Energy

  • September 09, 2019

    San Francisco Makes $2.5B Offer For PG&E Power Lines

    The city of San Francisco has made a $2.5 billion offer to buy bankrupt utility Pacific Gas and Electric’s power lines serving the city.

  • September 06, 2019

    Law360 Names Top Attorneys Under 40

    We're pleased to announce Law360's Rising Stars for 2019, our list of 175 attorneys under 40 whose legal accomplishments transcend their age.

  • September 06, 2019

    Kazakhstan Takes $506M Award Fight To High Court

    Kazakhstan has urged the U.S. Supreme Court to nix a ruling confirming a $506 million arbitration award issued to two Moldovan oil and gas investors, arguing the underlying decision "threatens the integrity and international reputation of this country’s judiciary."

  • September 06, 2019

    Vectren Slips Shareholder Suit Over $6B CenterPoint Merger

    An Indiana federal judge said Friday that a group of Vectren Corp. shareholders failed to show that the energy holding company omitted crucial information from the proxy statement for its $6 billion merger with CenterPoint Energy.

  • September 06, 2019

    Bankrupt Oil Co. Creditor Sues In Chancery Over 2016 Sale

    A former noteholder of bankrupt Triangle Petroleum Corp. on Friday sued three company directors and others involved in the $58 million sale of an oilfield services affiliate in 2016, seeking damages in Delaware's Chancery Court based on the affiliate's quick, allegedly conflicted resale for $284 million.

  • September 06, 2019

    Trump, DOJ Turn Up Heat On Calif. Car Emissions Deal

    The Trump administration is escalating its vehicle emissions war with California, warning the Golden State on Friday that its recent agreement with automakers to tighten standards beyond what's federally required is unlawful. Meanwhile, the U.S. Department of Justice has reportedly launched an antitrust investigation of the automakers that made the deal.

  • September 06, 2019

    DC Circ. Skeptical Of Challenge To GHG Standards Rollback

    A three-judge panel of the D.C. Circuit appeared skeptical Friday about the timing of a lawsuit seeking to overturn the Trump administration's plan to roll back vehicle greenhouse gas emission standards, saying the rule is not final and the government could change course.

  • September 06, 2019

    Commerce Can't Impose Tariffs That Predate Notice, CIT Says

    The federal government may not retroactively impose a triple-digit tariff on Sumec North America's Chinese solar cell shipments before the government had notified the public of the higher rate, the U.S. Court of International Trade found Friday.

  • September 06, 2019

    Range Resources Can't Slip Suit Over Gas Royalty Deductions

    A Pennsylvania federal judge on Friday refused to throw out a lawsuit accusing a Range Resources Corp. unit of failing to properly cap deductions it subtracted from royalty checks to landowners to cover post-production costs for natural gas extracted from beneath their property.

  • September 06, 2019

    Schramm Creditor Says Ch. 11 Sale Is An Insider Deal

    An unsecured creditor of drilling rig maker Schramm Inc. objected Friday to the company's proposed Chapter 11 sale, saying the deal is a thinly veiled attempt by the debtor's primary equity holder to maintain its ownership of Schramm.

  • September 06, 2019

    Vt. High Court Tells Agency To Redo Solar Project Review

    The Vermont Supreme Court on Friday ordered the state Public Utility Commission to review again a solar generation project opposed by neighbors of the proposed facility, but said the project isn't necessarily doomed.

  • September 06, 2019

    Baker Hughes Tells 5th Circ. $52M Contribution Is Deductible

    Baker Hughes’ $52 million cash contribution to its Russian subsidiary to prevent liquidation by the Russian government was a necessary expense that should be tax-deductible, the company told the Fifth Circuit during oral arguments.

  • September 06, 2019

    Bill To Help PG&E Pay Wildfire Claims Shelved In Calif.

    A California legislative bill that would have let bankrupt Pacific Gas & Electric pay the damages from wildfires blamed on its equipment with state-issued bonds has been shelved until next year. 

  • September 06, 2019

    Lone Star Laterals: Skadden, Haynes and Boone, Locke Lord

    Major law firms in Texas added experienced partners in recent weeks, including Skadden Arps Slate Meagher & Flom's hire of a business litigator, Haynes and Boone bringing on a returning real estate partner, and Locke Lord nabbing the new mayor of Dallas.

