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Government Contracts

  • September 20, 2018

    Debarred Subcontractor Sinks Army Deal, GAO Finds

    The U.S. Army reasonably rescinded nearly $65 million in information technology task orders for the Afghan government when it discovered the main subcontractor was debarred in Afghanistan, the U.S. Government Accountability Office ruled in a decision made public Thursday.

  • September 20, 2018

    Cybersecurity Soon To Be Key To DOD Deals, Official Says

    Deputy Defense Secretary Patrick Shanahan said Wednesday that strong cybersecurity will likely become one of the key pillars for determining U.S. Department of Defense contract awards in the future, also laying out further details on the DOD’s plans for implementing the proposed U.S. Space Force.

  • September 20, 2018

    White House Cyber Plan Calls For Deterrence, Legal Revamp

    The White House warned Thursday that it would authorize offensive cybersecurity operations and "modernize" federal computer crime laws as part of a new national cybersecurity strategy.

  • September 20, 2018

    Award In Saudi Contract Row Should Be Nixed, Court Hears

    A U.S. military contractor urged a Georgia federal court on Wednesday to toss a suit seeking to confirm an emergency arbitral award ordering it not to terminate a subcontract under a deal to help maintain Saudi Arabian military aircraft, arguing that it never agreed to arbitrate the dispute.

  • September 20, 2018

    Chicago Train Subcontractor Says It's Owed $8M For Work

    An engineering subcontractor for a Chicago L train renovation project slapped general contractor Ragnar Benson Construction LLC with an $8 million lawsuit in Illinois federal court Wednesday, alleging the construction firm prevented the engineering company from altering the subcontract to account for excusable delays and withheld payment for services already rendered.

  • September 20, 2018

    Cuomo's Former Right-Hand Man Gets 6 Years For Bribery

    A Manhattan federal judge hit Joe Percoco, New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo's former top aide, with a six-year prison term Thursday for taking bribes in exchange for helping allies in the energy and real estate sectors with state projects, telling the defendant his actions were "corrosive" to the workings of government.

  • September 20, 2018

    Trump Slams $857B Defense Bill Over Lack Of Border Funds

    President Donald Trump on Thursday threw a potential spanner in the works for a pending $857 billion bill to fund federal defense, labor and health spending for 2019, slamming lawmakers for failing to include funding for his signature border wall project.

  • September 19, 2018

    Gov't Contractor Aims To DQ Saudi Co.'s Atty In Contract Row

    An attorney for a Saudi subcontractor should be disqualified from the subcontractor's suit seeking to confirm an arbitration award against an American defense and logistics contractor as the attorney's prior representation of the U.S. company creates a conflict of interest, the contractor told a Georgia federal court Wednesday.

  • September 19, 2018

    Feds Correctly Sank $40M Navy Contract, ASBCA Says

    The federal government was right to cut loose a construction contractor with a history of missing deadlines after it fell far behind on a $40.3 million project for the U.S. Navy in Bahrain, the Armed Services Board of Contract Appeals said in a recently released decision.

  • September 19, 2018

    Navy Calls For Bids To Supply Leased Intranet Hardware

    The U.S. Navy on Tuesday opened bids on a potentially lucrative deal for hardware for its internal network modernization program, saying it will look to lease equipment as a service rather than buying outright.

  • September 19, 2018

    Fed. Circ. Rejects Challenge To $10B VA Health Records Deal

    The Federal Circuit said Wednesday that the Court of Federal Claims was right to reject CliniComp International’s challenge to rival Cerner's sole-source deal to overhaul the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs’ electronic health records system, ruling that CliniComp had failed to show it could meet the VA’s requirements for the work.

  • September 19, 2018

    Contractor Says Insurer Can't Appeal Sports Complex Fight

    Members of a contractor joint venture have urged a Texas federal judge not to allow Mt. Hawley Insurance Co. to appeal a ruling that required it to defend them against a lawsuit over allegedly faulty construction on a San Antonio-area sports complex, saying Mt. Hawley does not have an adequate question that needs review by the Fifth Circuit.

  • September 19, 2018

    Novartis Warping Kickback Standard In FCA Case, DOJ Says

    Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corp. has flatly “misstated the law” in its bid to escape a whistleblower’s False Claims Act suit alleging illicit kickbacks aimed at boosting Medicare Part D business, the U.S. Department of Justice told a New Jersey federal court Tuesday.

  • September 18, 2018

    Consultant Gets 4 Years For Kickback Scheme At NJ Agency

    A New Jersey federal judge on Tuesday slammed a political consultant with a four-year prison term for her role in a kickback scheme at a defunct Newark water agency, saying she was part of the “inner circle of this tremendous fraud" that ultimately brought down the organization.

  • September 18, 2018

    OSHA Fines Contractors For Deadly Fla. Bridge Collapse

    Five contractors who worked on the design and construction of a pedestrian bridge that collapsed in Miami in March, killing six people, have been issued citations and fines, the federal Occupational Safety and Health Administration announced Tuesday.

  • September 18, 2018

    Northrop Blocks NASA From Releasing Contract In FOIA Filing

    A D.C. federal judge on Tuesday sided with Northrop Grumman Systems Corp. in its bid to block NASA from fulfilling a Freedom of Information Act request that the defense contractor had claimed would have exposed details about a subsidiary's contract and pricing practices.

