Illinois

  • January 19, 2021

    Michael Best Hires Illinois Governor's Ex-Legislative Director

    Michael Best Strategies has hired Illinois Gov. J.B. Pritzker's former legislative director as a principal and as senior counsel at Michael Best & Friedrich LLP, the firm announced.

  • January 19, 2021

    Justices Side With 3rd Circ. On Items Seized Before Ch. 13

    The U.S. Supreme Court on Tuesday rejected a certiorari petition from a debtor regarding the turnover of property seized before a Chapter 13 bankruptcy filing, in line with its recent ruling in City of Chicago v. Fulton.

  • January 19, 2021

    Coronavirus Regulations: A State-By-State Week In Review

    The COVID-19 vaccination effort led to milestones over the past week in states including Florida and Texas, which became the first in the nation to administer its millionth dose, and prompted New York to call on Pfizer for direct purchase access so the state can meet increased demand due to expanded eligibility.

  • January 19, 2021

    Real Estate Rumors: KKR, John Novak, DR Horton

    KKR has reportedly picked up two Florida industrial properties for $13 million, a venture that includes developer John Novak is said to have paid $25 million for 42,900 square feet in Chicago, and D.R. Horton is reportedly hoping to rezone 36.5 acres in Florida in order to build 205 homes there.

  • January 19, 2021

    Deutsche Looks To Exit Suit Over Claims Of Traders' Spoofing

    Deutsche Bank AG has urged an Illinois federal judge to toss a proposed class action seeking to hold it responsible for two former traders' alleged 2013 illegal spoofing schemes, arguing the Commodity Exchange Act doesn't allow for such claims.

  • January 19, 2021

    Buyers Tell 7th Circ. Best Buy Geek Squad Plan Is A Warranty

    Two customers who purchased an allegedly defective plasma television from Best Buy urged the Seventh Circuit Tuesday to overturn a lower court's decision that deemed the chain's "Geek Squad Protection Plan" a service contract instead of a warranty.

  • January 19, 2021

    Girardi Gained Their Trust, But Left Them With Regret

    In an airy conference room overlooking downtown San Francisco, celebrity trial lawyer Thomas V. Girardi looked into Kathy Ruigomez's sleepless eyes and told her everything was going to be all right.

  • January 15, 2021

    OCC Defends Valid-When-Made Rule In State AGs' Suit

    The Office of the Comptroller of the Currency has urged a California federal court to reject an effort by California and two other states to block the agency's valid-when-made rule, arguing the rule was well within bounds as an attempt to mitigate legal uncertainty surrounding interest rate transferability.

  • January 15, 2021

    SkyWest Says Fed. Law Negates Flight Attendants' Wage Suit

    SkyWest Airlines has asked a California federal judge to scrap a proposed class action from flight attendants who claim they weren't paid for all hours they worked and weren't provided with Golden State-mandated meal and rest breaks, saying federal regulations governing the airline industry preempt their claims.

  • January 15, 2021

    Investors Say Grubhub Stock Claims Not 'Fraud By Hindsight'

    Grubhub investors urged an Illinois federal judge Friday not to toss out their securities fraud suit claiming the company lied about its ability to attract high-quality diners, arguing their complaint lays out a legal theory "far from 'fraud by hindsight.'"

  • January 15, 2021

    9th Circ. Judge Doubts Insurer's SLAPP Sinking Tower Fight

    A Ninth Circuit judge appeared skeptical Friday of a New Jersey insurance company's efforts to toss under California's anti-SLAPP law an engineering firm's bad faith counterclaim in litigation over San Francisco's notorious sinking Millennium Tower, asking the insurer, "Why didn't you just fight the thing on the merits?"

  • January 15, 2021

    Virus Didn't Compromise ComEd Grand Jury, Feds Say

    Illinois federal prosecutors slammed a bid by former Commonwealth Edison Co. executives and lobbyists to access grand jury selection materials in their bribery case, arguing the request is based on the "mistaken conjecture" that additional jurors were improperly selected during the coronavirus pandemic. 

  • January 15, 2021

    NY, FTC Lead Charge To Expand Biometric Privacy Shields

    New York lawmakers and the Federal Trade Commission are the latest to step up pressure on companies to be upfront with consumers about the use of their biometric data, signaling that more laws and regulatory scrutiny are expected for the increasingly popular technology, attorneys say. 

