Government Contracts

  • November 24, 2021

    NSO Wants 9th Circ. To Revisit Refusal To Ax WhatsApp Row

    Israeli spyware maker NSO Group is urging the Ninth Circuit to review a panel ruling that refused to grant it immunity for claims that it hacked into the phones of 1,400 WhatsApp users, arguing that it shouldn't be held liable for how foreign states use its software. 

  • November 24, 2021

    3 Key Details To Watch As Congress Mulls Breach Report Law

    Congress is on the verge of passing legislation requiring certain companies to disclose cyberattacks and ransomware payouts, but unresolved details, such as the deadline for reporting incidents, bear watching as lawmakers bid to pass a bill before the end of the year.

  • November 24, 2021

    Ill. Businessman Says He's Innocent Of VA Kickback Scheme

    An Illinois businessman has pled not guilty to federal fraud charges over an alleged kickback scheme in which he paid a U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs employee to rent his company's medical equipment at higher prices instead of purchasing it as directed.

  • November 24, 2021

    Djibouti Says Bid For $486M Award Imperils Sovereign Rights

    The Republic of Djibouti told a federal judge that U.S. federal courts have no jurisdiction to enforce a $486 million arbitration award over a terminated deep-water port venture, arguing that the enforcement petition threatens the nation's right to control its territory and national resources.

  • November 24, 2021

    AILA Alleges Mistreatment Of Haitian Migrants At NM Facility

    The American Immigration Lawyers Association has issued a call to action seeking the release of eligible Haitian migrants being held at a New Mexico private prison, claiming U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement officials and facility staff are denying the migrants due process, medical attention and safe conditions.

  • November 24, 2021

    Fight To Enforce $22M Nigeria Award To Go To High Court

    The U.S. Supreme Court will be asked to review a Fifth Circuit decision nixing a former Enron subsidiary's claim to funds allegedly tied to a massive Nigerian corruption scandal as it looks to enforce a nearly decade-old $22 million arbitral award against the country.

  • November 24, 2021

    Ex-Mass. Mayor Wins Prison Delay Until After Holidays

    A former Massachusetts mayor convicted on fraud and corruption charges can delay his six-year prison sentence, a Boston federal judge ruled Wednesday, granting the disgraced politician's request for more time to help family over the holidays and assist his attorneys on his appeals.

  • November 23, 2021

    Jury Awards $730M To Kin Of Driver Killed In Wide-Load Crash

    A Texas state jury has awarded $730 million to the family of a 73-year-old woman who was killed when the top of her car was ripped off by a submarine propeller being hauled by an overloaded tractor-trailer, finding the transporters were negligent while carrying the wide-load cargo and violated a duty of care owed to the septuagenarian.

  • November 23, 2021

    Border Wall Campaign Urges Justices To Undo Asset Freeze

    A border wall fundraising campaign tied to former Trump adviser Steve Bannon urged the U.S. Supreme Court to unfreeze its bank accounts, saying the executives charged with defrauding donors never owned the accounts or the money held in them. 

  • November 23, 2021

    Rehab Joint Venture Is Kickback Minefield, Watchdog Says

    A U.S. Department of Health and Human Services watchdog said it likely would sanction a would-be deal between a therapy services contractor and a long-term care facilities owner, saying the proposed deal has "problematic" elements.

  • November 23, 2021

    IMF Warns Against El Salvador's Adoption Of Bitcoin

    El Salvador's recognition of Bitcoin as legal tender creates risks for consumer protection as well as the country's financial stability, and it should consider swift moves to narrow its law, the International Monetary Fund has warned in a statement.

  • November 23, 2021

    Medicare Fraud Exoneree Can't Seek Damages, 5th Circ. Says

    The formerly imprisoned owner of a defunct Louisiana home health care operator can't sue the federal government for damages after being exonerated of a $34 million Medicare fraud conviction, the Fifth Circuit held Monday.

  • November 22, 2021

    Mass. Navy Contractor Pays $3.5M To Duck Feds' Civil Claims

    Charles Stark Draper Laboratory Inc. will pay $3.5 million to stave off civil allegations that the Cambridge, Massachusetts-based government contractor overcharged the U.S. Navy in 2016, Boston's federal law enforcement office announced Monday.

  • November 22, 2021

    Biz Must Bargain With Disabled Janitors, NLRB Tells 4th Circ.

    The National Labor Relations Board urged the Fourth Circuit on Monday to enforce its ruling that a government contractor must bargain with a unit made up mostly of disabled janitors, disputing the company's claim that the workers are job trainees rather than employees.

