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Hospitality

  • September 25, 2018

    Shearman, White & Case Lead $2.3B Sonic Take-Private Deal

    Inspire Brands, which boasts thousands of Arby's, Buffalo Wild Wings and Rusty Taco locations in its portfolio, has agreed to take drive-in restaurant chain Sonic Corp. private in a $2.3 billion deal steered by White & Case LLP and Shearman & Sterling LLP, the companies said on Tuesday.

  • September 25, 2018

    Kirkland, Fischer Behar Guide Grubhub’s $150M Tapingo Buy

    Chicago-based Grubhub Inc. said Tuesday that it has agreed to acquire venture capital-backed campus food ordering service Tapingo Inc. for approximately $150 million, in a deal guided by Kirkland & Ellis LLP, Fischer Behar Chen Well Orion & Co., Herzog Fox & Neeman and Silicon Legal Strategy.

  • September 24, 2018

    Resort Unwelcoming To Spanish-Speaking Workers: EEOC

    The U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission sued a San Antonio resort and its management company Monday in Texas federal court, accusing them of creating a hostile work environment in which Spanish-speaking workers were harassed and subjected to an English-only policy even when guests were not present.

  • September 24, 2018

    Ozzy Osbourne Drops Antitrust Suit Against Venue Owner

    Ozzy Osbourne has dropped his putative class action suit in California federal court over Anschutz Entertainment Group’s allegedly anti-competitive block booking practices, saying there’s no reason to pursue the case now that musicians can book London’s large O2 Arena without committing to play the Staples Center in Los Angeles.

  • September 24, 2018

    Sports Teams Must Tackle Hacking Risk Amid Legal Gambling

    The legalization of sports betting in some states has brought with it a host of headaches for professional leagues looking to protect the integrity of games, and among the chief concerns is safeguarding team and player data from hackers who would use the information to gain an edge placing wagers.

  • September 24, 2018

    Real Estate Rumors: MSD, Brookfield, Starwood

    MSD Capital is reportedly buying a Florida hotel from Starwood for likely more than $500 million, Brookfield Asset Management is said to be buying a the PGA National Resort & Spa in Florida for $255 million and Starwood has reportedly sold an office building in Florida for $27.25 million.

  • September 24, 2018

    Hilton Calling System Isn't An Autodialer, Court Says

    Hilton Grand Vacations has won its quick-win bid in a proposed class action alleging that the company bombarded consumers with unwanted robocalls, with a Florida federal judge holding Monday that the woman leading the suit did not show that the calls she received were made using an autodialer.

  • September 24, 2018

    Hampton Inn Not Covered For $1M Water Damage, Judge Says

    A Hampton Inn owner is on the hook for nearly $1 million in repair costs after an Illinois federal judge ruled Monday that extensive water damage on the property isn’t covered by its insurance policy.

  • September 24, 2018

    Norwegian Cruise Co. Accused Of Travel Insurance Ruse

    Norwegian Cruise Lines got hit with a proposed class action Friday in Florida federal court alleging the company reaped concealed kickbacks via the sale of travel insurance policies and deceptively marketed the scheme that unfairly passed on the cost of inflated premiums to consumers.

  • September 21, 2018

    UK Litigation Roundup: Here's What You Missed In London

    The last week has seen a London no dealing desk sue Merrill Lynch for breach of fiduciary duty, more competition claims against Visa and MasterCard and a German shipper bring a suit against Axa and other insurers.

  • September 21, 2018

    Miami Beach Restaurant Servers Win Cert. In Tips Suit

    A Florida federal judge has preliminarily certified a class of servers at a Miami Beach restaurant who claim they were forced to share their tips with their employer and were not paid for all hours worked in violation of the Fair Labor Standards Act.

  • September 21, 2018

    Atlantic City's Woes Stem From Relying On Casino Tax: Report

    A report by the state of New Jersey has outlined the history and causes of Atlantic City's financial woes, linking its problems to the city's reliance on casino tax revenues, and recommended imbuing the tax assessor with more power.

  • September 21, 2018

    Chipotle To Face Claims It Fired Manager After Back Surgery

    Chipotle Mexican Grill Inc. can’t duck a former Philadelphia area manager’s allegations that he was fired because he needed back surgery, a Pennsylvania federal judge has ruled.

  • September 21, 2018

    Travel Agents Seek 9th Circ. Redo Of Multicity Fares Ruling

    Travel agents asked the Ninth Circuit on Thursday to rehear its August ruling that shut down an antitrust suit accusing American Airlines, Delta, United and others of price-fixing, saying the U.S. Supreme Court's Twombly decision should not be used to suppress private antitrust cases.

  • September 21, 2018

    3rd Circ. Sides With Casinos In Gambler's Suit Over Perks

    The Third Circuit has upheld a New Jersey lower court's ruling that favored two Atlantic City casinos in a "high roller’s" suit claiming the casinos unlawfully promised him coupons and free amenities to gamble at their establishments but failed to back up their offers, finding that the gambler misunderstood the offers and saying "the house always wins."

  • September 21, 2018

    Country Singer's Pub Didn't Infringe 'Descriptive' TM: 6th Circ.

