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Food & Beverage

  • August 14, 2018

    US Can't Ease Mexican Import Ban Protecting Porpoise: CIT

    The U.S. Court of International Trade on Tuesday rejected the Trump administration’s bid to limit the scope of a recent ban on seafood imported from Mexico caught with an all-encompassing net that kills the world's smallest and most endangered porpoise, affirming the ban is “effective immediately.”

  • August 14, 2018

    Hilton Suites Can't Escape Barista's Disability Bias Suit

    An Illinois federal judge kept alive a barista’s disability discrimination suit against her former employer, Chicago’s Hilton Suites hotel, finding she had provided enough proof at this stage to support her claim that she was treated differently due to her disability.

  • August 14, 2018

    Dr. McGillicuddy's Hits Rival Mint Liqueur With TM Suit

    A cocktail company that makes Dr. McGillicuddy's — a mint-flavored liqueur dubbed "the most popular shot in Massachusetts" — hit a rival spirits maker with a trademark suit in federal court Monday, claiming the company is using an eerily similar logo featuring a mustachioed man and turn-of-the-century images.

  • August 14, 2018

    1 NASA Small-Biz Contract, 1 Giant Leap For Plantkind

    Nanotechnology development company UbiQD Inc. said that it has nabbed a NASA contract that will help fund its work on a nanoparticle film intended to bolster crop growth and production during in-space missions and planetary explorations.

  • August 13, 2018

    David Boies On How Dyslexia Shaped His Practice

    One of the country’s highest-profile litigators, the Boies Schiller Flexner LLP chairman was diagnosed with dyslexia when he was in his 30s. In an interview with Law360, he talks about practicing law with the learning disability. This article is part of our special report on disability inclusion in the legal industry.

  • August 13, 2018

    BigLaw’s Mental Health Stigma Shows Signs Of Fading

    Sometimes viewed as an “invisible” disability, mental illness has long been forced under wraps because of the risk attorneys could face bias and stigma. Here’s how lawyers, law firms and other groups are starting to take on the status quo. This article is part of our special report on disability inclusion in the legal industry.

  • August 13, 2018

    5 State AGs Argue Against $62B Bayer-Monsanto Deal

    In opposition to Bayer AG’s planned $62 billion acquisition of Monsanto Co., the attorneys general of California, Iowa, Massachusetts, Mississippi and Oregon sent a comment letter to the U.S. Department of Justice, arguing that the deal would concentrate an already narrow seed market and threaten innovation.

  • August 13, 2018

    Calif. Panel Nixes WinCo Foods Meal Break Suit

    A California state appellate court on Monday upheld the dismissal of a proposed class action accusing supermarket chain WinCo Foods LLC of stiffing hourly workers at a California location of some meal breaks, saying the parties legally waived breaks for certain shifts in a collective bargaining agreement.

  • August 13, 2018

    Farmers, Dairy Co-Op Reach $40M Deal To End Milk Price Suit

    A California federal court was asked Monday to approve a $40 million settlement to resolve putative claims for tens of thousands of dairy farms alleging that cooperative DairyAmerica Inc. and affiliate California Dairies conspired to boost profits by lowballing milk prices paid to farmers.

  • August 13, 2018

    Rakoff Hits Ailing Cocoa Trader With 3 Years In $350M Fraud

    Peter G. Johnson, whose cocoa trading business Transmar went under after it deceived lenders out of more than $350 million, was sentenced to three years behind bars by U.S. District Judge Jed Rakoff on Monday, with the judge weighing the loss against Johnson’s life of good works.

  • August 13, 2018

    San Diego Beats Monsanto Water Pollution Counterclaims

    Monsanto Co. lost a bid to flip a lawsuit over its alleged pollution of the San Diego Bay by blaming it on the city’s stormwater system when a California federal judge found that the company didn’t have standing to bring counterclaims because it suffered no direct injury from the contamination.

  • August 13, 2018

    Cozen O'Connor Hires New Head For Calif. Franchise Practice

    Cozen O'Connor has hired the former chair of Snell & Wilmer LLP’s franchise services group to work from its Los Angeles office, where she will head up the firm’s global franchise practice.

  • August 13, 2018

    NYC Restaurant Group Fights Foam Ban At Appeals Court

    A trade group representing restaurants and foam manufacturers has taken its opposition to New York City's ban on styrofoam, effective Jan. 1, to state appellate court, saying Mayor Bill de Blasio is unfairly resisting the city council's mandate to recycle polystyrene and that recycling is both economically feasible and environmentally effective.

  • August 13, 2018

    9th Circ. Nixes Suit Over Frozen Burger Hydrogenated Oil

    A San Diego woman can’t sue a maker of frozen foods for putting partially hydrogenated oil in its microwaveable burger snacks, the Ninth Circuit has ruled, affirming a lower court’s decision that found she had failed to establish the practice was unfair or unlawful.

  • August 13, 2018

    Winery Can't Ban 'Cellar Lives Matter' Vest, NLRB Judge Says

    Woodbridge Winery violated federal labor law when it barred an employee from wearing a safety vest adorned with the slogan “Cellar Lives Matter,” since it was connected to union activity and wasn't offensive, a National Labor Relations Board judge ruled.  

