We use cookies on this site to enable your digital experience. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our cookie policy. close

Environmental

  • May 24, 2019

    Calif. Judge Partially Blocks Trump’s Border Wall

    A California federal judge on Friday partially blocked the federal government from repurposing defense funds to build a wall along portions of the southern border and criticized the Trump administration for its attempts to move money to the the project even though Congress repeatedly denied funding requests.

  • May 24, 2019

    Renewable Energy Co. Execs Settle Investor Suit For $2M

    The top executives of the since-liquidated renewable energy company Rentech Inc. have agreed to settle investors’ claims that they made the highly leveraged company appear stable when it was actually facing default.

  • May 24, 2019

    Ill. Appellate Court Revives Chicago Lead Pipe Suit

    An Illinois appellate court panel revived a class action brought by Chicago residents claiming the city failed to warn them of lead exposure in their drinking water and exacerbated the problem when it attempted to replace water mains, in a split decision that one judge said could prompt a flood of lawsuits seeking medical monitoring damages.

  • May 24, 2019

    Enviros, Tribe Says Alaska Drilling Approval Not Thought Out

    Environmental groups and an Alaska tribe told a federal court the U.S. Bureau of Land Management ignored threats to caribou and the impact on native populations of increased oil and gas exploration in the National Petroleum Reserve-Alaska, arguing the government's shoddy environmental analysis needs to be redone.

  • May 24, 2019

    Gibbons Enviro Atty Returns To Giordano Halleran In NJ

    Giordano Halleran & Ciesla PC has welcomed back an environmental attorney as a shareholder at its Red Bank, New Jersey, headquarters, where he previously practiced before moving on to stints at Gibbons PC and as senior counsel for Gov. Phil Murphy.

  • May 24, 2019

    Porsche Wants Out Of VW Emissions RICO Suit

    Porsche AG said it's being unfairly lumped in with other manufacturers in the Volkswagen family that were sued by car dealers over the diesel emissions scandal, insisting it's just a victim of “guilt by association,” the company argued in a motion to dismiss the suit.

  • May 24, 2019

    Mo. Farmers’ Pipeline Fight Moved To Federal Court

    Missouri federal court is the new home for a lawsuit brought by eight groups of property owners who claim a pipeline company and construction firm damaged their farmland and took more property for a construction project than initially allowed.

  • May 24, 2019

    Ex-NY Water Official Pleads Guilty In Sewage Discharge Case

    A former superintendent of a New York wastewater treatment plant pled guilty to violating the Clean Water Act after federal authorities accused him of letting wastewater contaminated with solid sewage flow into Lake Ontario.

  • May 24, 2019

    Pipeline Permit Denial Puts NY In Uncharted Legal Waters

    New York state's demand that a Williams Cos. unit evaluate and mitigate climate change impacts in order to secure a water quality permit for a $926 million gas pipeline could test the boundaries of states' authority under the Clean Water Act and inflame tensions with a Trump administration bent on curbing it.

  • May 24, 2019

    Tribes Keep Narrow Winning Edge In Justices' Treaty Ruling

    The U.S. Supreme Court's 5-4 decision this week that the Crow Tribe's right to hunt wasn't eclipsed by Wyoming's statehood showed tribes have a tight but seemingly firm path to victory on treaty rights, as the high court finally put to bed a ruling that had long bedeviled the Crow.

  • May 23, 2019

    'Roundup Cocktail' Argument A Potent Threat After $2B Award

    Glyphosate may be the marquee ingredient in Roundup weedkiller, but last week's $2 billion verdict against manufacturer Monsanto shows the success of the argument that Roundup is a chemical cocktail and that its less famous ingredients drastically increase the risk that emerges from the whole. That could spell trouble for Monsanto in future trials.

  • May 23, 2019

    House Says Constitution Doesn't Bar Border Wall Funding Suit

    To block the Trump administration from spending more funds on a border wall than Congress appropriated, House Democrats will need to convince a D.C. federal judge that the branches of government are allowed to sue each other.

  • May 23, 2019

    Dems Want Probe Into Mineral Lease Work In Monument Area

    Two Democratic lawmakers have urged the U.S. Government Accountability Office to look into whether the Trump administration is flouting federal restrictions by working to set the stage for energy development in the Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument area.

