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Energy

  • August 13, 2018

    BigLaw’s Mental Health Stigma Shows Signs Of Fading

    Sometimes viewed as an “invisible” disability, mental illness has long been forced under wraps because of the risk attorneys could face bias and stigma. Here’s how lawyers, law firms and other groups are starting to take on the status quo.

  • August 13, 2018

    SEC Hits 2 Aegis Oil Agents Over $42M In Unregistered Sales

    The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission sued two individuals Monday for allegedly selling $42 million in unregistered securities in the form of “joint venture units” in oil and gas development projects by Texas-based oil companies Aegis Oil LLC and 7S Oil & Gas LLC.

  • August 13, 2018

    Suniva Creditor Sues To Halt Removal Of Solar Cell Equipment

    The largest unsecured creditor of bankrupt solar cell maker Suniva Inc. filed an adversary complaint late Friday in Delaware seeking to prevent the debtor from having the creditor remove manufacturing equipment it recently purchased at auction from the debtor’s Norcross, Georgia, factory.

  • August 13, 2018

    Energy Cos. Win Nix Of Suit On Okla. Quake Insurance Costs

    A federal judge on Monday threw out a proposed class action asserting that a slew of oil and gas companies should be forced to pay for Oklahomans’ earthquake insurance premiums given that their use of hydraulic fracturing wastewater disposal wells has allegedly caused a rise in man-made earthquakes in the state.

  • August 13, 2018

    Dominion Seeks OK For Some Atlantic Coast Pipeline Work

    Dominion Energy Transmission Inc. on Monday said it would quickly address issues that the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission identified when it stopped construction along the length of the $5 billion Atlantic Coast gas pipeline, arguing that work on parts of the project should be allowed to resume immediately.

  • August 13, 2018

    Japanese Utilities Buy Stakes In $2.6B Innogy Wind Farm

    German energy company Innogy SE said Monday it has agreed to sell a 41 percent stake in a £2 billion ($2.6 billion) planned English wind farm to a pair of Japanese electric utilities for an undisclosed amount.

  • August 13, 2018

    Fisker Ch. 11 Trustee, Karma In Talks On Stock Sale Reset

    A liquidating trustee for bankrupt electric car maker Fisker Automotive and its Chapter 11 buyer reported plans Monday for a third round of talks on a "reset" of a capital raise by the company’s new owners that diluted the trustee's original 20 percent share and led to a Delaware lawsuit.

  • August 13, 2018

    Man Gets 8 Years In Prison For Oil And Gas Scheme

    A federal judge on Friday sentenced a man to more than eight years in prison for wire fraud and money laundering in connection with allegations that he falsely told investors he owned oil and gas leases in Montana, Texas and Oklahoma, including on the Blackfeet Indian Reservation.

  • August 13, 2018

    Enviros To Fight FERC's PennEast Pipeline Approval In Court

    Environmental groups on Monday said they plan to challenge the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission's approval of the planned $1 billion PennEast gas pipeline, claiming the agency failed to show a need for the project and didn’t consider its potential climate change impacts.

  • August 13, 2018

    Phillips 66 Refinery Hit With $475K Penalty Over Modifications

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the state of Illinois filed a proposed consent decree Friday in federal court against Phillips 66 and WRB Refining LP, requiring the companies to reduce emissions at the Wood River Refinery under the Clean Air Act, spend at least $500,000 on lead-paint abatement and pay a penalty of $475,000.

  • August 13, 2018

    Oil And Gas Co. Denied New Trials Over Workers' OT Awards

    A Pennsylvania federal judge turned down an oil and gas contractor's bid for do-overs on a pair of trials that awarded two groups of workers $1 million in back pay for overtime in addition to the sizable per-job bonuses the company already gave them.

  • August 13, 2018

    Influential Women In Energy Law: Margaret Hill

    As a kid growing up near Philadelphia, Blank Rome’s Margaret Anne Hill discovered her affinity for the law watching Perry Mason reruns. She stayed true to her childhood dream and ended up handling a flood of business from the Pennsylvania shale boom, working on massive projects like a $6 billion Shell petrochemical facility, overseeing risk analyses for a slew of mergers and acquisitions, and helping companies fend off litigation and enforcement actions — earning herself a place among Law360’s Influential Women in Energy Law.

  • August 13, 2018

    EEOC Hits DOE's Fermilab With Sex Discrimination Suit

    The U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission on Monday filed a complaint in Illinois federal court against the U.S. Department of Energy's Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory on behalf of a woman who the commission says was passed over for a promotion after complaining about sexually discriminatory treatment.

  • August 13, 2018

    Ariz. Agency Wants Quick Win In Water Rights Row

    An Arizona water district has moved for a quick win in a dispute over the district's alleged obligations to deliver excess water supply to the Ak-Chin Indian Community, urging a federal court to reject quick win bids filed by the tribe itself and the federal government.

  • August 13, 2018

    Ross Insists Turkish Metals Tariff Hike Is For Security

    Following President Donald Trump’s surprising decision to double tariffs on Turkey’s steel and aluminum exports in response to a tumbling of its currency, U.S. Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross late Friday stressed that the move was made purely for national security reasons.

