Hospitality

  • December 7, 2017

    Firms Are Facing A Cash Crunch As Demand Falters

    Some law firms are feeling a squeeze on the cash they have available for investments in the future as demand for firms' services remains sluggish and partners continue to expect ever-rising profit payouts.

  • December 6, 2017

    Tribes Seek Seat At Table In Bridgeport Casino Talks

    Two tribes that own casinos in Connecticut and are seeking to open one together want to be part of any discussions about a possible Bridgeport gaming facility, they told state lawmakers in a letter Tuesday, amid buzz around MGM Resorts International’s plan to seek approval for a $675 million resort casino in the city.

  • December 6, 2017

    Hopi Tribe Inks Gaming Compact With State Of Arizona

    Hopi Tribe Chairman Herman G. Honanie on his last day in office signed an agreement with Republican Arizona Gov. Doug Ducey allowing the tribe to operate or lease up to 900 Class III gaming machines, according to the tribe.

  • December 6, 2017

    Bjarke Ingels Bringing First Pro Sports Stadium To Austin

    Architecture firm Bjarke Ingels Group is bringing the first ever professional sports stadium to Austin, Texas, which will be part of a massive 1.3 million-square-foot sports, music, entertainment and retail complex, according to an announcement from BIG on Tuesday.

  • December 6, 2017

    Animal Groups Ask 11th Circ. For Redo In Captive Orca Suit

    An Eleventh Circuit panel questioned animal rights groups at length Wednesday on what would be the fate of the Miami Seaquarium's captive orca, Lolita, if it grants their appeal for a new trial in their suit challenging her treatment and they were to prevail.

  • December 6, 2017

    Rent-A-Wreck Founder Questions Need For Bankruptcy Filing

    The founder of discount car rental franchise Rent-A-Wreck questioned the need of the company to seek Chapter 11 protection Wednesday in Delaware, saying company leadership has provided no financial information to show it is insolvent and needs to reorganize.

  • December 6, 2017

    Brands Are Turning Trademark Cease-And-Desists Into Ads

    Bud Light used an actor dressed as a medieval town crier last week to ask a Minnesota brewery to stop using the company’s trademarks, becoming the latest brand to transform a cease-and-desist into a marketing stunt.

  • December 6, 2017

    Tribes Want Burial Grounds Suit Paused For Deal Talks

    The Muscogee Creek Nation told an Alabama federal judge Tuesday that it is in talks with the Poarch Band of Creek Indians to settle a suit accusing the latter of obtaining sacred tribal burial grounds under false pretenses.

  • December 5, 2017

    Plan To Move Miami Tennis Tournament Hits Possible Snag

    IMG Worldwide Inc. on Tuesday appeared poised to score a win for a long-term deal to move its Miami Open tennis tournament to the Miami Dolphins' stadium, but a last-minute change by the county before approving two needed agreements had the company questioning if the plan will clear the net.

  • December 5, 2017

    Rent-A-Wreck Defends Ch. 11 Strategy Against Dismissal Bid

    Budget rental car company Rent-A-Wreck defended its bankruptcy filing and restructuring strategy Tuesday in Delaware from an attack by the company’s founder, who said the insolvency proceeding is merely a way for the company to avoid paying a court-ordered judgment to him.

  • December 5, 2017

    Wis. Tribe Seeks Quick Win In Gambling Compact Spat

    The Forest County Potawatomi Community on Monday asked a D.C. federal judge to vacate a Bureau of Indian Affairs decision rejecting an amendment to the tribe’s state gambling compact, arguing that the ruling was based largely on the incorrect conclusion that the proposal imposed payment obligations on a rival tribe.

  • December 5, 2017

    Texas Roadhouse Ends TM Beef With Rival Restaurant

    Texas Roadhouse Inc. and Texas Corral Restaurants Inc. have agreed to end Roadhouse's trademark infringement suit over a logo featuring a map of the state of Texas wearing a cowboy hat, according to documents filed in Indiana federal court Tuesday, with both parties agreeing to bear their own costs.

  • December 5, 2017

    Sonic Seeks To Roll Out Of Customer's Data Breach Suit

    Fast-food restaurant chain Sonic Drive-In’s operating company asked an Oklahoma federal court on Monday to toss a lawsuit stemming from a customer data breach confirmed in September, arguing the lead plaintiff in the proposed class action had failed to show "cognizable injury."

  • December 5, 2017

    Morgan Lewis May Face DQ Over 'Sticky' Conflict In Wage Suit

    A California federal judge said Tuesday he’s considering disqualifying Morgan Lewis & Bockius LLP from representing Interstate Hotels & Resorts Inc. in a wage suit after three potential class members testified that the firm represented both them and Interstate during their depositions, creating a conflict the judge called “a sticky mess.”

  • December 5, 2017

    Landry's Finds Flaws In ESA Lawsuit Over Tigers' Treatment

    The Houston Aquarium restaurant and its parent company, Landry's Inc., urged a Texas federal judge on Monday to throw out an Endangered Species Act lawsuit over the treatment of four tigers on display at the downtown restaurant, saying the Aquarium is a highly regulated facility that provides humane care for its animals.

