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Florida

  • May 25, 2018

    Law360's Pro Say: Why Are All The Partners Still Men?

    Are you looking around your firm and still seeing a lot of men in leadership? On the latest episode of Law360's Pro Say podcast we discuss our annual Glass Ceiling report, which reveals little progress for women in the law, and we speak with Kerrie Campbell, an attorney who filed a high-profile gender bias suit against her firm.

  • May 25, 2018

    What Does Gender Parity In The Legal Industry Look Like?

    Law360 asked more than 40 women how we’ll know when the legal industry has achieved true gender parity. Here’s what they had to say.

  • May 25, 2018

    The Best Law Firms For Female Attorneys

    While the latest Glass Ceiling Report again shows only incremental growth for female lawyers in private practice, some firms are proving that building a more equitable profession is possible. Here are the law firms leading the way.

  • May 25, 2018

    Enviros Must Specify Water Pollution Fixes To Fla. Utility

    A Florida magistrate judge on Friday ordered environmental groups suing Florida Power & Light Co. over water pollution from its Turkey Point nuclear plant near Miami to provide the utility with specifics about what they demand the utility do to remediate the problem.

  • May 25, 2018

    Monopoly Argument Falls Short In Bid For New Fla. Hospice

    A Florida appeals court ruled Friday that despite the presence of a regional monopoly in hospice services in and around Sarasota County, the state's health administrative agency acted within its legal rights when it denied a certificate of need application for a new provider based on other factors.

  • May 25, 2018

    Fla. Cable Tie Co. Says Rival Hired Unauthorized Immigrants

    A Florida cable tie manufacturer has accused a competitor of hiring immigrants who lack work authorization in violation of the Florida Deceptive and Unfair Trade Practices Act in a suit that was moved to Florida federal court on Friday.

  • May 25, 2018

    Fla. High Court Won't Lift Stay In Pot Right-To-Grow Appeal

    A Florida man who won an order allowing him to grow marijuana for his medical use will have to wait until the state's appeal plays out before possibly gaining access to the plant, as the Florida Supreme Court on Friday denied his request to vacate the appeals court's stay.

  • May 25, 2018

    21st Century Oncology Escapes Contract Fraud Claims

    A New York bankruptcy judge on Friday dismissed a whistleblower’s claims that the cancer treatment chain 21st Century Oncology bribed and threatened its way to a contract with a Florida health system, saying he had not supplied the specifics to back the accusation.

  • May 25, 2018

    Chili's Parent Co. Sued For Negligence Over Data Breach

    The parent company of Chili’s Grill & Bar was hit with a putative class action in Florida federal court Thursday over hacked customer credit and debit card information, less than two weeks after the company announced that a data breach had affected some of its 1,600 restaurants.

  • May 25, 2018

    Magistrate Won't Stay Discovery In TIKD's Antitrust Suit

    A Florida magistrate judge said Friday he could not halt discovery in the $11.4 million antitrust suit filed by traffic ticket services startup TIKD against the Florida Bar and a traffic ticket law firm, as he feared doing so would step on the toes of the presiding judge.

  • May 25, 2018

    Dish Copyright Defendants Scolded In Denial Of Early Win

    A Florida federal judge chastised defendants in a copyright infringement suit filed by Dish Network LLC for failing to follow court instructions as she struck down several motions they filed seeking an early win on claims they distributed Arabic pay-TV programming without authorization.

  • May 25, 2018

    Avis Says Car Renter In Insurance Row Has No Standing

    Avis Budget Car Rental LLC asked a Florida federal judge to toss the remaining claims in a long-running class action over an alleged insurance coverage fraud, saying the court record proves the renter was provided with contractual liability coverage and thus does not have standing.

  • May 25, 2018

    Taxation With Representation: Davis Polk, Wachtell, Hogan

    In this week’s Taxation with Representation, Wabtec merged with General Electric’s transportation unit in an $11.1 billion deal, NextEra snapped up Southern Co.'s Florida utilities for $6.48 billion, MB Financial and Fifth Third merged in a $4.7 billion deal, and Adobe acquired Magento for $1.68 billion.

  • May 24, 2018

    Philip Morris, RJR Hit With $21M Verdict In Engle Case

    A Florida jury has hit Philip Morris and R.J. Reynolds with a $21 million award for contributing to the lung cancer death of a lifetime smoker, in one of the thousands of so-called Engle progeny cases.

  • May 24, 2018

    Maritime Co. Tries To Revive $2.5M Antitrust Defense Fight

    Crowley Maritime Corp. urged the Eleventh Circuit to revive the shipping company's lawsuit to force an AIG unit to cover the $2.5 million that Crowley shelled out to defend a subsidiary's former executive against antitrust allegations, asserting Thursday that it provided timely notice of the claim to the insurer.

  • May 24, 2018

    Pro Golfer Gets Suit Over Promotion Deals Putted To Fla.

    A Washington federal judge approved a request to transfer to Florida a supplement company’s breach-of-contract suit against professional golfer Greg Norman, finding Thursday that the relevant contract was negotiated and signed in the Sunshine State.

