Government Contracts

  • December 05, 2022

    Ariz. Tribal Hospital, IHS Want Mediation In Funding Dispute

    A federal judge has canceled the upcoming proceedings in litigation accusing the Indian Health Service of illegally withholding millions of dollars from a Navajo Nation hospital, after the parties agreed to try resolving their dispute, implicating more than $47 million, via mediation.

  • December 05, 2022

    In Law Firm Race For Revenue, Top Dogs Stand Alone

    Inflation, hand-wringing over the economy and even a possible recession will do little to close the widening revenue gap between a handful of legal giants grossing billions each year and other law firms, with longtime market consolidation only solidifying their dominance as BigLaw braces for a downturn.

  • December 05, 2022

    The 2022 Law360 Pulse Prestige Leaders

    Check out our Prestige Leaders ranking, analysis and interactive graphics to see which firms stand out for their financial performance, attractiveness to attorneys, ability to secure accolades and positive legal news media representation.

  • December 02, 2022

    Embattled Ex-Vitol Oil Trader Hit With More FCPA Charges

    Prosecutors filed new Foreign Corrupt Practices Act charges on Friday against a former Vitol Group oil trader who's accused of funneling bribes to Petroecuador officials to secure a $300 million fuel contract, claiming he engaged in similar crimes with Mexican officials as well.

  • December 02, 2022

    DHS Cyber Review Board To Probe Lapsus$ Extortion Crew

    A review board made up of U.S. Department of Homeland Security officials and private-sector cybersecurity experts said Friday that it will investigate a set of high-profile hacks attributed to a global cybercrime gang known as Lapsus$ and release advice on how to deal with the group's extortion tactics.

  • December 02, 2022

    ABB To Pay $327M To End S. Africa Power Plant Bribery Probe

    Swiss industrial giant ABB Ltd. has agreed to pay $327 million to end probes from U.S., South African and Swiss authorities into claims that it bribed a high-ranking official at the South Africa-owned energy company Eskom Holdings Ltd. in order to land contracts for multiple projects.

  • December 02, 2022

    Nigeria Seeks Contempt In $10B Award Fight As Trial Looms

    Nigeria on Friday asked a court to hold VR Advisory Services Ltd. in contempt for ignoring a discovery order, calling out the asset manager for its "outrageous" conduct as the country gears up for a high stakes trial in England to set aside an allegedly fraudulent $10 billion arbitral award.

  • December 02, 2022

    Ex-Navy Officer Gets 5 Years For Bribery Scheme

    A former U.S. Navy master sergeant was sentenced to five years in prison Friday after being convicted of steering contract work to a South Korean business in exchange for bribes.

  • December 02, 2022

    CDC Wants Cancellation Of $100M 9/11 Health Program Deal

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has told the U.S. Court of Federal Claims that it still wants to cancel and resolicit a $100 million contract for administering a 9/11-related health plan despite a protest, citing clear problems with the original deal.

  • December 02, 2022

    Ex-FBI, DOJ Atty Rejoins King & Spalding As Partner

    King & Spalding LLP has rehired a former firm attorney who most recently held several senior roles at both the Federal Bureau of Investigation and the U.S. Department of Justice.

  • December 02, 2022

    Booz Allen Beats 401(k) Mismanagement Suit, For Now

    A Virginia federal judge tossed a suit alleging Booz Allen Hamilton funneled employees' retirement savings into poorly performing investment funds, following pushback from the company that the proposed class action lacked convincing evidence of fiduciary malpractice.

  • December 01, 2022

    Claims Court Says USPS Must Revisit Dog Detection Deal

    The U.S. Postal Service must disqualify a former awardee from a disputed canine explosives detection contract and reevaluate the deal to address inherent conflicts of interest, a Court of Federal Claims judge has ruled.

  • December 01, 2022

    GAO Backs Peraton's $76M Cybersecurity Support Contract

    The U.S. Government Accountability Office has denied a software company's challenge of a Navy cybersecurity engineering support contract awarded to Peraton Inc. saying it had no reason to question the Navy's reasonableness in evaluating the challenging contractor's "technically unacceptable" proposal.

  • December 01, 2022

    $31M Construction Fight Belongs In Guatemala, Court Hears

    Guatemala on Wednesday urged a D.C. court to toss litigation to enforce $31 million in arbitral awards that arose from unpaid public works contracts, saying the litigation is a "brazen" effort by a construction and engineering firm to get around the country's public finance laws.