  • January 15, 2021

    Blue States Challenge EPA Aircraft GHG Emissions Standards

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's new gas emissions standards for aircraft won't actually result in new reductions, said 12 attorneys general from California, Illinois, Pennsylvania, New York, and other Democrat-led states plus the District of Columbia in announcing a D.C. Circuit challenge Friday.

  • January 15, 2021

    Porn Co. Malibu Hit With Atty Fees After Failed Copyright Suit

    A federal judge is ordering porn studio Malibu Media to repay the legal bills of one of the thousands of internet users it has sued for copyright infringement, at one point wondering if the company leverages "ridicule and embarrassment" to win settlements.

  • January 15, 2021

    Finance Co. Asks 7th Circ. To Revive Suit Against Ex-Counsel

    The Seventh Circuit on Friday seemed skeptical of a commercial financing company's argument that a lower court should not have dismissed its claim that former legal counsel gave self-serving advice that led to penalties against the company's founder. 

  • January 15, 2021

    7th Circ. Wary Of Blocking Wis. Mandatory Bar Membership

    A Seventh Circuit judge on Friday appeared skeptical of a Wisconsin attorney's arguments that mandatory state bar membership for attorneys is barred under the U.S. Supreme Court's landmark Janus ruling, which blocked mandatory union membership and dues, saying they're "not perfect equivalents."

  • January 15, 2021

    Video Tech Co. Founder Charged In Pump-And-Dump Scheme

    The founder of a Silicon Valley video streaming service and an investment manager have been indicted for allegedly orchestrating a pump-and-dump stock fraud scheme, Illinois federal prosecutors announced Friday.

  • January 15, 2021

    7th Circ. Backs VA In Denying Ex-Nurse's Disability Bias Suit

    The Seventh Circuit backed the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs in a fired nurse's disability bias suit, finding she couldn't do the essential duties of her job at a VA hospital and refused to cooperate when the agency offered to reassign her.

  • January 14, 2021

    Virgin Asks 9th Circ. To Scrap Calif. Workers' $77M Wage Win

    Virgin America urged the Ninth Circuit on Thursday to overturn flight attendants' $77 million wage-and-hour win, along with a $6 million attorney fees award, arguing that federal aviation safety regulations preempt the Golden State's meal-and-rest break laws and the California Supreme Court's recent Ward and Oman rulings clear it of liability.

  • January 14, 2021

    $110M Fees Probed In $650M Facebook Biometric Privacy Deal

    A California federal judge on Thursday questioned a $110 million fee bid by attorneys representing Illinois Facebook users in a "groundbreaking" $650 million proposed settlement of claims that the social media giant's facial recognition technology violated their biometric privacy rights, suggesting that a fraction of that might be more appropriate.

  • January 14, 2021

    Feds Tell 7th Circ. $30M Kidney Failure Award Still Unjustified

    A federal lawyer told the Seventh Circuit on Thursday that a $29.7 million award for a kidney failure patient shouldn't stand, saying that a judge shirked the proper analysis needed when finding that the patient bore no blame for the progression of his hypertension.

  • January 14, 2021

    4 Things To Know About Illinois' New House Speaker

    Ancel Glink partner Emanuel "Chris" Welch took the gavel of the Illinois House of Representatives on Wednesday, ending the decadeslong tenure of his embattled predecessor and becoming the first Black man to hold the state's speaker post. Here are four things to know about the new House leader.

  • January 14, 2021

    7th Circ. Won't Keep Clearview BIPA Case In Federal Court

    The Seventh Circuit held Thursday that a lower court correctly sent back to state court a biometric privacy lawsuit against facial recognition technology company Clearview AI, saying the residents who sued were free to avoid federal court by narrowing their claims.  

  • January 14, 2021

    ThinkMarkets Says Former IT Worker Won't Return Docs

    Online broker ThinkMarkets sued an ex-employee in Illinois federal court Wednesday, alleging that the former information technology worker now works for a competitor that's suing the company and that he refuses to return proprietary information.

Expert Analysis

  • Series

    Lawyering While Parenting: A Day In A Mom's Pandemic Life

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    Josephine Bahn shares a view of her life working from home as an attorney at the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation while splitting child care responsibilities with her lawyer husband.

  • Chicago Debtors May Lose High Court Case But See Relief

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    While last week's oral arguments in Chicago v. Fulton suggest that the U.S. Supreme Court will likely favor the city's right to retain possession of bankrupt owners' impounded vehicles, new city programs will provide additional options for relief to vehicle owners, says Ariane Holtschlag at the Law Office of William J. Factor.

