Hospitality

  • December 12, 2017

    Spa Worker Must Arbitrate Claims Over Rape Allegation

    A spa facialist who worked onboard a Princess Cruise Lines ship must arbitrate her claim against her spa company employer over an alleged rape that took place while she was off-duty, although her claims against the cruise line can remain in court, a Florida federal judge ruled Tuesday.

  • December 12, 2017

    Mass. Vending Co. Owners Sentenced For Illegal Gaming

    The owners of vending machine company Four Star Vending in North Andover pled guilty and were sentenced for running an illegal gaming and money laundering scheme that netted the largest seizure in the history of Massachusetts' money laundering statute, the state’s attorney general said Tuesday.

  • December 12, 2017

    McCormick & Schmick's Workers Sue For Sexual Harassment

    Five Latina women who have worked in low-wage positions at McCormick & Schmick’s restaurant in Boston's Faneuil Hall accused the company of discrimination in a lawsuit filed in Massachusetts state court on Tuesday, saying they were consistently sexually harassed on the job.

  • December 12, 2017

    NY Catering Hall Hit With Forced Labor, Visa Fraud Charges

    Two men in Long Island, New York, who allegedly lured Filipino immigrants to the United States with false promises of good jobs in the hospitality business only to force them to work for substandard wages at a catering hall now face charges of forced labor and visa fraud, the federal government said on Monday.

  • December 12, 2017

    Gawker, Deadspin Libel Suit Set For Feb. 14 Trial

    A sports gambling guru and a Deadspin.com writer accused of defaming him will go head to head in New York bankruptcy court after a judge set a Feb. 14 trial date to determine whether the journalist is protected by an injunction tied to the sale of the website’s bankrupt former parent Gawker Media.

  • December 12, 2017

    The Top 10 Trademark Rulings Of 2017

    From Cheerios box trade dress to generic “googling” to a blockbuster U.S. Supreme Court decision, 2017 was another bumper year for major rulings in trademark law. Here are the 10 you need to remember.

  • December 12, 2017

    Winstead, Haynes And Boone Steer $55M Calif. Hyatt Loan

    Winstead PC represented Rael Development Corp. in connection with its $55 million construction loan from Haynes and Boone LLP-counseled Hall Structured Finance for a Hyatt hotel and retail project in Palm Springs, California, according to an announcement on Tuesday from the companies.

  • December 12, 2017

    DOL Extends Comment Deadline On Tip Pool Rollback

    The U.S. Department of Labor has extended a deadline for comments on its proposal to let hospitality employers redistribute workers’ tips if they pay at least minimum wage, after lawmakers and workers’ advocates called on the agency to give stakeholders more time to weigh in.

  • December 12, 2017

    Real Estate Rumors: Kirkland, Jim Crane, Monday Properties

    Kirkland & Ellis has reportedly leased another 120,000 square feet in Manhattan, a company run by Houston Astros owner Jim Crane is said to have landed a $19 million loan for a Florida hotel project, and Monday Properties has reportedly reached a deal to lease more than 16,000 square feet in New York.

  • December 12, 2017

    Kramer Levin, Sidley Steer VICI Properties' $100M IPO Filing

    Kramer Levin Naftalis & Frankel LLP is representing Caesars Entertainment Corp.'s real estate investment trust VICI Properties Inc. in connection with its Tuesday filing for a $100 million initial public offering, a matter Sidley Austin LLP is working on for the underwriters.

  • December 11, 2017

    Has Litigation Finance Shed Its Stigma?

    Once a taboo topic in the halls of BigLaw, litigation finance is winning over converts. And the peer pressure is building for rival law firms to join the bandwagon.

  • December 11, 2017

    Why Investors Are Taking The Leap To 3rd-Party Funding

    They often don’t know exactly what they’re buying, and there’s an ever-present chance they could come up empty in a given case. Here’s why investors are flocking to litigation finance anyway.

  • December 11, 2017

    What Your Colleagues Think Of Litigation Finance

    We asked, and you answered. Here are the results of Law360’s inaugural survey on third-party legal funding.

  • December 11, 2017

    Jury Sides With San Diego Comic-Con In Trademark Spat

    A California federal jury on Friday found in favor of San Diego Comic Convention when it ruled that a rival event in Utah infringed its valid trademarks related to “comic-con,” setting the stage for the long-running Southern California pop culture event to seek a permanent injunction to prevent future usage.

  • December 11, 2017

    Fla. Country Club GC Seeks Sanctions Over Resident's Suit

    The general counsel for a Boca Raton, Florida, country club renewed his sanctions bid Friday against a club property owner for continuing to pursue "frivolous" claims after he again sought to bring a class action accusing the counsel of contributing to mismanagement that allegedly decimated property values and prompted increased fees.

  • December 11, 2017

    Fla. City Scores Wins At 11th Circ. In Liquor Store Sale Row

    The Eleventh Circuit on Friday largely affirmed a decision tossing litigation alleging a conspiracy between Marathon, Florida, and city officials to try to discourage the sale of a liquor store and cocktail lounge, concluding that most of the allegations were rightfully dismissed, but one isn’t yet ripe for review.