  • December 01, 2022

    Air Force Says It Reasonably Nixed Pricy Bids For $329M Deal

    The U.S. Air Force stood by a decision to cut two companies from competition for a $329 million network support deal, saying it reasonably chose not to evaluate their high-priced proposals in favor of trying to fix lesser-priced bids. 

  • December 01, 2022

    DOD Says It Didn't Award Secret $1.8M Anti-Drone Tech Deal

    The U.S. Department of Defense has asked the Court of Federal Claims to toss a suit alleging it unlawfully awarded a $1.8 million anti-drone technology contract without competition, saying the disputed deal was not a direct contract with the DOD.

  • November 30, 2022

    Ex-Treasurer Testifies He Betrayed Hugo Chavez For Money

    Ex-Venezuelan official Alejandro Andrade testified Wednesday in Florida federal court that he was loyal to former President Hugo Chavez, but went against the leader's policy wishes when Andrade started doing highly lucrative currency swaps with wealthy businessmen after his treasurer appointment, the same type of deals that continued when Claudia Diaz Guillen took his position less than a year later.

  • November 30, 2022

    CDC Broke Gilead HIV Research Deal, Claims Court Rules

    The U.S. Court of Federal Claims on Wednesday unsealed its ruling finding that the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention violated research agreements with Gilead Sciences by failing to notify the drugmaker about patents the agency had filed to cover HIV treatments.

  • November 30, 2022

    El Salvador News Site Sues NSO Group For Journalist Hacks

    At least 15 journalists at a prominent Salvadoran news outlet had their iPhones hacked using spyware sold by Israeli security company NSO Group, jeopardizing their safety by exposing their locations and text messages, a lawsuit filed Wednesday in California federal court says.

  • November 30, 2022

    Gov't Finalizes Rule To Improve Discussions With Industry

    The Federal Acquisition Regulatory Council on Wednesday finalized a long-pending rule clarifying that federal acquisition staff are both allowed and encouraged to communicate with industry, as long as they remain fair to everyone.

  • November 30, 2022

    Broker Wants 4th Circ. Rehearing For Satellite Deal Dispute

    A broker alleging Airbus, Lockheed Martin Corp. and South Korea cut it out of a $3.1 billion military satellite transaction has asked the Fourth Circuit for a rehearing, arguing that the appeals court wrongly assumed the U.S. government controlled or supervised the deal.

  • November 30, 2022

    Feds Hit Jackson, Miss., With Suit Over Contaminated Water

    The U.S. Department of Justice filed a lawsuit Tuesday claiming that Jackson, Mississippi, is still not providing clean, safe drinking water for its residents and followed that up with a same-day proposal that would appoint an interim third-party manager to oversee the city's water system.

  • November 30, 2022

    Gov't Contracts Of The Month: Blue Origin, SpaceX, Internet

    Space projects dominated government procurements in November, with NASA spending another $1.15 billion to advance its Artemis III moon-landing project, the Pentagon signing a deal that will keep Blue Origin in contention for national security space launches and four companies being retained to enable internet communications in space.

  • November 30, 2022

    Claims Court Can't Hear Solenex Oil Lease Case

    A judge has ruled that the U.S. Court of Federal Claims can't hear a case regarding a decadeslong legal battle over a Montana oil lease while litigation over the same issue is pending in another federal court.

  • November 30, 2022

    EU Eyes Using Frozen Russian Assets To Rebuild Ukraine

    Europe is considering a plan to invest €319 billion ($331 billion) of frozen Russian assets to help pay for the damage caused by the country's invasion of Ukraine, the European Commission disclosed on Wednesday.

Expert Analysis

  • 3 Pricing Trends In Law Firm Use Of Litigation Funding

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    As BigLaw firms increasingly include litigation funding as a financing option for clients, internal pricing groups are taking the lead on standardizing and centralizing firm processes, and aggregating risk budgets, says Brendan Dyer at Woodsford Group.

  • Safeguarding Attorneys' Greatest Asset: Our Mental Health

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    Attorneys who understand that mental fitness is their most valuable characteristic should prioritize mental health care accordingly, including with certain activities they may not realize qualify as self-care, says Wendy Robbins at Holland & Knight.

