Energy

  • September 18, 2019

    9th Circ. Will Take On FERC-Bankruptcy Court Tussle

    The Ninth Circuit on Tuesday said it will directly review a California bankruptcy judge's ruling that the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission has no say over whether Pacific Gas and Electric Co. can ditch power purchase agreements in Chapter 11 and put the case on the fast track.

  • September 17, 2019

    Brown Rudnick Energy Head Tapped As API's Top Lawyer

    The American Petroleum Institute tapped the co-head of Brown Rudnick LLP's energy and environmental practice, who's also a veteran regulator and lobbyist, to serve as the petroleum industry group's top lawyer.

  • September 17, 2019

    Calif. Utility Beats Suit Over Pedestrian's Death

    A California appeals court on Monday affirmed the dismissal of a suit accusing Southern California Edison Co. of being responsible for inadequate lighting on a city street, purportedly causing a driver to strike and kill a woman, saying her children lodged an untimely appeal.

  • September 17, 2019

    EPA Set To Rescind Calif. Emissions Waiver Amid Auto Fight

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Andrew Wheeler told a group of auto dealers on Tuesday that the federal government will "very soon" rescind California's right to use its own standards for vehicle emissions.

  • September 17, 2019

    Oil & Gas Producer’s $15M DIP OK'd Amid Creditor Outcry

    A Delaware bankruptcy judge on Tuesday gave her nod to oil and gas producer Furie Operating Alaska LLC’s $15 million post-petition Chapter 11 financing while continuing to acknowledge that like some of Furie’s creditors, she had concerns about aspects of the financing.

  • September 17, 2019

    Former Energy Exec Created Fake CFO, SEC Says  

    The former head of a Texas energy company falsely listed a Chinese businesswoman as the chief financial officer of his company and then duped investors by signing documents with her name for nearly two years, the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission said Tuesday.

  • September 17, 2019

    Duke Energy Sets Goal Of Net Zero Electric Emissions By '50

    Duke Energy Corp., which holds coal, gas, nuclear and green energy assets, said Tuesday that it will aim for net zero carbon emissions from its electricity generation by 2050.

  • September 17, 2019

    FordHarrison Litigator Returns After Marathon Petroleum Stint

    FordHarrison LLP has added back to its ranks in Dallas a seasoned litigator with expertise in representing petroleum refiners in labor and employment disputes, announcing he has returned from Marathon Petroleum Co.

  • September 17, 2019

    ConocoPhillips Wants Heirs' $11.7M Mineral Win Undone

    ConocoPhillips took aim at a finding that it owes $11.7 million to two Texans, telling the Texas Supreme Court in oral argument Tuesday that the will purporting to convey mineral rights is unclear and not binding.

  • September 17, 2019

    CFTC Alleges Man Made $10M In Binary Options Fraud

    The U.S. Commodity Futures Trading Commission on Tuesday filed suit against a man it claims fraudulently took at least $10 million in a binary options trading scheme on commodities and foreign currencies.

  • September 17, 2019

    Out-Of-State Developer Insists Texas Grid Project Law Invalid

    Texas can't argue away the fact that legislation which dictates only incumbent transmission companies can build new power lines that connect to their existing systems is an unlawful protectionist scheme, an out-of-state transmission developer told a federal judge Monday.

  • September 17, 2019

    NC Slams FERC’s Enviro Analysis Of $468M Gas Pipeline

    North Carolina regulators told the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission on Monday that a planned $468 million extension of the Mountain Valley natural gas pipeline ignored clean-energy alternatives for the project and sidestepped key climate change questions.

  • September 17, 2019

    PE Firm Sues For $4M After Early Fla. Energy Deal Exit

    ACON Equity Management LLC told a London judge Tuesday that an investment vehicle it used to buy a Florida energy company cannot avoid paying it $4 million after the U.S. private equity firm sold its stake in the company.

  • September 17, 2019

    EU Clears German Energy Cos.' Asset Swap, With Conditions

    Europe's antitrust authority gave the green light Tuesday to German energy company E.ON’s multibillion-dollar pickup of a majority stake in rival Innogy after finding that the buyer's concessions assuaged its concerns.