  • May 23, 2019

    Fishers Say US Improperly Barred Them From Tuna Study

    A tuna fishing group told a D.C. federal court the federal government improperly prohibited it from participating in a scientific study that could impact future regulations, a decision that could also affect other industries such as oil and gas.

  • May 23, 2019

    Enviros Say FWS Protection Delays Putting 8 Species At Risk

    Environmental groups filed suit against officials at the U.S. Department of the Interior on Thursday, accusing them of violating the Endangered Species Act by blowing past deadlines to act on eight species the government has already said deserve protection.

  • May 23, 2019

    Donziger Held In Contempt In $9.5B Chevron Ecuador Fight

    A New York federal court on Thursday imposed sanctions on suspended attorney Steven Donziger, who helped secure a fraudulent $9.5 billion judgment against Chevron Corp. in Ecuador, saying Donziger had blatantly ignored the court's orders forbidding him from profiting from the award.

  • May 23, 2019

    Enviros Say EPA Must Rethink Startup Emissions Standard

    Green groups told the D.C. Circuit the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency was wrong to have concluded it can't set emissions standards for power plants during startup periods under its mercury emissions rule.

  • May 23, 2019

    NY Tribe Members Say High Court Backs Their Fishing Rights

    Three members of the Shinnecock Indian Nation who accuse New York state and Suffolk County of illegally prosecuting them for fishing near the tribe's Long Island reservation have urged a New York federal court to consider a recent U.S. Supreme Court decision they say supports their claims.

  • May 23, 2019

    Sierra Club Sues DOI Again Over Industry Communications

    The Sierra Club sued the U.S. Department of the Interior on Wednesday to force it to turn over emails, texts and other communications between Interior Secretary David Bernhardt and oil and gas industry representatives that the group claims have had improper influence on top agency officials.

  • May 23, 2019

    Germany Fines Bosch €90M Over Emissions Scandal

    German prosecutors on Thursday said they have imposed a €90 million ($100.6 million) fine against automotive supplier Robert Bosch GmbH for breaching supervision duties in connection with the diesel emissions cheating scandal.

  • May 22, 2019

    Kenneth Feinberg Tapped To Mediate Monsanto Roundup MDL

    A California federal judge Wednesday appointed former Sept. 11th Victim Compensation Fund special master Kenneth Feinberg to help mediate a deal in multidistrict litigation involving 1,300 suits alleging Monsanto's Roundup causes cancer and tentatively set Feb. 10 for the start of the second trial in the federal MDL.

  • May 22, 2019

    Split Texas Panel Gives OK To TCEQ Injection Well Approval

    A split Texas appeals court on Wednesday upheld a state environmental regulator’s approval of an industrial waste disposal facility despite concerns raised late in the process by Texas energy regulators about the project's impact on nearby oil and gas deposits.

  • May 22, 2019

    CIT Affirms Lower Duties For Taiwan Solar Panels

    The U.S. Court of International Trade on Wednesday upheld the U.S. Department of Commerce’s decision to lower tariffs for producers of solar panels from Taiwan after the department was asked to take another look at whether the products were sold at unfairly low prices.

  • May 22, 2019

    Pa. Residents Displaced By CSX Derailment Seek Class Cert.

    Residents of a western Pennsylvania borough who were displaced for days by a fiery CSX Transportation Inc. derailment asked a federal judge for class certification Wednesday in their lawsuit alleging that the railroad was negligent in allowing the train to come off the tracks as it rolled through the town.

  • May 22, 2019

    Power Plant Pollution Changes On Horizon, EPA Says

    The Trump administration on Wednesday said it will continue its deregulatory push over the next few months with rules on tap intended to make it easier on power plants and other big air pollution emitters to avoid having to obtain certain permits.

Expert Analysis

  • Real-Life Lessons For Lawyers From 'Game Of Thrones'

    Author Photo

    What lessons can the various hands, maesters, council members and other advisers in "Game of Thrones" impart to real-life lawyers? Quite a few, if we assume that the Model Rules of Professional Conduct were adopted by the Seven Kingdoms, says Edward Reich of Dentons.

  • California Is Filling The Gaps In The Clean Water Act

    Author Photo

    As the Trump administration takes steps to shrink the scope of federal Clean Water Act jurisdiction, California has issued regulations establishing stricter oversight of discharges to waters in the state. Members of the regulated community must understand the state's expansive new definitions of "waters" and "wetlands," says Joshua Bloom of Environmental General Counsel.

