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Hospitality

  • January 17, 2019

    DOI Wrongly Rejected Tribe's Gambling Rights, Court Says

    A Washington, D.C., federal court has held that the Koi Nation of Northern California should be allowed to move forward with its gambling efforts, concluding that the U.S. Department of the Interior read the Indian Gaming Regulatory Act too narrowly in rejecting the tribe’s attempts to get the ball rolling.

  • January 17, 2019

    Royal Caribbean Death Suit Nixed After Plaintiff Rejects Deal

    A Florida federal judge’s warning to a woman that she may regret refusing a $500,000 settlement offer in her suit against Royal Caribbean over her teenage daughter's salmonella death proved prescient when the suit was tossed.

  • January 17, 2019

    Lesbian Ex-Chili's Server Hits Chain With Sex Bias Charge

    A lesbian former Chili's Grill & Bar server has claimed she was forced to leave her job at the restaurant chain following managers' comments about how she dressed while she was trying to get a promotion.

  • January 17, 2019

    Biz Groups Back GrubHub In 9th Circ. Gig Economy Row

    The U.S. Chamber of Commerce and others have told the Ninth Circuit that upending a California federal judge's finding that an ex-GrubHub driver was an independent contractor and not an employee would devastate internet and gig-economy businesses that rely on independent contractors.

  • January 17, 2019

    Vegas Casinos Avoid Suit In Texas Over Gambler's Suicide

    The Fifth Circuit has upheld a ruling that Caesar's Palace, MGM Grand and other casinos can't be sued in Texas over the suicide of a high-stakes gambler, saying the casinos' alleged practice of sending jets to Texas to bring him to gamble in Las Vegas wasn't enough to give courts in the state authority to hear the case.

  • January 17, 2019

    Mass. Gov. Moves To Legalize Sports Betting

    Massachusetts Gov. Charlie Baker announced a new bill Thursday that would make sports betting legal in the state and add a new tax to already legal daily fantasy sports sites, proposals stemming from last year’s landmark U.S. Supreme Court decision giving states the ability to legalize sports wagering.

  • January 16, 2019

    Gaming Cos. Get 90-Day Grace Period After Wire Act Changes

    The Department of Justice has officially declared a 90-day grace period for online gambling businesses to comply with an abrupt change in its interpretation of the Wire Act, which bucked previous guidance and found that all non-sports interstate gambling runs afoul of the law.

  • January 16, 2019

    GSA Ignored Constitution In Trump Hotel Analysis: OIG

    The U.S. General Services Administration wrongly failed to consider potential constitutional violations when it looked into a possible breach of the lease for the federal building in Washington, D.C., that is now the Trump International Hotel, resulting in continued uncertainty over the lease, a GSA watchdog said Wednesday.

  • January 16, 2019

    Wyndham Gets Terms-Of-Use Claim Cut From Resort Fee Suit

    Two Wyndham companies beat a proposed class claim that their websites violate New Jersey’s Truth in Consumer Contract, Warranty and Notice Act, after a Pennsylvania federal judge ruled Wednesday the lead plaintiff didn’t meet the law’s definition of an “aggrieved consumer.”

  • January 16, 2019

    Fla. Tribe, Member Ask Justices To Rule On Gambling Tax Row

    The Miccosukee Tribe of Indians and a member have asked the U.S. Supreme Court to overturn an Eleventh Circuit decision that the member owes taxes on tribal payments the federal government contended were derived from casino revenue.

  • January 16, 2019

    North Dakota Bill Seeks Framework For Tribal Tax Agreements

    A bipartisan bill has been introduced in the North Dakota Legislature that would create a pathway for American Indian tribes in the state to introduce tobacco, alcohol and state gross receipts taxes for purchases made on reservations.

  • January 16, 2019

    Gov't Shutdown Stymies Dormitory Co.'s Fed Contract Case

    A dormitory services company's unfair treatment suit against the U.S. government slowed to a crawl in the Court of Federal Claims when the presiding judge asked the parties whether she should stay the case in light of an appropriations lapse due to the government shutdown.

  • January 16, 2019

    No Winner, No Loser In Steamboat Trademark Row

    Two boat companies that had fought for years over claims they infringed each other's trademarks found out from a Delaware federal jury Wednesday that their entire fight was for nothing — no one's trademarks were infringed at all. 

  • January 16, 2019

    Pamunkey Tribe Eyes Commercial Casinos Via Va. Bills

    The chief of the Pamunkey Indian tribe of Virginia has said new bills in the state Legislature would allow the tribe to take part in the race to build commercial casinos in the state, in a bid to keep the tribe from losing ground while it pursues the traditional tribal gambling track.

  • January 16, 2019

    Fla. Medical Spa Hit With TCPA Suit Over Unwanted Texts

    A Miami-area medical spa was hit with a putative class action Wednesday in Florida federal court, alleging that it sent unwanted telemarketing text messages, in violation of the Telephone Consumer Protection Act.

