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International Arbitration

  • August 15, 2018

    Rusoro Looks To Spark Action On $1.2B Venezuela Award

    Canadian miner Rusoro Mining Ltd. pressed a D.C. federal judge Wednesday to further facilitate the enforcement of the company's more than $1.2 billion arbitral award against Venezuela, angling itself to become the latest of the cash-strapped nation's award creditors to pin down shares in Citgo Petroleum Corp.

  • August 15, 2018

    WTO Dispute Roundup: Aircraft, Food Fights Trudge Along

    In Law360's look at Wednesday's special session of the World Trade Organization Dispute Settlement Body, the long-running aircraft fight between the U.S. and European Union prepares to enter a new phase and the U.S. gears up to retaliate against Indonesia in a fight over food barriers.

  • August 15, 2018

    Insurer Ordered To Pay Costs In UAE Arbitration Award Fight

    A London judge ordered specialty insurer Beazley Furlonge Ltd. to pay £115,000 ($146,000) in costs on Wednesday after a trial of preliminary issues in its legal fight with two United Arab Emirates companies and a group of insurers over who is liable to cover two unpaid arbitration awards worth around $16.7 million.

  • August 14, 2018

    How One Firm Moved The Needle On Disability Inclusion

    This global law firm has recently focused on creating opportunities for people with disabilities across its ranks, and its efforts are already showing results.

  • August 14, 2018

    Italian Engineering Co. Must Arbitrate Power Plant Row

    A New Jersey federal judge ordered an Italian engineering contractor to arbitrate its defamation lawsuit against a U.S. manufacturer of steam condensers, rejecting arguments that the dispute stemming from a power plant project fell outside an underlying arbitration clause.

  • August 14, 2018

    CFIUS Reform Is No Death Knell For Chinese Buyers

    A newly signed law overhauling the Committee on Foreign Investment in the United States has sparked concern in China, but concerns that the country would face tougher reviews than it has in the past are likely unfounded.

  • August 14, 2018

    Bolivia Hit With Arbitration Bid Over Pension Fund Transfer

    The multinational Spanish banking group Banco Bilbao Vizcaya Argentaria SA has initiated arbitration against Bolivia as the country looks to shift the management of public pension funds from a BBVA unit back to the government, saying they've been unable to come to an agreement on compensation.

  • August 14, 2018

    Miami's Suit Over Marlins Sale Heads Back To State Court

    A Florida federal judge has agreed with Miami-Dade County and the city of Miami that their suit against the Miami Marlins belongs in state court, ruling Tuesday that the dispute over the team’s $1.2 billion sale was removed to federal court prematurely.

  • August 14, 2018

    Trump's WTO Appeals Blockade Slowing Progress In Geneva

    The Trump administration's blocking of new appointments to the World Trade Organization's Appellate Body has continued to create headaches in Geneva, as an appeals panel weighing a dispute between Japan and South Korea has postponed its decision indefinitely, according to a WTO document published Tuesday.

  • August 14, 2018

    Sheppard Mullin Nabs Fried Frank Int'l Arbitration Pro In DC

    Sheppard Mullin Richter & Hampton LLP said Monday that it has added a former Fried Frank Harris Shriver & Jacobson LLP attorney in Washington, D.C., bolstering its offerings in the international arbitration arena with his focus on representing clients in industries such as aerospace, government contracts, telecommunications, and oil and gas.

  • August 13, 2018

    David Boies On How Dyslexia Shaped His Practice

    One of the country’s highest-profile litigators, the Boies Schiller Flexner LLP chairman was diagnosed with dyslexia when he was in his 30s. In an interview with Law360, he talks about practicing law with the learning disability.

  • August 13, 2018

    BigLaw’s Mental Health Stigma Shows Signs Of Fading

    Sometimes viewed as an “invisible” disability, mental illness has long been forced under wraps because of the risk attorneys could face bias and stigma. Here’s how lawyers, law firms and other groups are starting to take on the status quo.

