We use cookies on this site to enable your digital experience. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our cookie policy. close

Energy

  • February 15, 2019

    The $1B Question: Can Puerto Rico Afford Its Bankruptcy Bills?

    Law firms and other professional service providers are seeking more than $300 million in bills for Puerto Rico’s unprecedented restructuring — a figure that is eventually expected to surpass $1 billion. Some local attorneys are questioning the costs. (This article is part of a series on how the island’s legal industry is rebuilding after Hurricane Maria.)

  • February 15, 2019

    Puerto Rico’s Law Firms Find Their Footing After Disaster

    Out of disaster comes opportunity. That is what the corporate legal community of Puerto Rico found after Hurricane Maria. But for many attorneys, the recovery is personal, too. (This article is part of a series on how the island’s legal industry is rebuilding after Hurricane Maria.)

  • February 15, 2019

    Texas Justices Back Exxon In Workers' Comp Recoup Row

    The Texas Supreme Court on Friday sided with ExxonMobil Corp. in its dispute with The Insurance Company of the State of Pennsylvania, holding that the insurer waived its rights to recover from Exxon workers' compensation payments the insurer made to two injured workers.

  • February 15, 2019

    Texas Oil Rig Co. Dodges Liability Verdict Over Worker's Injury

    A Texas federal judge has absolved Fieldwood Energy LLC from a jury's finding it was liable for injuries sustained by a worker who slipped on a drilling platform, saying federal law exempts the Houston-based company because the worker was a "borrowed employee" at the time he fell.

  • February 15, 2019

    3 Questions After EPA's New Water Contamination Action

    As the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency studies the possibility of regulating the levels of per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances in water, states, industry and the public are jostling for influence and preparing for potential new liability concerns in M&A and real estate transactions, as well as court fights over site cleanups.

  • February 15, 2019

    Petrobras Must Post Bond In $720M Award Row, Court Hears

    Vantage Deepwater Co. has urged a federal court to halt Petrobras from transferring the proceeds of an upcoming $562 million sale of its Texas refinery outside the U.S. until the Brazilian company puts up security for an arbitral award worth some $720 million, which the Texas driller is trying to enforce.

  • February 15, 2019

    3M, Others Rip PFAS Suit Seeking To Represent 99% Of US

    3M Co. and a group of companies told an Ohio federal court it should toss a suit filed over the potential threats posed by a group of substances called PFAS brought by a man who allegedly wants to represent a class encompassing 99 percent of the country.

  • February 15, 2019

    2 Energy Cos. Must Face $14B Suit From Del. Ch. 11 Trustee

    A Delaware bankruptcy judge refused to dismiss a Maxus Energy Corp. Chapter 11 trustee suit on Friday seeking as much as $14 billion in fraudulent transfer and alter ego liability damages against Repsol SA and Argentina-based YPF SA.

  • February 15, 2019

    TransCanada Can Do Limited Keystone Pipeline Prep Work

    A Montana federal judge on Friday said TransCanada could only perform limited pre-construction activities related to the Keystone XL pipeline while it appeals his decision halting work on the controversial project, and only in privately owned areas that aren't on the pipeline's right-of-way and have been previously surveyed and permitted.

  • February 15, 2019

    Ashurst Adds Projects Pro From Allen & Overy In Indonesia

    Ashurst has nabbed an attorney from a Jakarta, Indonesia, law firm associated with Allen & Overy LLP, bolstering its Southeast Asia offerings with his experience working on renewable energy, oil and gas, and mining infrastructure projects and advising on related litigation and arbitration proceedings.

  • February 15, 2019

    Power Co. Asks 1st Circ. To Affirm Fraud Suit Coverage Win

    Electricity Maine asked the First Circuit on Thursday to affirm that Zurich American Insurance must fund its defense of a proposed class action alleging it overbilled customers by about $35 million, saying a lower court properly found the insurer has a duty to defend because the suit contains potentially covered negligence claims.

  • February 15, 2019

    Contractor MOX Hit With Gov't FCA Suit Over False Invoices

    The federal government has hit nuclear fuel reprocessing contractor CB&I Areva MOX Services and a subcontractor with a False Claims Act suit, saying they claimed $6.4 million in reimbursements for nonexistent construction materials and engaged in a related kickback scheme.

  • February 15, 2019

    UK Litigation Roundup: Here's What You Missed In London

    The last week has seen the European arm of a Japanese investment bank sue a Saudi billionaire, the former prime minister of Qatar face action involving a pricey mansion and a Swiss bank file claims against executives of a defunct business group being investigated by the U.K.'s fraud watchdog. Here, Law360 looks at those and other new claims in the U.K.

  • February 15, 2019

    Amazon Drives Electric Truck Co.'s $700M Funding Round

    Electric vehicle manufacturer Rivian on Friday said its latest funding round brought in $700 million from a slate of investors including Amazon.com Inc., as the automaker looks to ramp up development on its recently unveiled trucks and sport utility vehicles.

  • February 15, 2019

    Greenpeace Gets Dakota Access Owner's RICO Suit Tossed

    A North Dakota federal judge has dismissed a lawsuit by Energy Transfer Partners LP against Greenpeace International, ruling that attempts to block construction of the Dakota Access Pipeline through fundraising and protest activities aren't evidence of racketeering.