  • January 15, 2019

    Brewery Hops On Shutdown Suit Bandwagon Over IPA Label

    Atlas Brew Works LLC hit the federal government with a First Amendment complaint in D.C. federal court Tuesday, challenging a law that requires beer sellers to have their labels approved by the Federal Alcohol Administration, which it hasn't been doing because of the shutdown.

  • January 15, 2019

    EU IP Office Pulls McDonald’s Big Mac TM In Supermac Row

    The European Union Intellectual Property Office has revoked McDonald's International Property Company Ltd.’s EU trademark for the term Big Mac, finding that it was not being put to genuine use, after it was challenged by an Irish fast-food chain called Supermac’s, according to documents filed by the EUIPO Tuesday.

  • January 15, 2019

    Subcontractor Deals Outside Union's Purview: NLRB Memo

    The National Labor Relations Board general counsel’s office unveiled a trio of advice memorandums on Monday, finding in one that an energy company could start enforcing a nonsolicitation clause that prevented subcontractors from hiring its workers for six months without first bargaining with the union that represented them.

  • January 15, 2019

    PTAB To Review IBM Patent Despite $57M Groupon Case

    The Patent Trial and Appeal Board will review an IBM Corp. e-commerce patent challenged by a group of travel websites, rejecting Tuesday the argument that it should deny the petition in light of a recent jury verdict against Groupon Inc. in a $57 million infringement dispute.

  • January 15, 2019

    Real Estate Lawyers On The Move

    Clifford Chance US LLP, Carlton Fields Jorden Burt PA, Blank Rome LLP and Greenberg Traurig LLP were among various law firms that made real estate, construction or hospitality hires over the past month.

Expert Analysis

  • Diversity's Next Step: Developing Minority Partners

    Chris King.jpg

    The lack of minority partners comes at a high cost to firms, say attorneys at Lightfoot Franklin & White LLC, as they suggest several practical ways to tackle this problem.

  • Arbitrators And Mediators Should Reflect Society's Diversity

    James Jenkins

    Alternative dispute resolution providers have made great strides toward diversity, but recent statistics show there is still work to be done. There are certain steps ADR providers can take to actively recruit more women and minority candidates to serve as arbitrators and mediators, says James Jenkins of the American Arbitration Association.

  • Why AFAs Are Key To The Future Of Legal Practice

    Kelly Eisenlohr-Moul

    Alternative fee agreements can help align law firm and client interests, increase efficiency and eliminate corporate extortion, among other benefits. They are the best thing to happen to the practice of law in decades, says Kelly Eisenlohr-Moul at Dinsmore & Shohl LLP.

  • Series

    Judging A Book: Barron Reviews 'The Clamor Of Lawyers'

    Judge David Barron

    Can lawyers lead a revolution? According to "The Clamor of Lawyers: The American Revolution and Crisis in the Legal Profession" — a slim but elegant volume by Peter Charles Hoffer and Williamjames Hull Hoffer — they can and they did, says First Circuit Judge David Barron.

  • Tip Credits: Methods For Measuring Employee Work Time

    Elizabeth Arnold

    Recent court decisions and regulatory actions indicate that the employee tip credit landscape appears to be in flux. Elizabeth Arnold and Chester Hanvey of Berkeley Research Group LLC examine scientifically based methodologies used to determine how employees spend their time and to identify time spent on “tippable” work.

  • Handling Corporate Congressional Probes In The Trump Era

    John Hellerman

    President Donald Trump’s approach to crisis communications has changed the game enough to demand companies' consideration of a whole new set of options. John Hellerman of Hellerman Communications and Bill Pittard of KaiserDillon PLLC discuss whether corporations can successfully use similar tactics.

  • How Retailers Can Avoid Discrimination Claims From Clientele

    Edward Harold

    In a country with an increasingly diverse population of consumers, becoming known as a store that treats minority customers poorly is a surefire way to lose business. Retailers need to understand how these claims can come about in order to prevent the underlying issues, says Edward Harold of Fisher & Phillips LLP.

  • Opinion

    The Case For Lawyer-Directed Litigation Funding In NY: Part 2

    Peter Jarvis

    Lawyer-directed nonrecourse litigation funding is more likely to protect a lawyer's exercise of independent professional judgment than traditional means of litigation finance, and furthermore enables worthwhile cases that otherwise could not be funded, say Peter Jarvis and Trisha Thompson of Holland & Knight LLP.

  • Opinion

    The Case For Lawyer-Directed Litigation Funding In NY: Part 1

    Peter Jarvis

    Contrary to what the New York City Bar Association concluded in an ethics opinion last year, lawyer-directed nonrecourse commercial litigation funding does not violate New York rules on sharing fees with nonlawyers, say Peter Jarvis and Trisha Thompson of Holland & Knight LLP.

  • 7 Questions To Add To Your Lateral Partner Questionnaire

    Howard Rosenberg

    Law firms should redesign the vetting process for lateral candidates so it directly addresses sexual harassment and assault issues, says Howard Rosenberg of Decipher.