  • August 13, 2018

    Glycine Exporter Can't Dodge $11M Smuggling Scheme Claim

    A California federal judge struck down a food additive exporter's attempt to throw out claims saying it had smuggled glycine into the U.S. from China without paying more than $11 million in required duties, calling the exporter's use of the Fifth Amendment "both a sword and shield."

  • August 10, 2018

    How The Legal Industry Lets Down Lawyers With Disabilities

    The dissolution of a five-year-old bar group marks the latest setback for disabled attorneys, who often find little support while navigating an inhospitable industry. This is the first article in a special report on disability inclusion in the legal industry.

  • August 10, 2018

    Gaining Access: Disabled Lawyers Share Their Stories

    In a series of interviews, lawyers tell Law360 how even well-intentioned professors can create barriers, how inclusivity can help a firm’s litigation prowess, and how “inspirational” can be a dirty word. This article is part of our special report on disability inclusion in the legal industry.

  • August 10, 2018

    Restaurants Imposed 'Tax' To Steal Servers' Tips, Suit Says

    Three Italian restaurants in southwestern New Jersey were hit Thursday with a putative class action in state court alleging their owners and operators routinely stole tips from servers through a policy known as the “Coppola Tax,” named after the family behind the businesses.

  • August 10, 2018

    Mexican Treat Maker Infringed Rival's TMs, DC Circ. Holds

    The D.C. Circuit on Friday affirmed a D.C. federal court’s ruling that a Mexico-based maker of a hand-held frozen snack infringed the trademarks of a California-based maker of the treats featuring a girl dressed in indigenous clothing and that the California company did not infringe any rights held by its rival.

Expert Analysis

  • Series

    Clerking For Ginsburg: How To Play The Long Game

    Arun Subramanian

    One of us was a clerk when Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg read her Ledbetter dissent from the bench, inviting Congress to act, and the other clerked a few years later, when RBG's prominently displayed copy of the Lilly Ledbetter Fair Pay Act served as a daily reminder that dissents are not just for show, say Arun Subramanian and Mark Musico of Susman Godfrey LLP.

  • Considerations When Hiring A Seasonal Workforce

    Chas Rampenthal

    Traditionally, business owners — particularly within highly seasonal industries like hospitality — have turned to immigrant labor and the H-2B visa as a way to fill employment gaps. But with these visas under intense scrutiny lately, employers considering other options should proceed with caution, says Chas Rampenthal, general counsel at LegalZoom.

  • Inside The Latest Congressional Hearing On Crypto

    Todd Friedman

    Following a July hearing by the House Committee on Agriculture on the regulation of cryptocurrencies and blockchain technology, Todd Friedman of Silver Miller recaps the views of various stakeholders — from the former head of JPMorgan's blockchain program to a former chairman of the U.S. Commodity Futures Trading Commission.

  • Series

    Clerking For Ginsburg: In Pursuit Of Precision

    Trevor Morrison

    As clerks for Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, we learned early on that, when preparing a memorandum or draft opinion, it was essential to present any opposing argument in its strongest possible light. There is a lesson here for today's public debates, says Trevor Morrison, dean of NYU Law School.

  • Series

    Clerking For Ginsburg: My RBG Guide To Judging

    Goodwin Liu

    I clerked for Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg before the days of RBG bobbleheads and “You Can’t Spell Truth Without Ruth” T-shirts. I had no idea I would become a judge, and I feel lucky every day that I had the chance to learn from her, says California Supreme Court Justice Goodwin Liu.

  • FLSA Settlements Face Challenges In NY After Cheeks Ruling

    Alex Umansky

    Following the mandated court review of all Fair Labor Standards Act settlements, which resulted from the Second Circuit's decision in Cheeks v. Freeport Pancake House, two recent decisions show how courts have begun to routinely reject agreements that contain terms once considered boilerplate, say Alex Umansky and Jeffrey Rosenberg of the Law Office of Yuriy Moshes PC.

  • Gap Between Calif. And Federal Wage And Hour Law Grows

    Kirstin Muller

    In its recent decision in Troester v. Starbucks, the California Supreme Court unanimously rejected application of the federal Fair Labor Standards Act’s “de minimis” doctrine to California wage and hour law. The ruling changes the state's employment law landscape in important ways, says Kirstin Muller of Hirschfeld Kraemer LLP.

  • Series

    Clerking For Ginsburg: 4 Things I Learned

    Judge John Owens

    A lot has changed since I clerked for Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg 20 years ago. At that time, I had hair and no wife. I also thought I knew everything — but working for the justice made me realize very quickly that I actually knew very little, says Ninth Circuit Judge John Owens.

  • Strategies For Dealing With US-China Tariffs

    Russell Menyhart

    Increasing U.S. and Chinese tariffs have magnified the challenges of doing business internationally, particularly for small and medium-sized enterprises. But review of products' tariff classifications, the public comment process for proposed tariffs, and tariff exemption applications all provide companies with opportunities to reduce harm, say Russell Menyhart and Ying Zhu of Taft Stettinius & Hollister LLP.

  • Series

    Clerking For Ginsburg: The Equality Lessons

    Margo Schlanger

    In 1993, Ruth Bader Ginsburg was confirmed to the U.S. Supreme Court, and I began my two-year clerkship with her. In her first opinion as a justice, and in dozens since, Justice Ginsburg reminded us how the law needs to operate if equality is to be a reality, says Margo Schlanger, a professor at the University of Michigan Law School.