Environmental

  • March 25, 2009

    Army Corps Says Omnibus Act OKs Everglades Project

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers has moved to dismiss a suit brought by an American Indian tribe over a proposed highway bridge in the Everglades, citing a section of the Omnibus Appropriations Act of 2009 that instructs the corps to commence construction immediately.

  • March 25, 2009

    Rare Loon Listing Is 'Warranted But Precluded': FWS

    The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has raised the wrath of environmental groups by announcing that although the rare yellow-billed loon merits threatened or endangered status under the Endangered Species Act, it will delay proposing such a listing.

  • March 25, 2009

    European Parliament Ramps Up Ozone Protections

    The European Parliament voted Wednesday to further restrict the use of ozone-depleting substances in the European Union and to take measures to keep the substances from ending up in developing countries.

  • March 25, 2009

    Bill Calls For Phosphate Limits In Dish Detergents

    U.S. Sens. Carl Levin, D-Mich., and George Voinovich, R-Ohio, have introduced a bill in Congress that would cut back on phosphate use in dishwasher detergents, which they claim wrecks aquatic plant and fish life in domestic lakes.

  • March 25, 2009

    Power Cos. Would Take Brunt Of Emission Cuts: Study

    If current proposals to reduce greenhouse gas emissions were put into action, the power sector would bear the largest burden of making good on the required cutbacks, according to a new study.

  • March 25, 2009

    Carbon Caps May Send Power Prices Sky-High: Study

    Carbon cap-and-trade legislation, which might be in place as soon as next year, could cause electricity rates to skyrocket an average of 15 to 30 percent, with the majority of the cost increases being pushed to end users, according to a report from Moody's Investors Service.

  • March 26, 2009

    Bill Presses To Ban Oil, Gas Drilling Off Atlantic Coast

    A New Jersey congressman has put forth a bill in the U.S. House of Representatives that would ban oil and gas drilling from the outer continental shelf off the coasts of Northern and Mid-Atlantic states in an effort to codify and restore a moratorium on energy expeditions in the region that was lifted in 2008.

  • March 26, 2009

    US Rep. Touts Permits As Carbon Market Alternative

    A Washington congressman has proposed a bill in the U.S. House of Representatives that would require producers of coal, petroleum and other sources of carbon dioxide emissions to purchase a federal permit, arguing for an alternative to a proposed cap-and-trade carbon market that could be vulnerable to corruption or collapse.

  • March 24, 2009

    House Bill Seeks $1B Fund For Carbon Capture Efforts

    As the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency moves closer to regulating carbon dioxide, a bill introduced in the U.S. House of Representatives on Tuesday aims to promote the development and use of carbon capture and storage technology through a $1 billion a year fund supported by fees on fossil fuel-generated electricity.

  • March 24, 2009

    Patriot Coal, Green Groups Settle CWA Suit

    Patriot Coal Corp. has agreed to spend over $725,000 to settle two environmental groups' allegations of Clean Water Act violations at a pair of Patriot-owned mining complexes in Appalachia.

  • March 24, 2009

    EPA To Scrutinize Surface Coal Mining Permits

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency said it planned to actively review permit requests for surface coal mining in the wake of a federal appeals court decision last month that opened the door for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to begin granting permits again.

  • March 24, 2009

    LA's Clean Truck Program Is Preempted: 9th Circ.

    A federal appeals court has reversed a lower court's decision in favor of a Los Angeles program that aimed to impose greener trucking operations on one of the nation’s major ports, holding that the ban on older trucks was preempted by federal law.

  • March 24, 2009

    DuPont To Pay $1.6M Over Pollution At WVa Sites

    DuPont Co. has agreed to pay more than $1.6 million for alleged discharge and landfill permit violations at its manufacturing facility and landfills in West Virginia.

  • March 24, 2009

    Arkema, EPA Settle Clean Air Charges

    Industrial chemical producer Arkema Inc. has settled an administrative action brought by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency alleging it violated the Clean Air Act by failing to control the hazardous leaks at its now-closed Riverview, Mich., facility.

  • April 9, 2009

    For Insurers, MTBE Could Be 'New Asbestos'

    The massive litigation over groundwater contamination from methyl tertiary-butyl ether, or MTBE, could spark even more lawsuits and force insurers to cover costly defenses and settlements unless they can prove the fuel additive is a pollutant and not a product, legal experts say.

  • March 23, 2009

    Nations Agree Warming Is Polar Bears' Biggest Threat

    The five countries with polar bear populations have concluded that melting sea ice due to climate change constitutes the most important threat to the species' survival.

  • March 23, 2009

    EPA Moves To Regulate Greenhouse Gases

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has reportedly sent a document to the White House labeling carbon dioxide a danger to public health and welfare, in a move that could give EPA the power to regulate greenhouse gases as pollutants.

  • March 23, 2009

    PG&E Settles With Green Group Over Plant Cleanup

    Pacific Gas & Electric Co. has buried the hatchet with a California environmental group that sued the company over the alleged discharge of pollutants at a former plant in Santa Rosa, Calif., in violation of the Clean Water Act.

  • March 23, 2009

    Obama Announces Picks For 2 Top DOE Posts

    The White House has announced that it submitted nominees with environmental policy backgrounds to fill two top-level administrative posts at the U.S. Department of Energy, and said it plans to retain the department's current chief financial officer, Steve Isakowitz.

  • March 23, 2009

    Emissions Rule Violates Federal Law: Pork Groups

    Two pork industry groups have moved for summary judgment on their claim that a federal rule requiring large farms to report animal waste emissions to state and local officials violates a federal statute exempting "routine agricultural operations" from emissions reporting requirements.