  • 5 Cost-Cutting Strategies For Corporate Legal Departments

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    To achieve long-term reduction in their legal expenses, companies must look beyond law firm hourly rates and better distribute their legal work among high-cost premier firms, low-cost practitioners and alternative legal service providers, and their own in-house teams, says Nathan Wenzel at SimpleLegal.

  • Series

    AGs In A Pandemic: Connors Talks Hawaii Travel Measures

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    Hawaii Attorney General Clare Connors shares how her office created a clear legal framework to assist policymakers in decisions regarding travel-related and other COVID-19 response efforts.

  • Guest Feature

    Preparing The Next Generation Of Female Trial Lawyers

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    To build the ranks of female trial attorneys, law firms must integrate them into every aspect of a case — from witness preparation to courtroom arguments — instead of relegating them to small roles, says Kalpana Srinivasan, co-managing partner at Susman Godfrey.

  • Guest Feature

    Mentorship Is Key To Fixing Drop-Off Of Women In Law

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    It falls to senior male attorneys to recognize the crisis female attorneys face as the pandemic amplifies an already unequal system and to offer their knowledge, experience and counsel to build a better future for women in law, says James Meadows at Culhane Meadows.

  • Petland Ruling Continues Scrutiny Of RICO Enterprise Claims

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    Michael Soyfer at Quinn Emanuel discusses how the Eleventh Circuit's recent decision in Cisneros v. Petland follows the appellate court trend of limiting what qualifies as an enterprise for Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act claims, despite the U.S. Supreme Court's efforts to limit constrictions on the definition.

  • Guest Feature

    5 Ways Firms Can Avoid Female Atty Exodus During Pandemic

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    The pandemic's disproportionate impact on women presents law firms with a unique opportunity to devise innovative policies that will address the increasing home life demands female lawyers face and help retain them long after COVID-19 is over, say Roberta Liebenberg at Fine Kaplan and Stephanie Scharf at Scharf Banks.

  • Ill. Ruling Bolsters Trend Against No-Injury Monitoring Claims

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    The Illinois Supreme Court's recent ruling in Berry v. City of Chicago, rejecting claims for medical monitoring by plaintiffs not suffering present physical injuries, reflects a growing trend and could influence other state courts to rule similarly, say John Ewald and Matthew Bush at King & Spalding.

  • A Justice Barrett Could Bring Clarity To Property Rights Law

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    While Judge Amy Coney Barrett’s recent Seventh Circuit decision in Protect Our Parks v. Chicago Park District reveals no particular vision on property rights, it suggests she would help clarify a famously muddled area of the law if confirmed to the U.S. Supreme Court, says Bryan Wenter at Miller Starr.

  • ITC Vs. Court Remedies For Trade Secret Theft Abroad

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    Recent cases illustrate that companies facing misappropriation of their trade secrets outside the U.S. should carefully choose between obtaining significant damages in district courts and timely exclusion orders in the U.S. International Trade Commission, say Charles Sanders and Nathanial McPherson at Latham.

  • How The State And Local Regulatory Landscape Is Expanding

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    States and localities are employing creative methods to emerge as key players in regulatory enforcement traditionally dominated by the federal government, including False Claims Act investigations, unfair and deceptive acts and practices claims, and pharmaceutical sector regulation, say attorneys at Troutman Pepper.

  • SEP Users Should Jettison Antitrust For Patent, Contract Law

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    Because the recent holdings in Federal Trade Commission v. Qualcomm and Continental Automotive Systems v. Avanci demonstrate antitrust's flaws in resolving disputes over licensing rates for standard-essential patents, users should employ contract and patent law for more flexibility in negotiations and litigation, say Erik Puknys and Michelle Rice at Finnegan.

  • Anticipating Litigation's Big Role In The 2020 Elections

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    Varying state election laws and increased mail-in voting may leave this November's presidential race without a clear winner, with ongoing and prospective voting-related lawsuits potentially affecting the outcome, say attorneys at Squire Patton.

  • Opinion

    Lawyers Must Fight Voter Suppression This Election Season

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    Lawyers should use their unique skill sets, knowledge and spheres of influence to fight burdensome ID requirements and other voter suppression tactics that may influence the 2020 elections, and to participate in potential post-election litigation, say CK Hoffler and Allyce Bailey at the National Bar Association.

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