  • September 06, 2019

    Shell Appoints New GC After Ex-GC Moves To Nestle

    Royal Dutch Shell PLC has appointed a new group chief ethics and compliance officer and general counsel of compliance after the group's former GC moved to Nestle SA to serve as the candy company's new executive vice president and general counsel.

  • September 06, 2019

    DC Circ. To FERC: Tell How Gas Exports Justify Nexus Line

    The D.C. Circuit on Friday told the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission to go back and try again to explain how gas for foreign export from the Nexus Gas Transmission LLC’s $2.1 billion pipeline could be used to justify the project's need and the taking of private property.

  • September 06, 2019

    Taxation With Representation: Debevoise, Wachtell, Gibson

    In this week’s Taxation With Representation, Prudential snaps up an insurance startup for $2.35 billion, Silverlake invests $1 billion in Motorola, and Concho Resources makes a $925 million drilling properties sale.

  • September 06, 2019

    White & Case Needn't Turn Over Docs To Ex-Yukos Investors

    White & Case LLP won't have to turn over documents to former Yukos Oil Co. investors who are asking a Dutch court to revive $50 billion in arbitral awards against Russia, a New York federal judge ruled on Thursday, agreeing with a magistrate judge that the former shareholders had filed their petition too late.

  • September 06, 2019

    DC Circ. Upholds EPA's 2018 Renewable Fuel Standards

    The D.C. Circuit on Friday upheld the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's 2018 Renewable Fuel Standard rule, which set the amounts of renewable fuel that must be incorporated into the U.S. fuel supply.

  • September 05, 2019

    Treasury Blacklists Shipping Network For Supporting Iran

    The Trump administration slapped sanctions on a massive Iranian petroleum shipping network for supporting Iran's Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps and Hezbollah, according to an announcement from the U.S. Department of the Treasury.

  • September 05, 2019

    Enviros Seek Halt To Fracking In NM's Mancos Shale

    Several environmental groups pressed a New Mexico federal court to block fracking for oil and gas wells in the Mancos Shale, saying that the Bureau of Land Management hasn’t changed its environmental analysis for the region despite a Tenth Circuit ruling against the agency.

  • September 05, 2019

    Power Co. Says Texas PUC Must Review Electrocution Suit

    CenterPoint Energy has asked the Texas Supreme Court to dismiss tort claims blaming improperly designed power lines for a driver’s electrocution death, arguing that the state Public Utility Commission must handle the claims before they can be heard in court.

  • September 05, 2019

    2nd Circ. Revives Objector's Fee Fight In $3B Petrobras Deal

    A man who saved a class of investors $46 million in legal fees stemming from their $3 billion settlement with Brazil's state-run oil giant Petrobras will get another opportunity to secure more than $11,732 for his efforts, the Second Circuit ruled Thursday.

  • September 05, 2019

    Wis. Tribe Asks 7th Circ. To Revive Suit Over Mine Project

    A Seventh Circuit judge Thursday appeared skeptical of the federal government's argument that letters it sent to a Wisconsin tribe affirming the state of Michigan's authority to issue a permit for a proposed mine don't constitute a final agency action a federal court can review.

  • September 05, 2019

    Deals Rumor Mill: WeWork, ExxonMobil, Palantir

    The parent company of the workspace sharing company WeWork is reportedly considering slashing its valuation, ExxonMobil has inked an up to $4 billion deal to sell its Norwegian oil and gas assets, and Palantir Technologies is in talks to nab private funding that could delay its plans to go public.

Expert Analysis

  • A Litigator’s Reflections From The Arbitrator’s Chair

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    The U.S. Supreme Court's opinions this term in Henry Schein and Lamps Plus remind us of the fundamental difference between arbitration and litigation. Yet, as a commercial litigator who serves as a neutral arbitrator, I have observed that experienced litigators often fail to adapt their approach in arbitration, says Paula Litt at Honigman.