  • 5 Tips To Help Your Summer Associates Succeed

    Author Photo

    There are a number of ways that attorneys can ensure their summer associates successfully manage critical writing assignments and new types of professional interactions, says Julie Schrager of Schiff Hardin.

  • Challenges To Trump's '2 For 1' Order Face Difficult Road

    Author Photo

    Shortly after President Donald Trump took office, he issued an executive order directing agencies to eliminate two existing regulations for every new regulation adopted. Multiple lawsuits challenging this order are ongoing, but federal courts are poorly equipped to adjudicate claims that involve an agency’s failure to regulate, says Steven Gordon of Holland & Knight.

  • Keys To Communicating A Law Firm's Mission

    Author Photo

    Today’s law firm leaders are pretty good at developing a strategic vision for the enterprise, but there is often a disconnect between that road map and the marketing department’s rank and file, leading to a deliverable that does little to differentiate the firm, says José Cunningham, a legal industry consultant.

  • High Court Remains Supportive Of Tribal Treaty Rights

    Author Photo

    The U.S. Supreme Court's decision Monday in Herrera v. Wyoming demonstrates the continuing vitality of Indian treaties and may ignite other tribes' efforts to define the scope of their treaty-reserved hunting and gathering rights outside of their reservations, says Rob Roy Smith of Kilpatrick Townsend.

  • Federal Agencies Dig In For Prolonged PFAS Fight

    Author Photo

    The remarkably public fight between the U.S. Department of Defense and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and Congress over allowable levels of per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances in groundwater means businesses will likely not see uniform nationwide standards on PFAS anytime soon, say Jeffrey Dintzer and Clynton Namuo at Alston & Bird.

  • Calif. Bills Would See Huge Changes For Single-Use Products

    Author Photo

    Recently introduced legislation in California would require a 75% reduction of the waste generated from single-use packaging and products sold in the state by 2030. These bills are the most far-reaching regulation of consumer products and packaging ever in California — but come with no identified funding mechanism, say attorneys at Arnold & Porter.

  • Opinion

    How Lawyers Can Help Save The Planet

    Author Photo

    Over a dozen major law firms have joined our effort to overcome the legal obstacles that states, cities and businesses face in fighting climate change. But more lawyers are needed, say Michael Gerrard of Columbia Law School and John Dernbach of Widener University Commonwealth Law School.

  • Key Takeaways From Roundup Verdicts So Far

    Author Photo

    On May 13, a California jury returned a $2 billion verdict against Monsanto in the third trial over allegations that its popular weedkiller Roundup causes cancer. The Roundup trials highlight the importance of issues including punitive damages, celebrity influence and the value of jury exercises, say attorneys at Wiley Rein.

  • Q&A

    A Chat With Gilead Sciences Legal Ops Leader Gary Tully

    Author Photo

    In this monthly series, legal recruiting experts from Major Lindsey & Africa interview legal industry leaders about the increasingly competitive business environment. Here, Rod Osborne talks with Gary Tully, head of legal operations at Gilead Sciences.

  • Series

    Why I Became A Lawyer: Completing The Journey Home

    Author Photo

    My mother's connection to her Native American heritage had a major influence on my career — my decision to enter the legal profession was driven by the desire to return to my tribal community and help it in any way I could, says Jason Hauter of Akin Gump.

  • Series

    Judging A Book: Wood Reviews 'The Making Of A Justice'

    Author Photo

    Retired U.S. Supreme Court Justice John Paul Stevens' new book, "The Making of a Justice," is required reading for anyone interested in 20th and 21st century America, says Seventh Circuit Chief Judge Diane Wood.

  • PG&E Oversight Battle Looms For FERC, Bankruptcy Court

    Author Photo

    Although the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission recently reasserted its concurrent jurisdiction with the bankruptcy court over the disposition of Pacific Gas and Electric’s wholesale power contracts in bankruptcy, it is reasonable to assume that this clash between two governmental entities will ultimately be resolved in the U.S. Supreme Court, say attorneys at Blank Rome.

  • Getting Out Of Legal Project Management Debt

    Author Photo

    If a client does not demand the application of project management techniques at the start of a matter, or a law firm does not routinely apply them, it is highly likely that additional, avoidable work — legal project management debt — will materialize throughout the matter, says Anthony Widdop of Shearman & Sterling.