Cybersecurity & Privacy

  • October 30, 2020

    Another Court Finds 5 Years Of TCPA Claims Invalid

    An Ohio federal judge became the second in the nation to adopt the argument that plaintiffs can't press Telephone Consumer Protection Act claims related to robocalls or texts that were placed between the period when Congress permitted robocalls regarding federally backed debts and when the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that exception to be unconstitutional.

  • October 30, 2020

    Working Group Gives Congress Robocall Prevention Report

    An interagency robocall working group tasked to evaluate prosecutions surrounding unwanted telemarketing calls sent lawmakers a report earlier this week outlining recommendations for preventing robocalls and the prosecution of those who facilitate those calls.

  • October 30, 2020

    UK Litigation Roundup: Here's What You Missed In London

    This week in London has seen Nigeria take aim at the U.K.'s National Crime Agency and a former dictator, British broadcasting giant Sky target scores of insurers and a mortgage portfolio company sue Simmons & Simmons LLP. Here, Law360 looks at those and other new claims in the U.K.

  • October 30, 2020

    Russian Tech Exec Loses Libel Case Over Trump Dossier Leak

    A Russian technology executive lost his libel case against the author of the infamous Trump dossier on Friday, as a judge said that even though the hacking allegations within the report were defamatory he had not shown that the former British intelligence officer behind the document leaked it to BuzzFeed.

  • October 30, 2020

    UK Fines Marriott £18.4M For Major Data Breach

    The U.K.'s data watchdog said on Friday that it has fined Marriott International £18.4 million ($23.7 million), a steep drop from the £99 million penalty that the regulator had initially proposed, after failings by the hotel group allowed a cyberattacker to steal the records of 339 million guests worldwide.

  • October 29, 2020

    2 More Ex-EBay Workers Cop To Cyberstalking Charges

    Two more former eBay workers on Thursday admitted to participating in a cyberstalking scheme to harass a Massachusetts couple who ran an e-commerce blog, bringing to five the number of defendants in the case who have entered guilty pleas.

  • October 29, 2020

    Starks Says Carriers Must Consider Open 5G Equipment

    FCC Commissioner Geoffrey Starks said Wednesday that wireless carriers receiving taxpayer funds should be required to at least consider interoperable 5G technology that is not specific to one vendor when replacing old equipment.

  • October 29, 2020

    Senator Asks Mnuchin for Sanctions on Russian Officers

    Bob Menendez, ranking Democrat on the Senate Foreign Relations committee, sent a letter to Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin Wednesday, calling for sanctions against Russian military officers from an intelligence unit that interfered with the 2016 presidential election.

  • October 29, 2020

    DOJ Asks Congress To Reform Law Shielding Web Platforms

    The U.S. Department of Justice has expressed support for reforming Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act, which provides legal protections to online platforms, or completely tossing the law and "starting on fresh canvas," echoing other voices in government calling for changes to the law.

  • October 29, 2020

    Digital Bank To Settle With Customers Over Service Outage

    Digital banking company Chime Financial and its customers on Wednesday got initial approval of a proposed settlement agreement from a California federal judge, which would end claims stemming from disruption of the company's services in October 2019.

  • October 29, 2020

    Aetna To Pay HHS $1M For Exposing Customer HIV Info

    Aetna will fork over $1 million to the government to resolve federal privacy law breaches for improperly disclosing policyholders' HIV information in multiple mailings, the latest settlement in a string of similar violations and promises by the health insurer to change its data handling practices.

  • October 29, 2020

    DirecTV Urges 9th Circ. To Rethink Split TCPA Ruling

    DirecTV on Wednesday urged the Ninth Circuit to reconsider a split panel ruling that determined the satellite service provider could not force a customer to arbitrate claims that it placed unauthorized robocalls.

  • October 29, 2020

    Meghan Markle Gets Privacy Trial Against Tabloid Postponed

    A London judge on Thursday granted Meghan Markle's request to postpone a scheduled January trial for her privacy case against the British tabloid that published her letter to her father without publicly disclosing the reasons for the delay.

  • October 29, 2020

    Facebook Sued In UK Over Cambridge Analytica Scandal

    A London law firm said on Thursday that it is suing Facebook on behalf of some one million users in England and Wales for allegedly allowing handing third-party developers such as the scandal-hit consultancy Cambridge Analytica access to their data without permission.