  • 5 Hard Phrases Lawyers Should Master

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    While Kelly Corrigan's popular book, "Tell Me More: Stories About the 12 Hardest Things I’m Learning to Say," focuses on simple words or phrases that individuals can use to improve their personal lives, attorneys can utilize Corrigan's advice for professional benefit, says Karen Ross of Tucker Ellis.

  • A Plan To Meet New York's Expanded Energy Storage Goals

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    To reach its recently established goal of 3 gigawatts of energy storage capacity by 2030, New York state must continue financial incentives for energy storage development, increase utilities' energy storage requirements and set up a framework for accurate valuation of energy storage resources, say Danielle Mettler-LaFeir and Ekin Senlet of Barclay Damon.

  • E-Discovery Experts Could Increase Fed. Court Efficiency

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    As electronic data demands on federal courts continue to increase, it may be time to consider whether the courts should establish an office that could be staffed with technical experts familiar with electronic discovery issues, says Douglas Smith of Kirkland.

  • Fed. Circ. Limits Gov't Contractors' Litigation Cost Claims

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    The Federal Circuit's July 16 decision in Bechtel National v. United States upholds the precedent set in Geren v. Tecom, making it harder for contractors to argue government agencies indicated their willingness to reimburse them for third-party litigation expenses through contract terms, say attorneys at Arnold & Porter.

  • Recent IRS Notices Blow Favorable For Wind Projects

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    Two recent IRS notices, adjusting the value of production tax credits and creating a safe harbor for certain U.S. Department of Defense-caused project delays, provide a small breath of fresh air for the onshore wind industry, says David Burton at Norton Rose.

  • Remembering Justice Stevens As A Law Firm Leader

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    Rothschild Barry's John Coffey, who joined Justice John Paul Stevens' law firm in 1965, shares what it was like to watch Justice Stevens practice law, mentor younger lawyers and land a malfunctioning plane.

  • Keeping Conventional Power Going Until Renewables Mature

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    The U.S. Department of Energy, the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission and state regulators have a handful of tools to compel generators to delay the retirement of nuclear, coal and gas plants until greener options are more reliable, but their scope has not yet been tested in court, says Gordon Coffee at Winston & Strawn.

  • The Latest Executive Order On Buying American Has Teeth

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    Earlier executive orders aimed at strengthening compliance with the Buy American Act were essentially position statements. Monday’s executive order differs, however, because it proposes a textual change to the Federal Acquisition Regulation, one that would have wide-ranging, potentially disruptive effects on government contractors, say attorneys at Covington.

  • The Nondelegation Doctrine And Enviro Regs, Post-Gundy

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    The U.S. Supreme Court’s recent decision in Gundy v. United States may have opened the door to a revitalization of the long-dormant nondelegation doctrine. Such a shift could make it difficult for a future administration to deal with climate change without congressional action, say William McGrath and Jeffrey Jay of Brownstein Hyatt.

  • Community Solar Needs Clear, Flexible State Regulations

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    As states adopt and expand third-party solar development programs, regulators should streamline rules and avoid prescriptive requirements for developers, say Elliot Hinds and Diana Jeschke at Crowell & Moring.

  • How Carbon Capture Tax Credit Financing Would Work

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    Legislation recently introduced in the Senate would create a new tax-exempt financing option for carbon dioxide generating facilities that spend capital developing green countermeasures for carbon capture and sequestration, says Taylor Klavan of Squire Patton.

  • Answers To Key Legal Finance Ethics Questions

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    While there is discussion in some quarters about new regulations on commercial legal finance, the hands-off approach taken by the majority of courts and legislatures is an implicit recognition that it is already sufficiently regulated, says Danielle Cutrona of Burford Capital.

  • Federal Agencies Need A Uniform Record-Keeping Process

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    The administrative record is very important to federal agency litigation — as showcased in last month's U.S. Supreme Court decision concerning the addition of a citizenship question to the 2020 census — yet there is no set of consistent principles to guide agencies in compiling these official records, say attorneys at WilmerHale.

  • The Role Of Dictionaries In Last Term's High Court Decisions

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    Since 32 of the 67 decisions issued by the U.S. Supreme Court during its October term cite dictionaries, it’s worth reviewing the opinions to learn which dictionaries the justices consulted and how they used them, say Bruce Wessel and Brian Weissenberg of Irell & Manella.

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