    The Sixth Circuit has affirmed a lower court’s decision favoring a restaurant chain run in partnership with country singer Dierks Bentley, saying none of the arguments raised in Nashville pub The Row’s infringement suit over the chain’s "Whiskey Row" trademark alter the conclusion that its own mark is merely descriptive.

  • September 20, 2018

    Facebook Must Fix Data Policy Or Face Action, EU Says

    A top European Commission official on Thursday slammed Facebook for its "misleading" new data use policy and warned that the site could face sanctions if it doesn't comply with European consumer law by the end of the year, while separately praising Airbnb for making several "necessary" pricing disclosure and consumer redress changes.

  • September 20, 2018

    11th Circ. Asked To Reconsider 'Poop Cruise' Suit Dismissal

    Carnival passengers who were stranded at sea in a 2013 incident known as the “Poop Cruise” asked the Eleventh Circuit on Thursday to reconsider an August decision to toss their suit, saying the ruling runs counter to U.S. Supreme Court precedent.

  • September 20, 2018

    Chancery OKs Papa John's Founder's Records Suit For Trial

    A Delaware Chancery Court judge on Thursday declined to dismiss a “books and records” lawsuit filed against Papa John’s by former pizza chain CEO John Schnatter, rejecting company claims that he was using the demands to improperly support a suit to counter actions against him and other employees. 

  • September 20, 2018

    Calif. Tribe Launches Environmental Review For New Casino

    The U.S. Bureau of Indian Affairs and the Tule River Indian Tribe are moving forward with plans to begin a preliminary environmental review process for a proposed 40-acre casino and tribe housing project in California, according to a notice filed Thursday.

Expert Analysis

  • 3 Top E-Discovery Case Law Lessons Of 2018 (So Far)

    Casey Sullivan

    The blockbuster e-discovery cases, with big sanctions and bigger controversies, have been few and far between this year. But that doesn’t mean the legal questions around e-discovery have been answered. Let’s take a closer look at three cases worthy of our attention, says Casey Sullivan, an attorney at discovery technology provider Logikcull.

  • Opinion

    Law Schools Must Take A Stand Against Mandatory Arbitration

    Isabel Finley

    Later this week, Harvard Law students will begin bidding on interview slots with the nation’s top law firms. Our institutions owe it to their students not only to require firms to disclose mandatory arbitration provisions in new associate contracts, but also to bar employers from on-campus recruiting if they require these provisions, says Isabel Finley, a third-year student at Harvard Law School and president of the Harvard Women’s Law Association.

  • Myths And Facts About Using TAR Across Borders

    John Tredennick

    Many legal teams involved in cross-border matters still hesitate to use technology assisted review, questioning its ability to handle non-English document collections. However, with the proper expertise, modern TAR can be used with any language, including challenging Asian languages, say John Tredennick and David Sannar of Catalyst Repository Systems.

  • Series

    Winner's Playbook: Behind The Scenes Of The Sports Bet Case

    Matthew McGill

    Three members of the Gibson Dunn & Crutcher LLP team that represented the state of New Jersey in Murphy v. NCAA explain how they kept the faith — over six years of litigation — that the U.S. Supreme Court would eventually strike down the federal prohibition on state legalization of sports wagering.

  • Roundup

    From Lawmaker To Lawyer

    From Lawmaker To Lawyer

    Earlier this year, Rep. Trey Gowdy, R-S.C., made headlines with his decision to leave Congress and return to law. ​​In this series, former members of Congress who made that move discuss how their experience on the Hill influenced their law practice.

  • How Sports Bet Ruling Affects Players' Collective Bargaining

    Vincent Cohen Jr.

    Following the U.S. Supreme Court's decision in Murphy v. NCAA, player associations must not only monitor how state legislatures and Congress react to the ruling, but also proactively engage with both federal and state legislatures. Failure to do so will likely leave players in an unfavorable position vis-a-vis their respective leagues, say attorneys with Dechert LLP.

  • Opinion

    A Trump Supreme Court Nominee Can Be Defeated

    Nan Aron

    The Senate Republican leadership and the Trump administration are racing to fill Justice Anthony Kennedy’s spot on the U.S. Supreme Court. Does opposition to their plans have any chance of success? My answer is yes, because the stakes are so high, people are so engaged, and the records of those short-listed are so deeply troubling, says Nan Aron, president of Alliance for Justice.

  • Tax Decisions Bring Challenges And Opportunities To Tribes

    Rob Roy Smith

    In the wake of U.S. v. Jim in the Eleventh Circuit and South Dakota v. Wayfair in the U.S. Supreme Court, Native American tribes should takes steps to protect their rights under the general welfare exclusion and assert their sovereignty to impose new sales taxes, says Rob Roy Smith of Kilpatrick Townsend & Stockton LLP.

  • Limiting Law Firms' Professional Liability Risks: Part 3

    Stuart Pattison

    As clients increasingly look to limit their own liability exposure, they can reasonably expect that their retained counsel should do the same. In this context, a carefully crafted, thoughtfully presented engagement letter can help a law firm strike a successful balance between protecting itself and preserving a client relationship, say Stuart Pattison and John Muller of Sompo International Holdings Ltd.

  • New Stats On Millennial Attorney Disciplinary Actions

    Jean Edwards

    In this analysis of disciplinary action trends in the legal industry, Edwards Neils LLC managing member Jean Edwards examines data provided by bar organizations for 17 states and the District of Columbia.