  • December 11, 2017

    NFL Hall Can Talk To Ticket Holders In Canceled Game Suit

    An Ohio federal judge refused Monday to restrict the Pro Football Hall of Fame's communications with disgruntled ticket holders suing over the last-minute cancellation of the 2016 NFL Hall of Fame Game, finding the museum's attempts to get the proposed class members to accept refunds were not misleading or malicious.

  • December 11, 2017

    Insurer Seeks Quick Win In Live Nation Concert Injuries Suit

    Secura Insurance on Friday told a Kentucky federal court it does not have to provide concert venue operator Live Nation coverage for injuries claimed at a concert, saying its policy only covers the company that provided security for the concert.

  • December 11, 2017

    Justices Won’t Review Kansas' Tribal Gaming Loss

    The U.S. Supreme Court refused Monday to tackle a Tenth Circuit decision rejecting the state of Kansas’ challenge to a National Indian Gaming Commission advisory opinion that purportedly paved the way for the Quapaw Tribe of Oklahoma’s casino project.

  • December 11, 2017

    Ex-Norwegian Cruise CEO Loses His $95M Defamation Suit

    A former Norwegian Cruise Line CEO lost his $95 million defamation suit against his former employer and his successor when a Miami jury returned a verdict Monday rejecting his claims that the company and its CEO killed his chances in the industry with defamatory statements and cut him out of profit-sharing revenue.

Expert Analysis

  • Series

    40 Years Of FCPA: Cross-Border Efforts And Growing Risk

    Patrick Stokes

    The U.S. agencies’ increasing coordination with their foreign partners has led to more potent Foreign Corrupt Practices Act investigations — in terms of both their scope and settlement cost, say Patrick Stokes, former chief of the FCPA Unit at the U.S. Department of Justice, and Zachariah Lloyd of Gibson Dunn & Crutcher LLP.

  • FDA Menu Labeling Guidance: Latest Step On A Long Road

    Arthur DeCelle.jpg

    Nutrition labeling on chain restaurant menus and vending machines, mandated by the Affordable Care Act, advanced last month with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's publication of draft guidance on the controversial topic. The FDA continues work toward implementing the law, but each step seems to uncover novel issues, says Arthur DeCelle of McDermott Will & Emery LLP.

  • Series

    Judging A Book: Cooke Reviews 'Constance Baker Motley'

    Judge Marcia Cooke

    Gary Ford's new book, "Constance Baker Motley: One Woman’s Fight for Civil Rights and Equal Justice Under Law," is more than a biography of the first African-American woman to become a federal judge. It presents in vivid detail how her work altered the legal landscape of the United States, says U.S. District Judge Marcia Cooke of the Southern District of Florida.

  • Keeping Your Law Library Relevant In The Age Of Google

    Donna Terjesen

    Google’s status as a go-to research tool has transformed legal research habits, leading critics to view law libraries as cost centers. Law firms should embrace Google-style research tools and manage costs efficiently in order to position their libraries as valuable assets for years to come, says Donna Terjesen of HBR Consulting.

  • 6 Things You Need To Know About Millennial Jurors

    Zachary Martin

    Millennials are now the largest living generation and comprise one-third of jurors. While it is impossible to generalize a group so large and diverse, trial lawyers should be mindful of certain generational differences, say baby boomer Lee Hollis and millennial Zachary Martin of Lightfoot Franklin & White LLC.

  • Series

    40 Years Of FCPA: A View From The Monitorship Trenches

    Gil Soffer

    There have been many articles on the corporate monitor selection process, but you will find little guidance on how to prepare yourself for a job that has few parallels. There are three key lessons I have learned over the course of a Foreign Corrupt Practices Act monitorship still in progress, says Gil Soffer of Katten Muchin Rosenman LLP.

  • Series

    40 Years Of FCPA: The Untold Story Of The Resource Guide

    Charles Duross

    Much has been written about the 2012 "Resource Guide to the U.S. Foreign Corrupt Practices Act," but no one has talked about the behind-the-scenes work that produced the guide — until now, say Charles Duross, former chief of the FCPA Unit at the U.S. Department of Justice, and Kara Novaco Brockmeyer, former chief of the FCPA Unit at the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission.

  • Series

    40 Years Of FCPA: A Journey From Conviction To Dismissal

    Janet Levine

    The twist in the Lindsey Manufacturing Foreign Corrupt Practices Act case was the truncated time in which we prepared. Having refused to waive their rights to a speedy trial, our clients took control of the case — this, along with the compressed time frame, forced the government to make errors, say Janet Levine, Sima Namiri-Kalantari and Megan Weisgerber of Crowell & Moring LLP.

  • Alternatives To 'Key Money' In Hotel Management Agreements

    Ronald Kornreich

    One financial incentive commonly offered in hotel management agreements, known as "key money," is straightforward and relatively easy to negotiate. However, key money is not the right fit for every owner or operator, or every hotel, and there are alternatives, says Ronald Kornreich of Akerman LLP.

  • Series

    40 Years Of FCPA: The Siemens Lesson — Tillerson Is Right

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    Since its whopping $800 million Foreign Corrupt Practices Act settlement in 2008, Siemens cleaned up — and it has “cleaned up” in its long-standing competition with General Electric. How? As Secretary of State Rex Tillerson reportedly told President Donald Trump, you don’t need to pay bribes to succeed in international business, says Peter Y. Solmssen, former general counsel of Siemens.