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International Arbitration

  • September 10, 2018

    Commodities Supplier Wants $650K Emergency Award Axed

    Commodities supplier Tradiverse Corp. urged a New York federal court Friday to vacate an interim emergency arbitral award that requires the company to pay a $650,000 bond in proceedings initiated by a Venezuelan commodities merchant, saying it was not treated fairly by the arbitrator.

  • September 7, 2018

    Measuring The Recession’s Toll On The Legal Industry

    For starting attorneys, the financial crisis casts a long shadow, even though the worst is past. Here’s our breakdown of the data showing its impact and where the industry’s headed.

  • September 7, 2018

    Too Small To Fail?

    It’s been almost 10 years since Lehman Brothers collapsed — kicking off a global recession and putting two Skadden partners on a path to building a firm that would weather the storm. Here's how upstarts and their larger rivals are positioning themselves for the next downturn.

  • September 7, 2018

    9th Circ. Reverses Arbitration Order Against Emirati Bank

    The Ninth Circuit on Friday reversed an order compelling an Emirati bank to arbitrate a contract dispute with a U.S. financial technology company in California instead of Dubai, saying a lower court judge wrongly concluded that the bank had waived its right to argue that the court lacked jurisdiction.

  • September 7, 2018

    Brazilian Bank Can't Revive $50M Claim Against Insurers

    A New York federal judge on Friday upheld an arbitral award dismissing a Brazilian banking and financial services company's $50 million policy claim against two U.S. insurers, agreeing with the arbitration panel’s determination that the bank had made misrepresentations in its insurance application that voided the policy.

  • September 7, 2018

    Brazil's New GDPR-Inspired Law Could Spur EU Data Deal

    Brazil's first-ever national privacy regime could set up South America's biggest economy to work out a lucrative data-sharing pact with the European Union, despite a presidential veto that axed the agency intended to enforce it, attorneys say.

  • September 7, 2018

    Litigation Funder Adds 8 In UK With An Eye On Group Claims

    Litigation funder Augusta Ventures has boosted its London team with a string of high-profile hires from firms like Hogan Lovells, Eversheds Sutherland and Hausfeld LLP as it signaled plans to pursue larger-scale cases.

  • September 7, 2018

    Ecuador's $9.5B Fine On Chevron Was Fraudulent: Tribunal

    An international tribunal in The Hague has concluded that a $9.5 billion judgment issued against Chevron Corp. by an Ecuadorian court over pollution in the Amazon was tainted by fraud and that Ecuador wrongfully enforced the ruling in that country, according to documents released Friday.

  • September 6, 2018

    US Attacks On Dispute Panels Could Have Global Impact

    Parallel attacks by the Trump administration on two trade dispute resolution mechanisms may signal that the U.S. is looking to weaken their checks on protectionist policies, a goal that could lead to the breakdown of free trade that the World Trade Organization was created to maintain, experts say.

  • September 6, 2018

    Lloyd's Insurers Seek To Nix Carlyle's $400M Oil Loss Claim

    Lloyd’s of London underwriters asked a New York court on Thursday to rule that they have no obligation to pay Carlyle Group affiliates’ claim for nearly $400 million in crude oil they lost when a Moroccan oil refinery known as SAMIR was seized in 2015, asserting that Carlyle’s failure to provide timely notice of the losses forecloses coverage.

  • September 6, 2018

    Court Won't Limit Recusal Review In Tanzanian Mining Row

    A Canadian judge has concluded that judicial review of Tanzanian Goldfields Co. Ltd.’s efforts to boot the arbitrator overseeing its dispute with a Canadian mining company needn’t be restricted to the materials that were before the arbitrator when he declined to recuse himself from the proceedings.

  • September 6, 2018

    Embattled Tech Tycoon Owes $100M Award, Chinese Co. Says

    The co-founder of a struggling American electric vehicle startup was sued by a Chinese investment company in California federal court to enforce a more than $100 million arbitration award over debts allegedly left unpaid by the tech tycoon and his smartphone company.

  • September 6, 2018

    Ryan Awaiting NAFTA Details Before Making Compliance Call

    House Speaker Paul Ryan, R-Wis., on Thursday did not say whether a bilateral trade deal with Mexico will comply with Trade Promotion Authority and earn an easier route to passage, stressing that he needs more details about the North American Free Trade Agreement before making such a call.

  • September 5, 2018

    Del Monte Should Get Fees In Pineapple Award Row: Judge

    A Costa Rican pineapple farm should have to pay a Monaco-based Del Monte unit's attorneys' fees for mounting a baseless and inadequate challenge against a more than $29.3 million arbitration award issued to the food production and distribution company, a Florida magistrate judge concluded.

  • September 5, 2018

    Don't Aggravate $1.8B Peruvian Bond Dispute, Tribunal Says

    An arbitral tribunal has ordered Gramercy Funds Management LLC and Peru to avoid aggravating their $1.8 billion dispute over old government bonds at the request of the country, which claimed the U.S. asset manager has exacerbated the conflict with actions like spreading negative information about the nation in the press.

  • September 5, 2018

    Ukraine Says Russian Energy Co. Can't Enforce $112M Award

    Ukraine urged the D.C. Circuit to toss Russian energy company PAO Tatneft's bid to enforce a $112 million arbitral award it won following the forced 2007 seizure of a Ukrainian oil refinery, saying an exception to sovereign immunity doesn't apply in this instance.