  • December 5, 2017

    Swing Vote Kennedy Conflicted In Masterpiece Cakeshop Case

    In a major case over whether a Christian baker can refuse to make a custom wedding cake for a same-sex couple, U.S. Supreme Court Justice Anthony Kennedy, who is expected to cast the deciding vote, appeared torn between supporting religious liberty and LGBT rights during oral arguments Tuesday.

  • December 4, 2017

    Real Estate Rumors: Feil, Denihan Hospitality, Omnicom

    Feil Organization has reportedly bought a New York property leased to multiple fitness studios from Acadia Realty Trust for $27 million, Denihan Hospitality is said to be seeking $80 million for a Chicago hotel, and advertising firm Omnicom has reportedly extended its lease for 200,000 square feet in New York for another 10 years.

  • December 4, 2017

    Ex-Norwegian Cruise CEO Wants $95M From Co., Successor

    A former Norwegian Cruise Line CEO asked jurors in Miami for $95 million in damages Monday against his former employer and another ex-CEO for allegedly killing his chances in the industry with defamatory statements and cutting him out of profit-sharing revenue.

  • December 4, 2017

    Sidley, Stroock Steer $217M Loan For Brooklyn Property

    Sidley Austin LLP represented M&T Bank in connection with its roughly $217.3 million loan to Stroock & Stroock & Lavan LLP-counseled Midtown Equities LLC for a mixed-use project in Brooklyn's DUMBO neighborhood, according to records made public in New York on Monday.

  • December 4, 2017

    High Court's Cert Denials Include Same-Sex Benefits Case

    The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday turned away a trio of employment cases, including a closely watched suit over whether Houston can extend the same spousal benefits to city workers in same-sex and heterosexual marriages, and a former Bellagio employee's race and sex bias suit.

Expert Analysis

  • Preparing Your Company Witnesses For The Gotcha Question

    Matthew Keenan

    Catching a witness flat-footed on an important topic is no longer confined to cable news, and corporate legal defenses can likewise die when witnesses profess ignorance on things that jurors believe they should know. However, employing some common sense tools can minimize potential harm, says Matthew Keenan of Shook Hardy Bacon LLP.

  • Series

    Judging A Book: Saris Reviews 'Locking Up Our Own'

    Judge Patti Saris

    Having just completed a six-year term as chair of the U.S. Sentencing Commission, I read Yale Law School professor James Forman's new book, "Locking Up Our Own: Crime and Punishment in Black America," with particular interest, says Judge Patti Saris, chief judge for the U.S. District Court for the District of Massachusetts.

  • Decoding Settlement Process For FLSA Claims At 2nd Circ.

    Nathan Oleson

    Has the latest stratagem of using a Rule 68 offer of judgment in a Fair Labor Standards Act settlement created an alternative to obtaining formal court approval? This question has divided New York federal district courts over the past two years, and it will be resolved when the Second Circuit hears the appeal in Mei Xing Yu v. Hasaki Restaurant, says Nathan Oleson of Akin Gump Strauss Hauer & Feld LLP.

  • NJ Consumer Contract Act Questions May Soon Get Answers

    Loly Tor

    The New Jersey Supreme Court recently ruled that certain claims under the state's Truth-in-Consumer Contract, Warranty and Notice Act could not be certified. But the court left other TCCWNA issues to be decided another day. Its forthcoming decision in Spade v. Select Comfort Corp. may provide answers to those remaining questions, say attorneys with K&L Gates LLP.

  • Roundup

    Judging A Book

    Locking Up Our Own

    Are the latest books on the judicial system worth reading? Federal judges share their thoughts in this series of book reviews.

  • Don't Waste This Planning Cycle: Year-End Strategies

    Hugh A. Simons

    Law firms are businesses where partners operate with significant autonomy. To see their priorities translate into individual partner action, firm leaders should use a few collaborative strategies, suggests Hugh A. Simons, former senior partner of The Boston Consulting Group and former COO of Ropes & Gray LLP.

  • From Snaps To Tweets: The Craft Of Social Media Discovery

    Matthew Hamilton

    Courts have consistently held that social media accounts are subject to established discovery principles but are reluctant to allow parties to rummage through private social media accounts. Recent case law confirms that narrowly tailored information requests get the best results, say Matthew Hamilton, Donna Fisher and Jessica Bae of Pepper Hamilton LLP.

  • An Interview With Former DHS Secretary Jeh Johnson

    Randy Maniloff

    Jeh Johnson, the former secretary of homeland security, was kind enough to let me visit him to reflect on his diverse career. He told stories that left me speechless. And yes, the man who was responsible for the Transportation Security Administration removed his shoes when going through airport security. You bet I asked, says Randy Maniloff of White and Williams LLP.

  • Hurdles To Consider When Securing A Personnel File

    Michael Errera

    Attorneys should follow seven key points to ensure that their discovery requests and pleadings are appropriately prepared to overcome common hurdles that may be encountered when requesting production of a personnel file, say Michael Errera and Paul Ferland of Foran Glennon Palandech Ponzi & Rudloff PC.

  • Series

    Judging A Book: Gilstrap Reviews 'Alexander Hamilton'

    Judge Rodney Gilstrap

    While Alexander Hamilton is the subject of a hit Broadway musical and renewed biographical examinations, professor Kate Brown takes us down a road less traveled in her book "Alexander Hamilton and the Development of American Law" — showing Hamilton as first, last and foremost an American lawyer, says U.S. District Judge Rodney Gilstrap of the Eastern District of Texas.