  • May 24, 2018

    Procaps Hits Carlton Fields With $15M Malpractice Suit

    Procaps SA has brought a $15 million malpractice suit against Carlton Fields in Florida state court, accusing the firm of encouraging it to bring a disastrous antitrust suit against its former partner and not disclosing that the Colombian drugmaker could be left on the hook for attorneys’ fees if it lost.

  • May 24, 2018

    Judge Confirms Cardno's $15M Award Over Deal Gone Bad

    A Florida federal judge on Wednesday confirmed a nearly $15 million arbitral award for Australia's Cardno International Pty Ltd. in a dispute over its soured acquisition of an Ecuadorian engineering firm, saying the owners of the target company didn't offer a valid reason for refusing to enforce the award.

  • May 24, 2018

    Ex-MLB Pitcher Says Rival Academy Stole Training Program

    A former Major League Baseball pitcher alleges that a Washington resident stole trade secrets and other proprietary information about his baseball academy and training program designed to improve performance and reduce injuries, according to a suit removed to Florida federal court Thursday. 

  • May 24, 2018

    Developer, Gov’t Settle $30M Fla. Munitions Cleanup Suit

    A Florida federal judge has dismissed a lawsuit after being informed of a settlement between the U.S. government and a developer that sought up to $30.5 million in cleanup costs for an Orlando site that was used for World War II-era U.S. Air Force munitions testing, according to a filing on Wednesday in Florida federal court.

Expert Analysis

  • 50 Years After MLK's Death, Housing Segregation Persists

    Rigel Oliveri

    On the 50th anniversary of Martin Luther King Jr.'s assassination, which likely influenced passage of the Fair Housing Act, segregation levels have decreased but still remain high. As a result, fair housing lawyers have turned their attention to the structural and economic forces that limit housing opportunities, says Rigel Oliveri of the University of Missouri.

  • Opinion

    Rum, Cannabis And The 4th Amendment: A History Lesson

    Collin Wedel

    U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions recently made his first move against legal marijuana by reversing the U.S. Justice Department’s policy of not enforcing federal cannabis laws in states that had legalized it. Sessions might be wise to study how a crackdown on contraband rum helped incite the American Revolution and influenced the U.S. Constitution, says Collin Wedel of Sidley Austin LLP.

  • Single Factor Income Apportionment: Inconsistent Standard

    Glenn Newman

    A majority of states claim that in-state sales are sufficient nexus to collect corporate income tax from businesses physically located across state lines, but income apportionment methods are inconsistent. Companies need to be prepared for the day one state seeks to collect a share of income tax that's already been paid to another, says Glenn Newman of Greenberg Traurig LLP.

  • Opinion

    BigLaw Doesn't Have A Diversity Problem

    Marlen Whitley

    Although the lack of racial and gender diversity among the ranks of the majority of both midsized and top law firms is a major issue, it’s past time to shed light on the real problem — inclusion, or lack thereof, says Marlen Whitley of Reed Smith LLP.

  • The Importance Of Attorney Etiquette In The Courtroom

    Christina Marinakis

    It’s difficult to say whether an attorney’s social etiquette has any impact on the verdict outcome, but the fact that jurors continually tell us about counsel’s irksome behaviors suggests that, at the very least, these behaviors distract jurors from the issues on which they should be concentrating, says Christina Marinakis, director of jury research at Litigation Insights.

  • Opinion

    Roman J. Israel, Esquire, Meet Donald J. Trump, POTUS

    Kevin Curnin

    Despite the Trump administration's desire to shut down the Legal Services Corp., thankfully the budget that Congress passed and the president signed into law last week has restored $410 million of funding to the legal aid organization. An unlikely brief for preserving LSC may be found in the quirky Denzel Washington film "Roman J. Israel, Esq.," says Kevin Curnin, immediate past president of the Association of Pro Bono Counsel.

  • Opinion

    We Need A Cybersecurity Framework For Law Firms

    Shaun Jamison

    In order to enable lawyers to best meet cybersecurity challenges, state bars should pass rules that adopt a cybersecurity framework to be developed by a national committee, says Shaun Jamison, associate dean of faculty and professor at Purdue University's Concord Law School.

  • Equity Partnership Isn’t What It Used To Be

    Jeff Liebster

    To many young attorneys, becoming an equity partner shows a firm's long-term commitment, meaning job security and a voice in important firm matters. However, the industry has changed and nowadays it may not be better to enter a new firm as an equity partner, says Jeffrey Liebster of Major Lindsey & Africa.

  • Series

    Judging A Book: Hardiman Reviews 'Without Precedent'

    Judge Thomas Hardiman

    In his new book, "Without Precedent: Chief Justice John Marshall and His Times," professor Joel Richard Paul ably explains more than a dozen of Marshall’s most significant opinions, which comes as no surprise​. ​What is a surprise — a pleasant one — is the book's readability, says Judge Thomas Hardiman of the Third Circuit.

  • A Shift On Employee Title VII Protections At 6th Circ.

    Michael Pepperman

    While the Sixth Circuit held in 2006 that Title VII didn't cover sexual orientation discrimination, the court's recent decision in U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission v. R.G. & G.R. Harris Funeral Homes is part of the current trend of courts broadly construing the meaning of “sex discrimination” and increasing workplace protections under federal law for LGBT employees, say attorneys with Obermayer Rebmann Maxwell & Hippel LLP.