  • September 17, 2019

    States, Enviros Push Calif. Judge To Enforce EPA Landfill Rule

    States and environmentalists on Monday urged a California federal judge to stick to his guns and force the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to implement Obama-era landfill air pollution regulations despite the agency's claim that the judge's order is now irrelevant.

  • September 17, 2019

    DC Circ. Tosses Clean Power Plan Challenges

    The D.C. Circuit on Tuesday tossed legal challenges to the Obama administration's signature climate change plan, accepting the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's argument that because it has replaced the regulations, the litigation is moot.

  • September 17, 2019

    Tribe, Enviros Urge 9th Circ. To Undo BLM Mining Permit Win

    An Alaskan Indian village and conservation groups have told the Ninth Circuit that the Bureau of Land Management violated federal environmental laws when it refused to look at the impact a potential mine would have before greenlighting preliminary exploration activities.

  • September 16, 2019

    Bankrupt PG&E Trial With Elderly Fire Victims Gets 2020 Start

    A San Francisco jury must determine whether Pacific Gas and Electric Co.'s equipment sparked the 2017 Tubbs Fire and any additional damages, said a California judge Monday tasked with moving elderly victims' lawsuits along at breakneck speed to meet a June 30 deadline for PG&E to emerge from bankruptcy.

  • September 16, 2019

    6 Texas Supreme Court Oil And Gas Cases To Watch

    A $535 million fight over what constitutes a pipeline partnership headlines a stack of high-stakes oil and gas industry cases that the Texas Supreme Court is poised to consider as it starts a new term. Here are six oil and gas cases worth watching in the Lone Star State's highest court.

  • September 16, 2019

    Chemical Co. Wins $5.7M Verdict For Construction Defects

    Georgia engineering firm Weatherly Inc. should pay $5.75 million to cover the cost of fixing an ammonium nitrate plant's faulty piping and cracked foundations that resulted from Weatherly's flawed designs, a federal jury ruled Monday.

  • September 16, 2019

    Class Atty Accused Of Fraudulent Billing In Gas Royalties Suit

    A group of dissident landowners in a class action accusing Range Resources Corp. of stiffing them on natural gas royalties asked a Pennsylvania federal judge on Friday to have class counsel booted from the case over allegations that he submitted fraudulent billing records as part of a fee request.

  • September 16, 2019

    DC Circ. Won't Rethink Ukraine Immunity In $112M Award Suit

    The D.C. Circuit on Monday rejected Ukraine's bid to reconsider its decision nixing the country's sovereign immunity defense in litigation to enforce a $112 million arbitral award, despite arguments that the court's decision contradicted decades of precedent.

  • September 16, 2019

    Drill Rig Co.'s $16M Ch. 11 Sale OK'd Over Creditor Objections

    A Delaware bankruptcy judge on Monday gave a nod to the $16.3 million sale of bankrupt drilling rig maker Schramm Inc. despite strong opposition from unsecured creditors who said the sale was an insider deal set up to benefit a company lender and equityholder while leaving them empty-handed.

  • September 16, 2019

    Arco Wants Jury Trial Over NM Uranium Mine Cleanup

    Following failed settlement talks, oil company Arco has notified a federal court it wants a jury trial over cleanup liability for a Superfund site on tribal land, a former uranium mine that Arco departed in the mid-1980s with a cleanup payment of $43 million.

  • September 16, 2019

    DC Circ. Asks If 4th Circ. Ruling Kills $7B Pipeline Fight

    The D.C. Circuit has said it wants to know why it should still consider challenges to the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission's approval of the $7 billion Atlantic Coast gas pipeline now that the Fourth Circuit has invalidated the U.S. Forest Service's authorization for the controversial project.

Expert Analysis

  • Maximizing Insurance Recovery For Energy Companies

    Author Photo

    Two recent cases from Texas showcase some of the unique insurance challenges faced by the energy industry. Oil and gas companies must carefully craft their insurance programs to account for economic, political and societal pressures, say Robin Cohen and Lauren Varnado of McKool Smith.

  • Q&A

    A Chat With Cleary Chief Talent Officer Hy Pomerance

    Author Photo

    In this monthly series, legal recruiting experts from Major Lindsey & Africa interview management from top law firms about the increasingly competitive business environment. Here, Amanda Brady and Dustin Laws talk with Hy Pomerance, chief talent officer of Cleary.