  • February 15, 2019

    Great Eastern Energy Hits Ch. 11 In Del. With $61M Debt

    The parent of northeast electricity and natural gas supplier Great Eastern Energy took the business into a $61 million Chapter 11 in Delaware late Thursday after a series of defaults on agreements with creditors led by interests of Macquarie Investments.

  • February 15, 2019

    UK Energy Co. Plans Arbitration Against Egyptian Co.

    Petroceltic has announced plans to launch arbitration proceedings against Egyptian General Petroleum Corp. stemming from the state-owned company’s alleged breach of gas sales agreements and its failure to pay off debts to the U.K. energy company.

  • February 14, 2019

    Texas Energy Co. Gets $1.4B Award In Venezuela Bribe Case

    A Houston energy company that claimed it was forced out of business because it refused to bribe officials at Venezuela's state-run oil corporation convinced a Texas federal judge on Thursday to enter a $1.4 billion judgment against the former energy minister of the South American country.

  • February 14, 2019

    Ill. AG Hits Waste Co. With Oil Spill-Related Suit, Injunction

    Waste disposal and infrastructure company GFL Environmental Services USA has agreed to take steps to mitigate the harm caused earlier this month by an oil spill at one of its facilities in Illinois as the state’s attorney general filed suit against the company on Thursday alleging environmental violations.

  • February 14, 2019

    Consumer Group Says Data Back Clean Car Standards

    A consumer association told the D.C. Circuit on Thursday that the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency was hurting — not helping — consumers when it moved to reexamine an analysis that supported Obama-era vehicle greenhouse gas emission standards.

Expert Analysis

  • Opinion

    Gov't Opioid Suits Hide Attorneys' Personal Interests

    Author Photo

    Personal injury lawyers have set their sights on America’s pharmaceutical companies and opioid distributors, which they blame for a national health crisis. The cases these lawyers initiate may bear the names of states and municipalities, but are driven by law firms' pursuit of huge contingency fees, says Sherman Joyce of the American Tort Reform Association.

  • Oxbow: Alignment Is Key In Put Valuation Processes

    Author Photo

    The recent Oxbow Carbon Unitholder Litigation demonstrated many common put valuation issues, but also how an alignment mechanism can foster cooperation despite a highly adversarial relationship, say Kyle Gann and Jason Osborn of Winston & Strawn LLP.

  • How Newly Broadened Venezuela Sanctions Affect Securities

    Author Photo

    The U.S. Treasury Department’s Office of Foreign Assets Control recently amended the general licenses that authorize dealings in bonds and securities otherwise prohibited by U.S. sanctions on Venezuela — apparently to target parties that would facilitate transactions between Petróleos de Venezuela SA securities holders and blocked individuals, say attorneys at Hunton Andrews Kurth LLP.

  • Climate Change And Insurance: Increasing Foreign Lawsuits

    Author Photo

    The amount of climate-related litigation outside the United States is growing. While these cases are not all headline-grabbing actions against large emitters, they are equally important for the insurance industry to monitor, say Jason Reeves and Deepa Sutherland of Zelle LLP.

  • Better Contracts Make For More Likely Tax Savings In Ohio

    Author Photo

    In a November 2018 decision, Willoughby Hills v. Testa, the Ohio Supreme Court further defined the commercial activity tax's agency exemption. Following the ruling, taxpayers should carefully negotiate contract language and business arrangements to ensure the factors of the agency relationship are met, say Jeremy Hayden and Chris Tassone of Frost Brown Todd LLC.

  • Fresh Takes On Seeking Costs And Fees Under Rule 45

    Author Photo

    Recent case law reveals that courts vary widely in their approaches to shifting the costs and fees incurred in responding to a Federal Rule of Civil Procedure 45 subpoena. Nonparties responding to such requests should consider certain district court trends, say attorneys at Pepper Hamilton LLP.

  • Series

    Judging A Book: Smith Camp Reviews 'Echo Of Its Time'

    Author Photo

    "Echo of Its Time" is the story of Nebraska’s federal district court from statehood in 1867 to the demise of Prohibition in 1933. Professors John Wunder and Mark Scherer have written an objective, unsentimental and insightful history, layered with context and rich in character study, says U.S. District Judge Laurie Smith Camp of the District of Nebraska.

  • No Premium Recovery Guarantees For 5th Circ. Lenders

    Author Photo

    While the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit’s opinion last month directly addressed the allowability of make-whole and prepayment premiums for unsecured creditors in solvent debtor cases, its reasoning also cast doubt on the allowability of such premiums even for oversecured creditors, say attorneys at Latham & Watkins LLP.

  • Securities Class Action Filings Show No Signs Of Abating

    Author Photo

    The number of securities class action filings has remained high over the last year, and this trend is likely to continue, particularly if the markets remain volatile. But the good news for corporate America is that the number of dismissals also appears to be increasing, say attorneys at Skadden Arps Slate Meagher & Flom LLP.

  • For Texas Insurers, Liability Is Separate From Defense Costs

    Author Photo

    In Anadarko v. Houston, the Supreme Court of Texas recently ruled that policy language limiting coverage for liabilities does not apply to defense costs. This decision hinged on the court's narrow interpretation of "liability" in the context of excess insurance contracts, says Brandi Doniere of Brouse McDowell LPA.