  • September 18, 2018

    AbbVie Kickbacks Tainted $1.3B In Humira Claims, Calif. Says

    AbbVie Inc. generated nearly $1.3 billion in tainted health insurance claims for its blockbuster immunosuppressant Humira by paying kickbacks in the form of cash, alcohol, trips and an elaborate network of “nurse ambassadors,” California regulators said in a complaint filed Tuesday.

  • September 18, 2018

    Canadian Miner Seeks €750M From Greece Over Permit Delays

    Canadian mining company Eldorado Gold Corp. said Tuesday that its Greek subsidiary Hellas Gold SA is seeking €750 million ($877.35 million) from the Greek government for costs allegedly incurred by delays in the issuance of permits for the company’s Skouries mine.

  • September 18, 2018

    Senate Passes Final $857B Defense, Health Bill For 2019

    The U.S. Senate on Tuesday passed the final version of an $857 billion bill funding federal defense, labor and health spending for 2019, legislation that will also temporarily extend other federal funding through early December to avoid a government shutdown ahead of the midterm elections.

  • September 18, 2018

    Mass. Hospital Rips FCA Claims Med Students Not Supervised

    Massachusetts General Hospital argued Monday that a former anesthesiologist’s False Claims Act lawsuit citing specific bills fails to properly show that the renowned teaching hospital overbilled government health programs for time patients spent in the care of unsupervised doctors-in-training or waiting on overbooked surgery units.

Expert Analysis

  • Leveraging Today's Lateral Associate Market

    Darin Morgan

    With the Milbank/Cravath pay scale once again equalizing compensation at many Am Law 100 firms, there is even more pressure for firms to differentiate themselves to top lateral associate candidates. This presents strategic considerations for both law firms and lateral candidates throughout the recruitment process, says Darin Morgan of Major Lindsey & Africa.

  • Q&A

    Back To School: Stanford's Jeff Fisher Talks Supreme Court

    Jeffrey Fisher

    In this series featuring law school luminaries, Stanford Law School professor Jeffrey Fisher discusses his motivation for teaching, arguing before the U.S. Supreme Court and what the court might look like if Judge Brett Kavanaugh is confirmed.

  • Aviation Watch: Why The F-35 Has Struggled To Take Flight

    Alan Hoffman

    Seventeen years after the U.S. Department of Defense awarded Lockheed Martin the contract for the F-35 Joint Strike Fighter, and 12 years after the first production aircraft flew in 2006, all versions of the plane remain far from combat-ready, or even fully operational. Recent concerns about cybersecurity have added to the project's woes, says Alan Hoffman, a retired attorney and private pilot.

  • Fed. Circ. Case Steers Agencies Toward Commercial Vendors

    Nathaniel Castellano

    The Federal Circuit's decision last week in Palantir v. U.S. breathed new life into the government’s obligations to prioritize the acquisition of commercial and nondevelopmental solutions. It may prove to be one of the most significant procurement precedents of the decade, say attorneys with Arnold & Porter.

  • How A Hurricane Affects Gov't Contractors

    Joseph Berger

    During and immediately after a catastrophic event such as Hurricane Florence, government contractors must prioritize protection of lives and property. But the work of promptly identifying and documenting the hurricane’s effects on contract schedules and costs must not be forgotten or ignored, say attorneys with Thompson Hine LLP.

  • Calif.'s New Rules For Lawyers Move Closer To ABA Model

    Mark Loeterman

    The first comprehensive overhaul of California's Rules of Professional Conduct in nearly 30 years becomes operational on Nov. 1. Some of the new rules mirror the model language used by the American Bar Association, but many continue to reflect California’s unique approach to certain ethical questions, says Mark Loeterman of Signature Resolution LLC.

  • Know The Limits To Atty Public Statements During A Trial

    Matthew Giardina

    The balancing act between protecting attorneys’ speech rights and ensuring unbiased adjudications was highlighted recently in two cases — when Michael Cohen applied for a restraining order against Stephanie Clifford's attorney, and when Johnson & Johnson questioned whether a Missouri talc verdict was tainted by public statements from the plaintiffs' counsel, says Matthew Giardina of Manning Gross & Massenburg LLP.

  • In Calif., Questions Remain On Law Firm Conflict Waivers

    Richard Rosensweig

    In Sheppard Mullin v. J-M Manufacturing Co., the California Supreme Court ruled last month that a law firm's failure to disclose a known conflict with another current client did not categorically disentitle the firm from recovering fees. But the court didn’t provide hoped-for guidance on how to write an enforceable advance conflict waiver, says Richard Rosensweig of Goulston & Storrs PC.

  • Q&A

    A Chat With Faegre Client Development Chief Melanie Green

    Melanie Green

    In this monthly series, Amanda Brady of Major Lindsey & Africa interviews management from top law firms about the increasingly competitive business environment. Here we feature Melanie Green, chief client development officer at Faegre Baker Daniels LLP.

  • How DOD Plans To Change Commercial Item Contracting

    Justin Ganderson

    The U.S. Department of Defense recently issued a proposed rule on the acquisition of commercial items, including commercially available off-the-shelf items. Many commercial item contractors and subcontractors will welcome the stated premise — less government contracting requirements for commercial items, say attorneys with Covington & Burling LLP.