  • August 10, 2018

    Influential Women In Energy Law: Chris LaFollette

    Thirty-plus years of deal-making in the historical boys' club that is the oil and gas sector — including $8 billion worth of transactions in the last 18 months alone — has helped earn Akin Gump Strauss Hauer & Feld LLP partner Chris LaFollette a spot on Law360's list of Influential Women in Energy Law.

  • August 10, 2018

    How The Legal Industry Lets Down Lawyers With Disabilities

    The dissolution of a five-year-old bar group marks the latest setback for disabled attorneys, who often find little support while navigating an inhospitable industry.

  • August 10, 2018

    10 Influential Women In Energy Law

    Law360 is proud to present a new series profiling the achievements of a select group of women in energy law, putting the spotlight on attorneys who are helping reshape an industry and practice area long perceived to be a man's world.

  • August 10, 2018

    Gaining Access: Disabled Lawyers Share Their Stories

    In a series of interviews, lawyers tell Law360 how even well-intentioned professors can create barriers, how inclusivity can help a firm’s litigation prowess, and how “inspirational” can be a dirty word.

  • August 10, 2018

    FERC's Independence Under Threat, Ex-Commissioners Say

    Former members of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission are worried the White House is compromising the agency's historic independence amid reports that a U.S. Department of Energy official who pushed a controversial plan to aid coal and nuclear power plants is President Donald Trump's pick to fill a vacant commissioner slot and that FERC is already working with the administration on the issue.

Expert Analysis

  • Congressional Forecast: July

    Layth Elhassani

    While Senate hearings on the nomination of Brett Kavanaugh to the U.S. Supreme Court will draw much attention during July, Congress remains very busy with fiscal year 2019 appropriations bills. The chambers may go to conference this month on the first of several appropriations "minibuses," says Layth Elhassani of Covington & Burling LLP.

  • What Kavanaugh's Writing Tells Us About His Personality

    Matthew Hall

    People with certain personality traits tend to use certain words. A computer analysis of Judge Brett Kavanaugh’s D.C. Circuit opinions reveals that he is highly extraverted, which means that he would be a prominent voice on the U.S. Supreme Court, says Matthew Hall, a professor at the University of Notre Dame.

  • Lorenzo V. SEC: Will High Court Further Curtail Rule 10b-5?

    Roger Cooper

    In Lorenzo v. U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission, the U.S. Supreme Court will consider whether a misstatement claim that does not meet the elements set forth in the court’s 2011 Janus decision can be repackaged and pursued as a fraudulent scheme claim under Rule 10b-5. A number of possible outcomes present themselves, say attorneys with Cleary Gottlieb Steen & Hamilton LLP.

  • Opinion

    3 Pros, 3 Cons Of Litigation Finance

    Ralph Sutton

    An educated guess puts the number of new litigation funders launched in the past 18 months at 30 — an astonishing number, with more to come. Is this a blessing to our legal system or something more akin to tulip mania? Maybe both, says Ralph Sutton, founder and CEO of litigation funding firm Validity Finance LLC.

  • Modern Communication Brings E-Discovery Challenges

    Thomas Bonk

    As new communications platforms displace email, the legal industry is awkwardly grappling with complex e-discovery questions. Fortunately, this environment provides a very fertile ground of incentives for innovation in both e-discovery technology and service offerings, says Thomas Bonk of Epiq.

  • Opinion

    DOJ Should Encourage The Bid-Rigging Whistleblower

    Robert Connolly

    There are relatively few government contract collusion whistleblowers. The U.S. Department of Justice's Antitrust Division could roll out the whistleblower welcome mat by making a few changes that will not cost the government a nickel. Even if only one new case emerges, the efforts would be worth it, says former federal prosecutor Robert Connolly.

  • Opinion

    It's Not All About The Benjamins, Baby (Lawyer)

    J.B. Heaton

    Notwithstanding the latest salary war among prominent law firms, I urge my middle-aged and older colleagues to help the recent graduates we know focus on the long term. Even if the salary is the same, there is a big difference between an institutional firm and the relatively younger firms matching BigLaw, says J.B. Heaton, a University of Chicago business law fellow and former partner at Bartlit Beck.

  • Investment Tax Credit Guidance Means Sunny Days For Solar

    Jon Nelsen

    Notice 2018-59, issued last month by the Internal Revenue Service, confirms that standards and safe harbors previously defined for wind energy projects can be used with solar energy projects. Project sponsors can now act with greater certainty in making solar investments, say Jon Nelsen, Michael Didriksen and Peter Farrell of Baker Botts LLP.

  • Series

    Judging A Book: Hood Reviews 'Lawyering From The Inside Out'

    Judge Denise Hood

    Law professor Nathalie Martin's new book, "Lawyering From the Inside Out: Learning Professional Development Through Mindfulness and Emotional Intelligence," can be of value to any lawyer aiming to achieve greater productivity, relieve the stress of the legal profession and focus on goals, says U.S. District Chief Judge Denise Page Hood of the Eastern District of Michigan.

  • A Path To New York's Energy Storage Goal

    Danielle Mettler-LaFeir

    New York state's recently issued Energy Storage Roadmap identifies the actions and initiatives that can help New York meet its energy storage goal of 1,500 megawatts by 2025. Danielle Mettler-LaFeir of Barclay Damon LLP looks at the road map’s recommendations and the opportunities they create.