We use cookies on this site to enable your digital experience. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our cookie policy. close

Government Contracts

  • October 19, 2018

    Billions In Saudi Arms Sales At Stake Amid Lawmaker Furor

    Growing condemnation of Saudi Arabia stemming from its alleged killing of a journalist could see Congress exercise its authority over foreign military sales to cut off billions of dollars in military trade with the Middle Eastern kingdom, setting up a potentially significant clash with President Donald Trump.

  • October 19, 2018

    Fla. Pharmacy Hit With False Claims Suit Over Kickbacks

    The federal government has filed suit against a Florida pharmacy, alleging the business engaged in illegal kickback schemes with marketers that resulted in the federal Tricare program paying more than $21 million in reimbursements for prescriptions induced in violation of the False Claims Act.

  • October 19, 2018

    Political Consultant Cops To Bid-Rigging DOE Contracts

    A Bay Area political consultant pled guilty to conspiracy to defraud the United States as part of a bid-rigging scheme connected to a U.S. Department of Energy construction contract and making false statements to investigators, the U.S. Attorney's Office has said.

  • October 19, 2018

    Ukraine Asks DC Circ. To Stifle Tatneft's $112M Award Pursuit

    Ukraine has continued pressing the D.C. Circuit to scrap an order enforcing a $112 million arbitral award against the country for seizing an oil refinery from Russian energy company PAO Tatneft, arguing the energy company is a state-controlled entity and therefore Ukraine is immune to its claims.

  • October 19, 2018

    NY Top Court Nixes 'Soft Cap' On Contractor Health Exec Pay

    A majority of New York state’s highest court has agreed that a portion of the state Department of Health's restriction on how much certain health care executives of providers contracting with the state can get paid went beyond the state’s authority.

  • October 18, 2018

    Trump Had FBI Drop HQ Move To Protect His Hotel, Dems Say

    Newly unveiled emails show that President Donald Trump had direct influence over the U.S. General Services Administration's decision to abandon a plan to relocate FBI headquarters, senior House Democrats said Thursday, a decision they said was intended to protect his interest in the nearby Trump International Hotel.

  • October 18, 2018

    NY High Court Defers To DOL On Apprentice Wages

    New York’s high court on Thursday sided with the state’s Department of Labor in a suit over apprentice wages on public-work projects, ruling that the agency properly reasoned that apprentices not performing the tasks of their trade must be paid higher wages.

  • October 18, 2018

    Spanish Co. Seeks OK Of $2B Egypt Natural Gas Plant Award

    A Spanish natural gas company has sought enforcement from a D.C. federal court of its approximately $2 billion award against Egypt, issued after an international tribunal concluded the country was responsible for cutting off the gas supply to liquefaction facilities the company operated.

  • October 18, 2018

    LabMD Exec Sees FCA Suit Against Tiversa Trimmed

    A New York federal judge has trimmed a False Claims Act suit brought by the president of LabMD accusing cybersecurity firm Tiversa of fabricating data breaches to secure government contracts, concluding that the executive sufficiently alleged fraud for some claims, but that others don’t hold up.

  • October 18, 2018

    Enviros Sue Trump Admin. Over Border Wall Exemptions

    A coalition of environmental groups filed suit in D.C. federal court on Thursday against the U.S. Department of Homeland Security accusing it of improperly waiving a slew of laws and environmental protections so it can build 24.6 miles of border wall in two counties in Texas.

  • October 17, 2018

    Vectrus Wraps Up Wage Class Action With $3.75M Deal

    A Washington federal judge has given final approval to a deal where Vectrus Systems Corp. agreed to pay $3.75 million to settle a class action that had accused a former version of the company of withholding pay and benefits promised to a group of people hired to work in Kuwait.

  • October 17, 2018

    A High Court Milestone Stirs Hope Of Gender Parity

    After an emotionally fraught confirmation process with sexual misconduct allegations front and center, a new justice joins the Supreme Court bench and brings four female clerks with him. The hires bring gender parity to the court's clerkship ranks for the first time, but will the shift be long-lasting?

  • October 17, 2018

    11th Circ. Says FCA Relator Barred From Forfeiture Case

    Criminal forfeiture law prevents False Claims Act whistleblowers from intervening in related forfeiture proceedings when the government chooses prosecution over intervening in a related FCA case, the Eleventh Circuit ruled Wednesday.

  • October 17, 2018

    Vet-Owned Biz Is Always VA Contract Priority, Fed. Circ. Says

    A requirement for the U.S. Department of Veteran Affairs to give preference to veteran-owned small businesses in contracting overrides an otherwise mandatory government-wide contracting preference for items made by the blind and significantly disabled, the Federal Circuit ruled Wednesday.

  • October 17, 2018

    7th Circ. Upholds Conviction For Doc Who Ripped Off Insurers

    The Seventh Circuit on Wednesday said there’s “ample evidence” to support a jury’s finding that a Chicago dermatologist committed fraud by passing off cosmetic procedures as pre-cancer treatment to insurance companies.