  • Rebuttal

    Forced Arbitration Is A Far Worse 'Product' Than Jury Trials

    Author Photo

    Jury trials are not dying because arbitration is a “better product,” as alleged in a recent Law360 guest article, but because corporations have rigged the system through forced arbitration to ensure they cannot be held accountable before a judge or jury, say attorneys at Hagens Berman.

  • Guest Feature

    Preet Bharara On The Human Factor In The Justice System

    Author Photo

    A key theme in Preet Bharara's new book is the enormous role the human element plays in the administration of justice. The former U.S. attorney for the Southern District of New York discussed this theme, among other topics, in a recent conversation with White and Williams attorney Randy Maniloff.

  • What We Heard At The FTC Hearings: Day 22

    Author Photo

    The 13th hearing in the Federal Trade Commission’s series on competition in the 21st century focused on evaluating the FTC’s merger retrospective program. Jon B. Jacobs and Jeremy Keeney of Perkins Coie discuss some of the recurring themes, innovative concepts and key takeaways.

  • Rebuttal

    Jury Trials, Though In Decline, Are Well Worth Preserving

    Author Photo

    In a recent Law360 guest article, the author applauded the disappearance of jury trials as an inefficient, costly mechanism, but in doing so he overlooked the greater value of jury trials for our justice system, says Stephen Susman, executive director of the Civil Jury Project at NYU School of Law.

  • A Broader View Of The US Supreme Court Bar

    Author Photo

    During the past 15 years, three widely read articles bolstered by starstruck media have promulgated the incorrect perception — sorely in need of revision — that the U.S. Supreme Court bar is limited to a handful of elite lawyers, says Lawrence Ebner of Capital Appellate Advocacy.

  • How Treaties Protect Investors When Clean Energy Regs Shift

    Author Photo

    When changes in clean energy regulations lead to investor disputes, domestic companies may be limited to challenging regulatory changes in local courts, but investors from abroad can often seek remedies under international law, say attorneys at WilmerHale.

  • In Virtual Teams For Mass Torts, The 'Law Team' Is Critical

    Author Photo

    A critical component of any virtual law team assembled for mass tort litigation is a dedicated "law team," which tackles the legal strategy and drafts the many necessary pleadings, motions and other submissions, say attorneys at Pepper Hamilton and FaegreBD.

  • Opinion

    Jury Trials Are In Decline For Good Reason

    Author Photo

    A recent Law360 article reported on federal judges bemoaning jury trials' nationwide decline, but these laments are unfounded as jury trials have been replaced by better alternatives, says J.B. Heaton of J.B. Heaton Research.

  • The PTAB's New, Narrow Avenue For Filing Late IPR

    Author Photo

    The Patent Trial and Appeal Board's decision in Proppant Express v. Oren provides one example of permissible self-joinder for inter partes review petitioners after the one-year bar. Though limited, the ruling may apply to several other circumstances, say Stephen Zinda and James Hall of Blank Rome.

  • Series

    Why I Became A Lawyer: A Circuitous Path To The Law

    Author Photo

    Instead of going to college after high school, I followed in my father’s footsteps and became an electrician. Later I became an electrical engineer, and then an IP attorney. Every twist and turn along the way has made me a better lawyer, says Joseph Maraia of Burns & Levinson.

  • Fee Award Highlights Patent Litigation In Claims Court

    Author Photo

    The recent U.S. Court of Federal Claims decision awarding Hitkansut more than $4 million in attorney fees explains the different fee standard for patent cases against the government, and may lead to increased interest in these types of cases, say Matthew Rizzolo and Steve Meil of Ropes & Gray.

  • Series

    Judging A Book: Conrad Reviews 'The Jury Crisis'

    Author Photo

    In "The Jury Crisis," jury consultant and social psychologist Drury Sherrod spotlights the vanishing jury trial, providing a fascinating canary-in-the-coal-mine warning for lawyers, litigants and society at large, says U.S. District Judge Robert Conrad of the Western District of North Carolina.

  • Revamping Your Approach To Client Development

    Author Photo

    As a former general counsel for both public and private companies, my advice to law firm attorneys who want to attract and keep clients is simple — provide certain legal services for free, says Noel Elfant, founder of General Counsel Practice.

Can't find the article you're looking for? Click here to search the Energy archive.