of metadata, says Bob Anderson, leader of Navigant Consulting Inc.'s information security practice.

  • Florida Amendment 7 Objections Are On Life Support

    Corey Lapin

    Although the citizens of Florida voted to amend the state's constitution in 2004 to allow nearly unfettered access to records of “adverse medical incidents,” defendants have continued to use new and refined theories in response to Amendment 7 discovery requests. The recent ruling in Edwards v. Thomas may put an end to many of these tactics, says Cory Lapin of Manion Gaynor & Manning LLP.

  • Make Way For The 'Unicorns'

    Lucy Endel Bassli

    By "unicorn" I don’t mean the next great tech startup with a valuation of $1 billion. I mean the new breed of lawyers realizing that there are better ways to get their day jobs done, says Lucy Endel Bassli, assistant general counsel leading the legal operations and contracting functions at Microsoft Corp.

  • Series

    Judging A Book: McConnell Reviews 'Unequal'

    Judge John McConnell

    As widespread claims of sexual misconduct continue to surface in the entertainment industry and beyond, a discussion of how judges treat workplace discrimination cases may be particularly timely. Here, U.S. District Judge John McConnell reviews the book "Unequal: How America’s Courts Undermine Discrimination Law," by professors Sandra Sperino and Suja Thomas.

  • Roundup

    Making Pro Bono Work

    Pro Bono Thumbnail

    In this series, attorneys explore the challenges and rewards of pro bono volunteering in the legal profession.