  • How 6th Circ. Flint Ruling Adds To 5th Amendment Case Law

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    The Sixth Circuit’s recent decision in Walters v. Snyder, holding that witnesses can testify at deposition but later invoke their right against self-incrimination at trial in the same case, is significant and long overdue in Fifth Amendment jurisprudence — but its practical effect is limited in parallel proceedings, say Ronald Blum and Rebecca Kimmel at Manatt.

  • New Human Trafficking Mandate Raises Contractor Risk

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    A new law that requires agency heads to report human trafficking activity increases government contractors' risk of suspension and debarment, so it's essential that contractors train employees and agents to whom it may not be obvious what trafficking entails, say Marcia Madsen and Cameron Edlefsen at Mayer Brown.

  • The DOJ Procurement Collusion Strike Force's Latest Steps

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    The Procurement Collusion Strike Force's recent expansion of its network of partner agencies is a further indication of the U.S. Justice Department's ongoing commitment to root out and expose anti-competitive behavior in government contracting, and bidders should expect greater scrutiny, say attorneys at Fried Frank.

  • Ex-Bolivia Official's Plea Shows DOJ's Shifting FCPA Posture

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    Recent cases, including a former Bolivian government minister’s recent guilty plea involving Foreign Corrupt Practices Act violations, demonstrate that the U.S. Department of Justice is increasingly targeting foreign government officials and becoming more aggressive in its international anti-corruption enforcement efforts, say Mayling Blanco and Katey Fardelmann at Norton Rose.

  • Opinion

    Law Schools Are Right To Steer Clear Of US News Rankings

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    By opting out of participating in the U.S. News & World Report annual rankings, law schools abandon a profoundly flawed system and free up their resources to adapt to the tsunami of changes overtaking the profession, says Nicholas Allard at Jacksonville University College of Law.

  • Cyber Risk Should Rocket To Top Of Space Sector's Priorities

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    The ease with which security experts have been able to hack into orbiting satellites and the absence of laws to determine liability for space collisions illustrate the need for private sector technologists to educate policymakers and help shape an updated regulatory framework that can keep up with the rapid commercialization of space, says John Bennett at Kroll.

  • Opinion

    Litigation Funders Seek Transparency In Disclosure Debate

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    Litigation funders want to correct the record on calls for funding disclosure in the name of transparency, as this purported justification obscures the disclosure's adverse effects — prejudicing plaintiffs' cases and discouraging the assertion of meritorious legal claims, say Dai Wai Chin Feman and William Weisman at Parabellum Capital.

  • NDAA Bills Would Tighten Sourcing Rules For Defense Cos.

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    The House and Senate versions of the National Defense Authorization Act for fiscal year 2023 each reflect the current era of technological competition between nations — so companies can expect that new sourcing requirements will be an increasingly significant and costly aspect of defense contracting, say Joseph Berger at Thompson Hine.

  • 5 Principles For Better Professional Development Programs

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    The pandemic and ensuing "great resignation" have resulted in a more transient legal work force, but law firms can use effective professional development programs to bridge a cultural gap with new associates and stem associate attrition, says Matthew Woods at Robins Kaplan.

  • Series

    My Favorite Law Prof: How I Learned To Practice With Passion

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    First Circuit Judge Gustavo Gelpí recalls how Suffolk University Law School's Joseph Glannon taught the importance of the law as both a tool and a profession, and that those who wish to practice law successfully must do so with love, enthusiasm and passion.

  • Justices May Cabin Theory Of Fraud In 'Buffalo Billion' Case

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    The U.S. Supreme Court will soon hear oral arguments in Ciminelli v. U.S. involving bid-rigging in a New York economic development project, and given the justices’ recent efforts to pare back the reach of criminal statutes, the right-to-control theory of fraud's days may be numbered, say Brook Dooley and Cody Gray at Keker Van Nest.

  • Moderna Ruling Misses On 'Products Sold To US Government'

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    A Delaware federal court’s refusal to dismiss patent infringement claims against Moderna, which manufactured patented COVID-19 vaccines under a government procurement contract, creates uncertainty for government contractors by misinterpreting a federal law intended to protect them, says Tyler Evans at Steptoe & Johnson.

  • What New Data On FCA Enforcement Tells Us

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    Attorneys at Kramer Levin take a deep dive into False Claims Act litigation data beyond the U.S. Department of Justice’s annual statistics, revealing enforcement trends that emerged from the early days of the Trump administration through the first eight months of Biden's term.

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