  • October 28, 2020

    Split En Banc 11th Circ. Vacates $6.3M Godiva FACTA Deal

    While Godiva did violate the Fair and Accurate Credit Transactions Act by including 10 credit card digits on shoppers' receipts, the shoppers have not properly alleged any concrete harm and therefore lack standing, a split en banc Eleventh Circuit ruled Wednesday while nixing a previously approved $6.3 million class settlement.

  • October 28, 2020

    How The Election Will Affect The Federal Privacy Law Fight

    Federal lawmakers have long struggled to craft privacy legislation that would dictate how companies use and share personal information, but if one party is able to control Congress and the presidency in this year's election, the prospects for a national standard are likely to increase significantly.

  • October 28, 2020

    Big Tech Execs Say They're Open To More Transparency Rules

    The chief executives of Twitter, Facebook and Google told lawmakers Wednesday that they're willing to submit to more transparency requirements for how they moderate user-posted content, but divergent concerns expressed by Democrats and Republicans demonstrated that a unified plan for reform is a long way off.

  • October 28, 2020

    Dems Ask FCC If Trump Interfered In Social Media Probe

    Two House Democrats have asked the Federal Communications Commission to clarify whether the White House or President Donald Trump's reelection campaign has interfered in a rulemaking that could crack down on perceived social media bias.

  • October 28, 2020

    Italy Opens Probe Into Google's Ad, Data Dominance

    Italy's competition authority has become the latest enforcer to target internet search giant Google over its dominance in the digital markets, launching an investigation Wednesday into alleged abuse in the country's €3.3 billion ($3.9 billion) online advertising space.

  • October 28, 2020

    Restaurant Chain Pays $1.8M To End Finger Scan Privacy Suit

    Nando's Restaurant Group Inc. will pay nearly $1.8 million to settle accusations that the South African restaurant chain unlawfully required current and former Illinois employees to scan their fingerprints to track work time without obtaining their informed consent.

  • October 28, 2020

    Experian Sues Insurers Zurich, SCOR For $18M In Legal Costs

    Consumer reporting giant Experian is suing two insurers in London to recoup legal costs of more than $18 million, citing multiple U.S class actions over data errors and pending investigations into a cyberattack on the credit bureau. 

  • October 28, 2020

    CEO Fraud Charges Drive Cybersecurity Co. NS8 Into Ch. 11

    Las Vegas, Nevada-based cybersecurity and fraud prevention business NS8 Inc. sought Chapter 11 protection in Delaware early Wednesday, saying it fell victim to its own fraud when a top officer allegedly overstated revenues in records used in part to attract $123 million from investors.

  • October 27, 2020

    Accenture Can't Escape Liability For Marriott Data Breach

    A cyberattack that exposed the personal details of at least 383 million people who stayed at Marriott International properties could be considered traceable to the alleged negligence of the hotel giant's consultants at Accenture, a Maryland federal judge has found.

  • October 27, 2020

    Dish Can't Take Back Unused $11M From $61M TCPA Verdict

    Dish Network is not going to be allowed to claw back roughly $11 million in undisbursed damages that it was forced to pay out for illegal telemarketing calls that were made on its behalf, a North Carolina federal judge ruled Tuesday.

  • October 27, 2020

    Eataly Workers Say Chicago Market Broke Ill. Privacy Law

    Eataly Chicago LLC has been hit with biometric privacy claims in Illinois state court, with a proposed class of employees accusing the Italian marketplace of violating their rights with its fingerprint timekeeping and authentication system.

Expert Analysis

  • The Unique Challenges Of Protecting A Law Firm Brand

    Author Photo

    Recent law firm trademark disputes highlight how the tension between legal ethics rules and trademark law can make it difficult for firms to select brands that are distinctive and entitled to protection, say Kimberly Maynard and Tyler Maulsby at Frankfurt Kurnit.

  • Auction Design Could Streamline TikTok's US Asset Sale

    Author Photo

    The potential sale of TikTok’s U.S. operations and assets pursuant to President Donald Trump's recent executive order affords an opportunity to examine how a combinatorial auction would maximize value and improve transparency and efficiency, say consultants at Charles River Associates.

  • Employment Concerns For Financial Cos. During COVID-19

    Author Photo

    Susan Eandi and Paul Evans at Baker McKenzie discuss how financial services companies can mitigate risk for certain types of COVID-19 employment lawsuits, and recent pandemic-related guidance from the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission concerning broker-dealer and investment adviser compliance.

