Health

  • December 11, 2017

    Convicted Pharmacist's Wife Wants To Keep Money, House

    The wife of a pharmacist convicted of racketeering and fraud related to a deadly 2012 meningitis outbreak has asked a Massachusetts federal court not to make her husband forfeit properties, a trust fund, multiple bank accounts and other assets, arguing they belong to her too.

  • December 11, 2017

    Noted Medical Malpractice Defense Atty Joins Dorf & Nelson

    A former Martin Clearwater & Bell LLP medical malpractice attorney has joined Dorf & Nelson LLP as a partner and will head its medical malpractice defense group in New York, the firm announced Monday.

  • December 11, 2017

    Deals Rumor Mill: Disney, Ascension Health, GGP

    A deal between Disney and 21st Century Fox could come this week, Ascension Health and Providence St. Joseph Health are in talks to merge, and GGP has declined Brookfield Property Partners LP’s $14.8 billion buyout bid.

  • December 11, 2017

    FDA Issues Final Guidance On Drug Names In Ads

    The U.S. Food and Drug Administration on Monday released final guidance laying out its recommendations for how product names are displayed on advertising and promotional labeling for prescription drugs, and proposed to study how consumers and health care providers spot deceptive ads.  

  • December 11, 2017

    Justices Won't Hear Appeal Of $8M Health Care Fraud Verdict

    The U.S. Supreme Court declined on Monday to hear an appeal brought by a medical diagnostics company owner sentenced to 10 years in prison after a jury found him guilty of Medicare and Medicaid fraud for billing $8 million for X-rays interpreted by amateurs, leading to the death of two patients.

  • December 11, 2017

    21st Century To Pay $28M Over Gov't FCA Claims, Data Breach

    21st Century Oncology on Monday got a New York bankruptcy court’s approval for two settlements totaling $28 million over U.S. government claims of Medicare overcharges and patient privacy breaches.

  • December 11, 2017

    NJ Board Revokes Doc's License For Prescription Abuse

    The New Jersey Board of Medical Examiners permanently revoked a Bergen County psychiatrist’s license after he was convicted of illicitly prescribing the stimulant Adderall, prosecutors announced on Friday.

  • December 11, 2017

    Kirkland Wins As Top Fees Earner In Caesars Ch. 11

    An Illinois bankruptcy court on Friday gave final approval to nearly $148 million in fees to various law firms and consultancies as part of Caesars Entertainment Operating Co. Inc.'s Chapter 11 process, awarding the largest amount — approximately $77 million — to Kirkland & Ellis LLP for guiding the casino giant through its reorganization.

  • December 8, 2017

    The Law Firms Of The 2017 MVPs

    Law360's MVP award goes to attorneys who have distinguished themselves from their peers in litigation, deals and other complex matters. Find the MVPs at your firm here.

  • December 8, 2017

    Law360 MVP Awards Go To Top Attorneys From 78 Firms

    The elite slate of attorneys chosen as Law360’s 2017 MVPs have distinguished themselves from their peers by securing hard-earned successes in high-stakes litigation, complex global matters and record-breaking deals.

  • December 8, 2017

    Texas Justices To Hear Challenge To $9.6M MedMal Verdict

    The Texas Supreme Court on Friday agreed to hear a case in which Obstetrical and Gynecological Associates and one of its doctors argue that there was legally insufficient evidence to support a $9.6 million jury award in favor of the husband of a woman who alleges the substandard care she received resulted in a brain injury.

  • December 8, 2017

    Cancer Center In Ch. 11 To Shell Out $26M In FCA Deal

    21st Century Oncology LLC has agreed to pay $26 million to settle allegations that it violated the False Claims Act and Stark Law by paying off physicians who referred patients, according to an agreement recently filed in New York bankruptcy court.

  • December 8, 2017

    Medicaid Scheme Lands NY Businessman 6-Year Sentence

    An Albany County Supreme Court justice slapped a New York transportation company’s owner with two to six years in prison for submitting over $50,000 worth of false Medicaid claims for transportation that never occurred, according to an announcement Friday from the state attorney general’s office.

  • December 8, 2017

    Pharma Group Sues Calif. Over Drug Pricing Law

    Trade group Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America on Friday sued California to block a newly approved drug pricing law, calling it a vast overreach that amounts to a “nationwide ban” on price increases.

  • December 8, 2017

    Veteran’s Sex-Assault Suit Against VA Staffer Moves Forward

    A Kansas federal judge on Thursday kept alive much of a veteran’s suit alleging a former physician’s assistant at a U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs hospital sexually assaulted him during medical examinations, but tossed his negligent hiring and retention claims.

  • December 8, 2017

    Katten Atty Says He Never Saw Greebel Break The Law

    A onetime colleague of former Katten Muchin corporate attorney and fraud defendant Evan Greebel who was retained to handle a U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission investigation into one of Martin Shkreli’s hedge funds told a Brooklyn federal jury on Friday that he never saw Greebel do anything illegal.

