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Government Contracts

  • June 18, 2018

    GCs Tackle Law Firm Culture In Diversity Push

    Following an American Bar Association pledge, in-house attorneys are taking a harder line in demanding diversity from their outside counsel, and they're seeking to play a larger role in the workings of the law firms they hire.

  • June 18, 2018

    The Hurdles Facing BigLaw’s Minority Women

    We asked BigLaw for data on female minority lawyers for the first time this year, and the results show an industry that is failing to attract and retain them. Here’s a look at the challenges facing these attorneys — and how a few firms are defying the norm.

  • June 18, 2018

    The Best Firms For Minority Equity Partners

    The legal industry is making sluggish gains when it comes to attracting and retaining attorneys of color, but this select group of firms is taking broader strides to diversify at the top.

  • June 18, 2018

    Fed. Circ. Backs Split Navy Patent Decision, Boosts Damages

    The Federal Circuit in a decision made public Monday upheld a ruling that one of the U.S. Navy’s littoral combat ships had infringed on a company’s fast ship patents and that another vessel had not, while slightly upping the damages award to $7.1 million.

  • June 18, 2018

    Ex-SUNY Prez Tells Jury He Cut Red Tape For 'Buffalo Billion'

    Former State University of New York President Alain Kaloyeros denied scheming with developers in a fraudulent end-run around the contracting process in Gov. Andrew Cuomo's "Buffalo Billion" revitalization effort, telling a Manhattan federal jury Monday his goal was to move nimbly on three projects worth $600 million.

  • June 18, 2018

    DISA Awards 14 Cos. Places On $7.5B IT Services Deal

    The Defense Information Systems Agency has awarded 14 companies slots on a $7.5 billion, decade-long systems engineering and technology deal meant to help the U.S. Department of Defense improve its information technology capabilities, the agency announced.

  • June 18, 2018

    Amazon Urged Not To Sell Face-Recognition Tool To Gov't

    Some Amazon Inc. investors joined privacy advocates Monday in pressing the tech giant to stop selling its real-time facial recognition tools to law enforcement, citing human rights concerns that could hurt the company's stock price and spawn lawsuits.

  • June 18, 2018

    Senate Votes To Pass Defense Policy, Reform Bill

    The U.S. Senate passed the sweeping National Defense Authorization Act on Monday, kickstarting a process with the House to iron out differences over project priorities, force numbers, international trade and other policies in the $715 billion authorization and reform bill.

  • June 18, 2018

    In Their Own Words: Minority Partners On Reaching The Top

    Despite decades of industrywide initiatives, movement up the ladder has stagnated for minority lawyers. Here, five industry success stories tell Law360 about the paths they took and what needs to change in BigLaw.

  • June 18, 2018

    Mammoet Seeks $2.8M For Unpaid Power Plant Work

    Industrial transportation company Mammoet USA North Inc. is seeking $2.8 million in damages from a construction joint venture that allegedly stiffed it on subcontracting agreements related to two power plants in New Jersey and Connecticut, according to a filing Friday in New York state court.

  • June 18, 2018

    Pa. Injury Firm Inks Deal With Feds For Medicare Repayments

    Federal prosecutors said Monday they'd inked a deal with Philadelphia-based Rosenbaum & Associates to resolve claims that the personal injury firm failed to reimburse the government for Medicare payments made to health care providers on behalf of clients.

  • June 15, 2018

    Minority Lawyers On Why They Left BigLaw

    Despite the proliferation of diversity committees and inclusion initiatives, corporate law firms remain overwhelmingly white and male, especially at leadership levels. Here, minority attorneys discuss their reasons for leaving a large firm.

  • June 15, 2018

    Taking On The ‘Petri Dish’ Of BigLaw Bias

    The often-informal processes for deciding matters like compensation at law firms can create, as one expert put it, a “petri dish” for the effects of unconscious bias. Here’s how some firms are looking to shake up the system.

  • June 15, 2018

    The Best Firms For Minority Attorneys

    While U.S. law firms have long vowed to make their ranks more diverse and inclusive, the industry has long failed to deliver on those promises. Here are the firms making some headway, according to this year’s Diversity Snapshot.

  • June 15, 2018

    Law360’s Diversity Snapshot: By The Numbers

    Efforts to increase diversity have again yielded few meaningful changes in law firm demographics, according to Law360’s annual headcount survey, even as law schools continue to enroll students of color in increasing numbers.

  • June 15, 2018

    Law360’s Pro Say: What BigLaw Should Do About Diversity

    For years law firms have had programs aimed at increasing attorney diversity, but nothing is working. On this week’s Pro Say podcast we take a look at our latest survey of diversity at law firms, and unpack what experts say are the things that could actually move the needle on this issue.

  • June 15, 2018

    FCA Decision Tracker: Continued Interpretations Of Escobar

    Two years after the U.S. Supreme Court's Escobar ruling shook up the legal landscape for False Claims Act cases, Law360’s ninth post-Escobar roundup explores how courts are continuing to address key parts of the decision.