  • Takeaways From DOJ Civil Division's Inability-To-Pay Memo

    Author Photo

    Guidance issued last week at the U.S. Department of Justice is helpful insofar as it clarifies the Civil Division's inability-to-pay process and criteria, but many open questions remain, say Matthew Miner and Amanda Robinson at Morgan Lewis.

  • Insurance Sector Should Expect More Focus From CFIUS

    Author Photo

    Given the Committee on Foreign Investment in the United States’ recent expansion of its national security reviews of inbound acquisitions and investment, and the insurance industry's intersection with several CFIUS flashpoints, it's more important than ever for insurance companies to conduct early due diligence, say attorneys at DLA Piper.

  • Bid Protest Spotlight: Conflicts, Timeliness, USPTO Rules

    Author Photo

    In this month's bid protest roundup, Locke Bell at MoFo looks at three recent Government Accountability Office decisions considering potential organizational conflicts of interest in the government’s acquisition process, the timeliness of a sole-source award protest, and the exclusion of parties as potential bidders under the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office’s unique rules.

  • What To Know When Making Dispositive Motions In Arbitration

    Author Photo

    As practitioners increasingly turn to dispositive motion practice within arbitration, they should be aware of the underlying authority for these motions and consider practical guidance for their use, says arbitrator and mediator Janice Sperow.

  • Assessing Health Data Privacy Damages During A Pandemic

    Author Photo

    Class action litigation related to data privacy in the health care industry is expected to trend upward during the COVID-19 era due to increased reliance on telehealth and contact tracing initiatives, heightening the importance of understanding the different economic approaches and challenges to valuing damages, say analysts at Cornerstone Research.

  • Twitter Hack Highlights Crypto Mixers' AML Issues

    Author Photo

    In light of a recent, high-profile Twitter breach that revealed bitcoin mixers' ability to shield licit transactions, regulators' anti-money laundering enforcement efforts may reflect increased scrutiny on trades that use these services to conceal the cryptocurrency unit's source, say economists at Bates White.

  • 4 Ways Amicus Briefs Can Support An Overall Legal Strategy

    Author Photo

    The strategic use of amicus briefs can help an appellate court think about a case in a new way and lift an organization's own cause or reputation for legal thought, say Mark Chopko and Karl Myers at Stradley Ronon.

  • Deciding Whether Co-Mediation Is Right For Your Case

    Author Photo

    Not every case requires more than one mediator, but engaging two mediators with different perspectives or expertise can significantly enhance the settlement process in certain disputes — and parties can choose from several co-mediation approaches, say Gail Andler and Cassandra Franklin at JAMS.

  • Blockchain Could Answer Contact Tracing Privacy Concerns

    Author Photo

    A contact-tracing system based on blockchain technology — currently under development in a collaboration between Apple and Google — can provide a viable solution to concerns about data security, privacy and the handling of sensitive information by leveraging decentralization, confidentiality and immutability, say advisers at FTI Consulting.

  • Roundup

    Black Law Firm Leaders On Improving Diversity In BigLaw

    Author Photo

    In this Law360 Diversity Snapshot series, five Black law firm leaders share their memories of breaking into BigLaw and thoughts on how to increase minority representation in the legal industry.

  • Opinion

    Ariz. Law Firm Ownership Rule Change Is A Win For Clients

    Author Photo

    Arizona just became the first state to abolish an obscure ethics rule that prohibits nonlawyers from investing in law firms — a change that will lower legal service costs, encourage more innovation in the legal industry and improve access to justice, says William Marra at Validity Finance.

  • How To Write A Better Comment Letter On Agency Proposals

    Author Photo

    As the federal government prepares to unveil a revamped online portal for submitting comments on proposed rulemakings, several considerations can help the public provide better feedback to help agencies implement legislation and regulate our activities, say Matt Kulkin and Josh Oppenheimer at Steptoe & Johnson.

Want to publish in Law360?


Submit an idea
Can't find the article you're looking for? Click here to search the Cybersecurity & Privacy archive.
Hello! I'm Law360's automated support bot.

How can I help you today?

For example, you can type:
  • I forgot my password
  • I took a free trial but didn't get a verification email
  • How do I sign up for a newsletter?
Beta
Ask a question!