  • November 22, 2021

    Chile Power Plant Cleared To Tap $20M Del. Ch. 11 Loan

    Bankrupt Chilean hydroelectric venture Alto Maipo SpA secured a Delaware judge's approval Monday for interim access to as much as $20 million of a $50 million debtor-in-possession loan earmarked for the $2.5 billion water-power project threatened by dwindling Andes stream flows.

  • November 22, 2021

    Fla. Can't Block Federal Health Care Staff Vaccine Mandate

    A federal judge on Saturday denied the state of Florida its bid to block an interim final rule of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services mandating COVID-19 vaccinations for all covered health care staff after finding that the state has not shown it will suffer irreparable harm if the rule is implemented.

  • November 22, 2021

    NY Homeless Nonprofit Executive Cops To Stealing $2.4M

    The operator of a New York homeless shelter copped to raiding nearly $2.4 million from the nonprofit's coffers and failing to pay taxes on it while she and her family lived in the lap of luxury, state Attorney General Letitia James announced Monday.

  • November 22, 2021

    DOD Invites 4 Cos. To Bid On New JEDI Deal

    The U.S. Department of Defense has invited four companies to bid for the new multibillion-dollar deal replacing its hotly litigated, and now-canceled, JEDI contract.

  • November 22, 2021

    DOL Finalizes Fed. Contractor $15 Minimum Wage

    The U.S. Department of Labor on Monday finalized a rule to raise the minimum wage for federal contract workers to $15 an hour, implementing an executive order by President Joe Biden that will impact hundreds of thousands of workers.

  • November 19, 2021

    2nd Circ. Revives Fraud Billing Claim In $1.9B Army Deal Suit

    The Second Circuit partially revived a whistleblower's suit alleging AECOM breached a $1.9 billion maintenance deal with the U.S. Army, finding Friday that the lower court shouldn't have considered an external document when tossing accusations of false billing practices.

  • November 19, 2021

    Investors Move To Seize India's US Assets In $1.3B Fight

    Investors in a satellite communications company have urged a federal judge to issue an order allowing them to register a $1.29 billion award enforcement nationwide, so they can begin seizing the U.S. assets of India's state-owned space corporation.

  • November 19, 2021

    FDA, CDC Panel Clear COVID Boosters For All Adults

    Federal health officials on Friday opened the gates for American adults to get COVID-19 booster shots if they received the initial double-dose of the Pfizer-BioNTech or Moderna vaccinations in the past half-year.

  • November 19, 2021

    Mass. AG Targets 2 Home Health Cos. In Fraud Crackdown

    Massachusetts Attorney General Maura Healey announced Friday a pair of actions in her crackdown on Medicaid fraud, inking a $1.2 million settlement with a home health group and filing new claims against another agency for allegedly billing for services without a doctor's signoff.

  • November 19, 2021

    Senate Confirms 7 US Atty Picks In 5 States

    The Senate confirmed seven U.S. attorney nominees by voice vote Friday for districts in Arizona, Colorado, North Carolina, Ohio and Pennsylvania, including partners at Hogan Lovells and McGuireWoods LLP.

  • November 19, 2021

    Senate Approves NATO Ambassador After Hawley Lifts Hold

    The Senate on Thursday confirmed Julianne Smith to be U.S. ambassador to NATO after Sen. Josh Hawley, R-Mo., lifted his hold on her nomination following Smith's assurances that she would urge NATO members to increase their goal for defense spending.

Expert Analysis

  • A Real-World Guide To Staying Discovery In Federal Court

    Author Photo

    Pleas for stay of discovery under the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure are often rejected when motions to dismiss are pending due to a tenacious tangle of case law, imposing financial and administrative burdens on parties, but some unambiguous rules of thumb can be gleaned to maximize the chances of a discovery stay, says Amir Shachmurove at Reed Smith.

  • Thoughts On Gov't Innovation In Suspension And Debarment

    Author Photo

    Amid a steady drop in suspension and debarment activity in recent years, Derek Santos, deputy general counsel at the U.S. Department of the Air Force, offers his perspective on how agencies can further the goal of transacting with responsible contractors by leveraging data analytics, the expertise of the private bar and other innovations.

  • A Software Primer For Attorneys After Cyber Executive Order

    Author Photo

    President Joe Biden's executive order to improve the nation's cybersecurity has set in motion a number of prospective changes for the software community that will require lawyers to become better versed in secure software development issues and best practices for related due diligence, say Alan Charles Raul and Stephen McInerney at Sidley.