  • June 15, 2018

    Letter For Defendant Spells Trouble For Miami-Dade Judge

    A public reprimand has been recommended for a Florida state judge who wrote a character reference letter on behalf of a man awaiting federal court sentencing for his role in a $63 million Medicare kickback scheme, according to a formal complaint Friday by the state’s Judicial Qualifications Commission.

  • June 15, 2018

    BSGR Seeks OK To Depose Soros In $10B Guinea Mining Row

    Mining companies associated with Israeli billionaire Beny Steinmetz that are accusing George Soros of inducing Guinea to ax their iron mining rights asked a New York federal court on Thursday to allow them to depose the business magnate and start collecting evidence even as a related arbitration remains pending.

  • June 15, 2018

    GAO Sustains Protest Over $70M Military Food Contract

    The U.S. Government Accountability Office has sustained a protest from a food services company alleging the U.S. Defense Logistics Agency lacked transparency in awarding a $69.8 million contract that covers military food services in allied Asian countries, according to a June 4 opinion unsealed Friday.

Expert Analysis

  • Knowledge Lawyers Can Help Firms Stay Ahead Of The Curve

    Vanessa Pinto Villa

    In a profession notoriously averse to change, it should come as no surprise that there is skepticism about the value of having attorneys perform nonbillable tasks. But U.S. law firms have slowly begun to incorporate knowledge lawyers into their operations — and the trend is likely to continue, says Vanessa Pinto Villa of Hogan Lovells.

  • An Unprecedented Look Inside The FARA Unit

    Brian Fleming

    For close observers of the Foreign Agents Registration Act, the June 8 release by the U.S. Department of Justice of over 50 FARA advisory opinions was a watershed. These opinions offer an unprecedented glimpse into how the FARA Registration Unit interprets the law, say Brian Fleming and Andrew Herman of Miller & Chevalier Chtd.

  • Contractors Must Look For Potential Claims Before Payment

    Justin Scott

    A contract dispute between the Army Corps of Engineers and Merrick Construction illustrates the importance of proper record-keeping and documentation throughout the life of a construction project. Otherwise, potential claims may fall through the cracks, especially when a critical employee leaves the project and responsibility must be transferred to someone else, says Justin Scott of Bradley Arant Boult Cummings LLP.

  • Why Lawyers Shouldn't Accept Fees In Cryptocurrency: Part 2

    John Reed Stark

    The legal industry has already begun to feel the impact of anti-bribery and anti-money laundering requirements. When involved with cryptocurrency trading and remittance, law firms face more than the risk of being perceived as organizations that support money laundering practices, says John Reed Stark of John Reed Stark Consulting LLC.

  • Why Lawyers Shouldn't Accept Fees In Cryptocurrency: Part 1

    John Reed Stark

    Law firms are increasingly accepting cryptocurrency as payment for services. While this might seem innovative and forward-thinking, ironically it is much more of a throwback, says John Reed Stark of John Reed Stark Consulting LLC.

  • GAO Will Police 'Other Transaction Authority' Awards

    Ronald Lee

    The U.S. Government Accountability Office's Oracle decision acts as a shot across the bow to agencies exploring Other Transaction Authority agreements as alternatives to traditional contracting, say attorneys with Arnold & Porter.

  • Congress’ Overlooked Environmental Legislation

    Rachel Jacobson

    The House recently passed — and now the Senate is considering — the most important piece of energy and environmental legislation it will consider all year. It isn’t a revision to the Endangered Species Act or the Clean Water Act. It's the National Defense Authorization Act, say attorneys with WilmerHale.

  • Impediments To Legal Industry's 'Inevitable' Future: Part 2

    Craig Levinson

    I agree with the legal pundits speculating that NewLaw’s present and future disruptors will radically change the legal services industry, but that change may not come quite as rapidly as predicted. Regardless, now is the time for both the incumbents and the challengers to best position themselves for the eventual shakeup, says Craig Levinson, founder of Levity Partners.

  • A Breath Of Life For Calif. FCA Insurance Coverage

    Jan Larson

    The Ninth Circuit recently revived an insurance coverage dispute between Office Depot and AIG, holding that coverage for alleged violations of the California False Claims Act is not categorically precluded by California law. Similarities between the CFCA and the federal False Claims Act raise potential for broad application of this decision, say Jan Larson and Sebastian Brady of Jenner & Block LLP.

  • Impediments To Legal Industry's 'Inevitable' Future: Part 1

    Craig Levinson

    Legal pundits continue to make predictions that newer entrants into the industry — NewLaw firms, the Big Four and alternative legal service providers — will progressively seize greater amounts of market share from traditional law firms. But the BigLaw response has been underwhelming at best, and a glimpse at the market forces puts its lack of urgency into perspective, says Craig Levinson, founder of Levity Partners.