  • December 8, 2017

    No Extra $2.3M FICA Refund For Kansas Education Nonprofit

    A nonprofit will not receive at least $2.3 million in additional interest it had sought from the IRS for overpayment of Federal Insurance Contributions Act tax, after a Kansas federal judge ruled Thursday that the entity should be treated as a corporation.

  • December 8, 2017

    Taxation With Representation: Shearman, Sullivan, Wachtell

    In this week’s Taxation With Representation, CVS bought Aetna for $69 billion, UnitedHealth Group Inc. subsidiary Optum acquired Davita for $4.9 billion, Prysmian snapped up General Cable for $3 billion, and Hartford sold its life insurance business for $2.05 billion.

  • December 7, 2017

    Eye Doc Blasts Feds' Loss Calculations Before Sentencing

    Counsel for a politically connected Florida ophthalmologist convicted of overbilling Medicare by $32 million urged a district court to toss the government's loss calculations Thursday as the sides made final arguments before sentencing, suggesting prosecutors have met the burden of proof for only $64,000 in false claims.

  • December 7, 2017

    11th Circ. Won't Give LabMD 2nd Bite At Tiversa Fraud Row

    The Eleventh Circuit on Thursday refused to revive a computer hacking and trespass suit that LabMD filed against Tiversa in Georgia federal court as part of the parties' wide-ranging dispute over the exposure of a LabMD patient data file, agreeing with a lower court that there was no evidence that a Pepper Hamilton LLP partner who represented Tiversa intentionally deceived the court.

Expert Analysis

  • Preparing Your Company Witnesses For The Gotcha Question

    Matthew Keenan

    Catching a witness flat-footed on an important topic is no longer confined to cable news, and corporate legal defenses can likewise die when witnesses profess ignorance on things that jurors believe they should know. However, employing some common sense tools can minimize potential harm, says Matthew Keenan of Shook Hardy Bacon LLP.

  • Series

    Judging A Book: Saris Reviews 'Locking Up Our Own'

    Judge Patti Saris

    Having just completed a six-year term as chair of the U.S. Sentencing Commission, I read Yale Law School professor James Forman's new book, "Locking Up Our Own: Crime and Punishment in Black America," with particular interest, says Judge Patti Saris, chief judge for the U.S. District Court for the District of Massachusetts.

  • Series

    My Supreme Court Debut: 'Ladies' Day' At The High Court

    Sarah Weddington

    When I first argued Roe v. Wade before the U.S. Supreme Court, I was told I was believed to be the youngest person ever to argue there. I was 26, says Sarah Weddington, founder of the Weddington Center.

  • The Broad Reach Of Medicare Act’s Preemption Provision

    Jeffrey Bushofsky

    When defending claims involving Medicare, it is important to consider whether they may be preempted by state or local laws. An Illinois federal court's recent decision in Mayberry v. Walgreens highlights just how far Medicare preemption can reach, say attorneys with Ropes & Gray LLP.

  • Amarin Case Demonstrates Limits Of ITC Jurisdiction

    Matthew Rizzolo

    Last month, the U.S. International Trade Commission declined to institute a Section 337 investigation based on a complaint brought by Amarin Pharma Inc. This decision, departing from the ITC's typical practice, provides insight into the ITC's jurisdiction and deference to sister government agencies, say Matthew Rizzolo and Vladimir Semendyai of Ropes & Gray LLP.

  • Future MACRA Concerns For Hospitals And Health Systems

    Deborah Kantar Gardner

    In the process of reforming physician Medicare reimbursement Congress and the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services have created an interesting juncture in the health care landscape, as one of the real and lasting impacts of the Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act may well be the formation of new alignments between physicians and hospitals and health systems, say Deborah Kantar Gardner and Peter Holman at Ropes & Gray LLP.

  • Roundup

    Judging A Book

    Constance Baker Motley

    Are the latest books on the judicial system worth reading? Federal judges share their thoughts in this series of book reviews.

  • Don't Waste This Planning Cycle: Year-End Strategies

    Hugh A. Simons

    Law firms are businesses where partners operate with significant autonomy. To see their priorities translate into individual partner action, firm leaders should use a few collaborative strategies, suggests Hugh A. Simons, former senior partner of The Boston Consulting Group and former COO of Ropes & Gray LLP.

  • From Snaps To Tweets: The Craft Of Social Media Discovery

    Matthew Hamilton

    Courts have consistently held that social media accounts are subject to established discovery principles but are reluctant to allow parties to rummage through private social media accounts. Recent case law confirms that narrowly tailored information requests get the best results, say Matthew Hamilton, Donna Fisher and Jessica Bae of Pepper Hamilton LLP.

  • An Interview With Former DHS Secretary Jeh Johnson

    Randy Maniloff

    Jeh Johnson, the former secretary of homeland security, was kind enough to let me visit him to reflect on his diverse career. He told stories that left me speechless. And yes, the man who was responsible for the Transportation Security Administration removed his shoes when going through airport security. You bet I asked, says Randy Maniloff of White and Williams LLP.