  • October 17, 2018

    Bayer Cholesterol Drug FCA Suit Survives Dismissal Bid

    A Minnesota federal court judge has kept alive a long-running False Claims Act suit alleging that Bayer AG misled the U.S. Department of Defense about the risks of its now-defunct cholesterol drug Baycol, finding that the relator had presented enough evidence to show that she had direct knowledge of the alleged fraud.

  • October 17, 2018

    Mass. MD Says FCA Case Over Surgeries Should Advance

    A former anesthesiologist at Massachusetts General Hospital defended her second shot at a False Claims Act suit Tuesday, saying a federal court should hear the case because she has now provided evidence to show the hospital may have overbilled Medicare and Medicaid for time patients spent in surgery without a teaching physician in the room.

  • October 17, 2018

    Sultzer Law Adds 2 Class Action Pros From Wolf Haldenstein

    The Sultzer Law Group has nabbed two Wolf Haldenstein Adler Freeman & Herz LLP partners to bolster its New York City offerings with their extensive experience litigating class actions in areas such as product liability, cybersecurity and privacy, antitrust, employment and securities, the firm said Tuesday.

  • October 16, 2018

    Energy Exec Who Hired Percoco's Wife Gets 14 Months

    Energy executive Peter Galbraith Kelly Jr., who struck a plea deal after a jury split on charges that he bribed Joseph Percoco by giving his wife a "low-show" job, was sentenced to 14 months behind bars on Tuesday in a decision meant to send a warning to lobbyists across the country.

  • October 16, 2018

    FBI To Restrict Competition On Pending $5B IT Contract

    The FBI has turned away from full competition for its pending $5 billion information technology services contract, saying it will instead look to vendors who already hold supply agreements under an existing broad federal IT deal.

Expert Analysis

  • Need Litigation Finance? Don't Skip These 5 Steps

    Molly Pease

    The process of applying for litigation financing isn’t difficult, but few do it right the first time. Following five steps in your application process will help make sure litigation funders are convinced of the value of your company's legal claims, says Molly Pease of Curiam Capital LLC.

  • To What Extent Can CMS Informally Issue Interpretive Rules?

    Robert Wanerman

    The U.S. Supreme Court recently agreed to review the D.C. Circuit's decision in Allina Health Services v. Azar, which has the potential to resolve the issue of whether or not the Medicare Act requires notice-and-comment rule-making in more situations than are required by the Administrative Procedure Act, says Robert Wanerman of Epstein Becker Green.

  • A Holistic Approach To Client Retention

    Dan Tacone

    In an era when law firms are fighting for business and clients can dictate the terms of the relationship, "value" has become a moving target. Firms that take a proactive approach by using strategies designed to articulate value over time will gain the competitive advantage, says Dan Tacone at Intapp Inc.

  • Q&A

    A Chat With Allens Pricing Chief Pier D'Angelo

    Pier D'Angelo

    In this monthly series, Amanda Brady of Major Lindsey & Africa interviews management from top law firms about the increasingly competitive business environment. Here we feature Pier D'Angelo, chief pricing and practice officer at Allens.

  • Industry Takeaways From The Defense Industrial Base Report

    Zach Mears

    While the long-awaited interagency assessment of the U.S. manufacturing and defense industrial base does not incorporate detailed policy solutions, it does identify current actions and potential future efforts and recommendations. Attorneys with Covington & Burling LLP draw some initial conclusions.

  • Opinion

    The ABA Was Dead Wrong About Model Rule 8.4(g)

    Bradley Abramson

    In the two years since the American Bar Association's controversial anti-discrimination and harassment rule, only one state has adopted it, while numerous state supreme courts, state attorneys general and legal groups have correctly rejected Model Rule 8.4(g) as a threat to lawyers' First Amendment rights, says Bradley Abramson, an attorney with Alliance Defending Freedom.

  • Opinion

    The Supreme Court Should Become Boring

    Alexander Klein

    In the aftermath of Justice Brett Kavanaugh's confirmation, the U.S. Supreme Court should decline review of the nation's most polarizing political questions unless and until the questions become time-sensitive, says Alexander Klein, head of the commercial litigation group at Barket Epstein Kearon Aldea & LoTurco LLP.

  • Q&A

    Back To School: BC's Kent Greenfield Talks Corporate Law

    Kent Greenfield

    In this series featuring law school luminaries, Boston College Law School professor Kent Greenfield reflects on his corporate law theories, his legal battle with the Pentagon over free speech and gay rights, and important constitutional law issues to watch out for.

  • 10 Years Of Inaction On US-Flag Cargo Preference

    Jeff Vogel

    The 2009 National Defense Authorization Act granted the U.S. Maritime Administration increased authority to enforce the requirement that at least half of government-impelled cargoes be carried on U.S.-flag vessels. But in the intervening decade, regulatory efforts toward this goal have failed. If Congress wishes to preserve the U.S.-flag fleet, it must take further action, says Jeff Vogel of Cozen O’Connor.

  • Inside The Petrobras FCPA Resolution

    Gayle Littleton

    The Operation Car Wash investigation that began in 2008 brought down numerous Brazilian politicians and Petrobras officials and led to one of the largest Foreign Corrupt Practices Act settlements last month. The resolution highlights the myriad ways in which Petrobras failed to implement a robust anti-corruption compliance program, say attorneys with Jenner & Block LLP.