  • Record Award Shows Claims Court's Rising Role In IP Matters

    Author Photo

    The Court of Federal Claims' recent damages award of over $100 million in SecurityPoint Holdings v. U.S. — its largest-ever patent infringement award against the government — highlights the court's increasing importance in patent litigation, as well as its special jurisdiction requirements and fee standards, say Ranganath Sudarshan and Adam Mitchell at Covington.

  • How DOJ May Beat The White Collar Fraud Clock Post-COVID

    Author Photo

    The U.S. Department of Justice will likely employ creative strategies to try to sidestep the five-year statute of limitations in certain complex white collar matters following widespread delays due to the pandemic, but each method comes with nuances and weaknesses that may allow appropriate challenges from defense counsel, say Michael Harwin at Stearns Weaver and David Chaiken at ChaikenLaw.

  • Suspension and Debarment: FY 2021 By The Numbers

    Author Photo

    The System for Award Management's fiscal year 2021 suspension and debarment data depicts a staggering drop since 2020, with overall activity falling more than 60% since 2016, which might indicate the government data should include other factors worth measuring and discussing, say David Robbins and Sati Harutyunyan at Jenner & Block.

  • CMS Vaccine Rules Could Create FCA Risks For Cos.

    Author Photo

    The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services' interim final rule requiring COVID-19 vaccinations for participating health care providers creates a potential for not only direct enforcement but also qui tam lawsuits, though certain best practices can reduce the chance of litigation, say attorneys at Ropes & Gray.

  • How DOD's Climate Focus Will Affect Gov't Procurement

    Author Photo

    Attorneys at Arnold & Porter discuss effects of the Biden administration’s climate change policies on U.S. Department of Defense procurement, why government contractors should comment on related changes to the Federal Acquisition Regulation while they can, and risks and opportunities to watch for now that these policies are likely here to stay.

  • Heed These Rules, Or Risk Your Argument On Appeal

    Author Photo

    Failing to meet the scattered requirements for appellate preservation can have dire consequences, so litigants must understand the relevant briefing rules, the differences between waiver and forfeiture, and the four components of a pressed argument in order to get their case fully considered on appeal and avoid sanctions or dismissal, says Michael Soyfer at Quinn Emanuel.

  • What To Include In Orders Governing Remote Arbitration

    Author Photo

    When conducting remote arbitration, attorneys should negotiate written orders that spell out clear rules on technology accommodations, document handling, witness readiness and other key considerations to ensure parties' rights are protected and the neutral's time is not wasted, say Matthew Williams and Christina Sarchio at Dechert.

  • Series

    Embracing ESG: CBRE GC Talks Effective Compliance Emails

    Author Photo

    Good corporate governance requires communicating expectations for ethical conduct, but compliance emails need not be overly technical — a relatable story told in simple language with humility and respect can create internal communications that drive home the message, says Laurence Midler at CBRE.

  • GAO Ruling Instructs On Proposal Planning During M&As

    Author Photo

    The Government Accountability Office's recent denial of ICI Services Corporation's bid protest highlights the importance of proper planning to protect prime contract proposals during mergers and acquisitions, and other corporate transactions, say attorneys at Covington.

  • Bipartisan CFIUS Proposals Lack Cohesive Security Strategy

    Author Photo

    Although there is bipartisan support for expansion of the Committee on Foreign Investment in the United States' jurisdiction, diversity within the flurry of recent legislative proposals reflects a deeper struggle over the scope and kinds of economic security issues that should be treated as a matter of national security, says attorney Devin DeBacker.

  • The Hazards Of Female Lawyers Being 'Office Moms'

    Author Photo

    Female attorneys are frequently credited with being the "office moms" who do critical but undervalued work — from bringing birthday cakes to serving on diversity committees — but as lawyers return to offices, now is a good time for employers to rectify the gender imbalance that disadvantages women, say Ninth Circuit Judge Margaret McKeown and Fine Kaplan partner Roberta Liebenberg.

  • Discovery Immunity For Draft Expert Reports Lacks Clarity

    Author Photo

    Court rulings on whether — and when — drafts of expert reports are immune from discovery have been inconsistent, so the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure should be amended to better distinguish between draft and final expert reports, say attorneys at Lowenstein Sandler.

Want to publish in Law360?


Submit an idea
Hello! I'm Law360's automated support bot.

How can I help you today?

For example, you can type:
  • I forgot my password
  • I took a free trial but didn't get a verification email
  • How do I sign up for a newsletter?
Ask a question!