  • September 5, 2018

    Most UK Firms Uninsured Against Cyberattack, Survey Shows

    Two thirds of U.K. firms do not have insurance cover for security breaches and the data loss they cause, a survey revealed on Wednesday, highlighting concerns about data protection after a series of high-profile attacks and breaches.

  • September 5, 2018

    Batch Of Akin Gump Attys Leave To Launch New Moscow Firm

    A group of now former Akin Gump Strauss Hauer & Feld LLP attorneys comprising roughly half the firm's Moscow office have decided to strike out on their own to form a new law firm based in the Russian capital in light of trans-Atlantic "geopolitical tensions," the group said Wednesday.

  • September 4, 2018

    Keep Sale In $1.2B Venezuela Award Row Paused, Court Hears

    Things began heating up even more in Delaware federal court on Friday as bondholders and other interested parties sought to maintain a pause on the sale of Citgo Petroleum Corp.'s parent company, a means for Crystallex International Corp. to enforce its $1.2 billion judgment against Venezuela.

  • September 4, 2018

    Withers Lands Ex-Bryan Cave Arbitration Pro In NY

    Withers LLP has nabbed a former Bryan Cave Leighton Paisner LLP attorney to lead its international arbitration team in the United States, bolstering its New York offerings with her experience representing clients in industries including hospitality, infrastructure, energy, insurance and pharmaceuticals, according to a Tuesday announcement.

Expert Analysis

  • Why Lawyers Shouldn't Accept Fees In Cryptocurrency: Part 2

    John Reed Stark

    The legal industry has already begun to feel the impact of anti-bribery and anti-money laundering requirements. When involved with cryptocurrency trading and remittance, law firms face more than the risk of being perceived as organizations that support money laundering practices, says John Reed Stark of John Reed Stark Consulting LLC.

  • Why Lawyers Shouldn't Accept Fees In Cryptocurrency: Part 1

    John Reed Stark

    Law firms are increasingly accepting cryptocurrency as payment for services. While this might seem innovative and forward-thinking, ironically it is much more of a throwback, says John Reed Stark of John Reed Stark Consulting LLC.

  • Impediments To Legal Industry's 'Inevitable' Future: Part 2

    Craig Levinson

    I agree with the legal pundits speculating that NewLaw’s present and future disruptors will radically change the legal services industry, but that change may not come quite as rapidly as predicted. Regardless, now is the time for both the incumbents and the challengers to best position themselves for the eventual shakeup, says Craig Levinson, founder of Levity Partners.

  • Impediments To Legal Industry's 'Inevitable' Future: Part 1

    Craig Levinson

    Legal pundits continue to make predictions that newer entrants into the industry — NewLaw firms, the Big Four and alternative legal service providers — will progressively seize greater amounts of market share from traditional law firms. But the BigLaw response has been underwhelming at best, and a glimpse at the market forces puts its lack of urgency into perspective, says Craig Levinson, founder of Levity Partners.

  • The State Of Creditor Recovery Efforts In Venezuela: Part 2

    Richard Cooper

    The next several weeks may shed a great deal of light on how vulnerable Venezuela and its state-owned oil company PDVSA are to creditor collection efforts. Bondholders should also closely monitor developments in the U.S. bribery suit brought by the PDVSA U.S. Litigation Trust, say Richard Cooper and Boaz Morag of Cleary Gottlieb Steen & Hamilton LLP. 

  • Opinion

    Defining Female Athletes: IAAF Gets It Wrong Again

    Sarah Hartley

    The International Association of Athletics Federations recently released new rules for "athletes with differences of sex development," and there is ample basis to attack them as unjustified measures that discriminate against women based on natural characteristics, says Sarah Hartley of Bryan Cave Leighton Paisner LLP.

  • The State Of Creditor Recovery Efforts In Venezuela: Part 1

    Richard Cooper

    There is a large pool of creditor claims against Venezuela and its state-owned oil company PDVSA that are not yet in litigation. Until recently, creditors had little incentive to litigate, but that may be changing for two reasons, say Richard Cooper and Boaz Morag of Cleary Gottlieb Steen & Hamilton LLP. 

  • Opinion

    Why Widespread Use Of Live Video Testimony Is Not Justified

    Geoffrey Wyatt

    Despite the partiality some courts have shown to live video testimony, it provides no advantages — and several disadvantages — over the tried-and-true method of videotaped depositions, say attorneys with Skadden Arps Slate Meagher & Flom LLP.

  • Series

    Judging A Book: Wallach Reviews 'Uncivil Warriors'

    Judge Evan Wallach

    "Uncivil Warriors: The Lawyers' Civil War," by Peter Hoffer, is a new book about the involvement of lawyers on both sides in the American Civil War. The discussion is enlightening and often fascinating, but falls short in several key areas, says Federal Circuit Judge Evan Wallach.

  • BigLaw Blogs In A Post-GDPR Marketing Universe

    Stephan Roussan

    Connecting with potential prospects is now more challenging due to the EU General Data Protection Regulation, meaning that law firm microsites, blogs and social media will become more valuable than ever. The firms that deploy them strategically will increase their relative visibility and accelerate the rebuilding of their opt-in distribution lists, says Stephan Roussan of ICVM Group.