  • August 13, 2018

    Trusts Needn't Arbitrate $4.2M Contract Row: Aussie Court

    An Australian judge on Friday refused to force two family trusts to arbitrate their suit with a software company over an allegedly breached $4.2 million share sale agreement, rejecting arguments that a clause calling for disputes to go before a mediator at the Singapore International Arbitration Centre was an arbitration clause.

  • August 13, 2018

    CFIUS Overhaul Signed Into Law Along With Defense Budget

    President Donald Trump signed the National Defense Authorization Act for 2019 into law on Monday, approving the federal defense budget and policy priorities for the upcoming year as well as the attached plan to overhaul the Committee on Foreign Investment in the United States.

  • August 13, 2018

    Dutch Telecom Says $36M Contract Row Must Be Arbitrated

    An approximately $36 million lawsuit accusing the Dutch telecom Veon Ltd. of fraud in connection with an underlying contract with California-based SteppeChange LLC to help modernize Veon's business practices belongs before a U.K. arbitrator, Veon told a California federal court Friday.

  • August 13, 2018

    Electronics Co. Says $1.4M Supply Row Belongs In Court

    A Hong Kong manufacturer of wireless audio system, mobile app and "internet of things" solutions has urged a California federal court not to force it to arbitrate its $1.4 million dispute stemming from a supply agreement with a Nevada-based electronics supplier, saying the parties' agreements call for settling disputes in district court. 

  • August 13, 2018

    Ross Insists Turkish Metals Tariff Hike Is For Security

    Following President Donald Trump’s surprising decision to double tariffs on Turkey’s steel and aluminum exports in response to a tumbling of its currency, U.S. Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross late Friday stressed that the move was made purely for national security reasons.

  • August 10, 2018

    How The Legal Industry Lets Down Lawyers With Disabilities

    The dissolution of a five-year-old bar group marks the latest setback for disabled attorneys, who often find little support while navigating an inhospitable industry.

  • August 10, 2018

    Gaining Access: Disabled Lawyers Share Their Stories

    In a series of interviews, lawyers tell Law360 how even well-intentioned professors can create barriers, how inclusivity can help a firm’s litigation prowess, and how “inspirational” can be a dirty word.

  • August 10, 2018

    UK Litigation Roundup: Here's What You Missed In London

    The last week has seen the Financial Conduct Authority take on a financial consulting firm, engineering company Doosan Babcock sue insurer Acasta, and a new action from private equity-linked firms that have already brought multiple actions worldwide after KPN Group acquired a Thai wind energy company. Here, Law360 looks at those and other new claims in the U.K.

Expert Analysis

  • Energy Firms Face NAFTA Investor-State Dispute Revamp

    Rachael Kent

    The North American Free Trade Agreement's Investor-State Dispute Settlement provision has helped the U.S. domestic energy industry protect its cross-border investments. But the Trump administration has indicated a desire to eliminate the ISDS provision. Energy firms must stay aware of the dynamics of NAFTA renegotiation — and consider how a post-ISDS world would affect their business, say attorneys with WilmerHale.

  • A Proposed Approach For High Court In Vitamin C Case

    Michael Kimberly

    It is safe to expect a narrow ruling from the U.S. Supreme Court in Animal Science v. Hebei, instructing lower courts not to give conclusive deference to foreign sovereigns’ legal submissions. But it would be more sensible to instruct U.S. courts to assess whether these submissions are entitled to any deference in their country of origin and, if so, to give them that deference, say Michael Kimberly and Matthew Waring of Mayer Brown LLP.

  • Opinion

    Why Won't Judicial Nominees Affirm Brown V. Board Of Ed?

    Franita Tolson

    On May 17, 1954, the U.S. Supreme Court decided Brown v. Board of Education, recognizing a moral and legal truth that should be beyond question in American society. The refusal by some of President Donald Trump's judicial nominees to say whether they believe the case was decided correctly is indicative of the narrow-minded elitism they would bring to the bench, says professor Franita Tolson of the University of Southern California's Gould School of Law.

  • The Lawyers' Guide To Cloud Computing

    Daniel Garrie

    In deciding whether cloud computing is right for the organization or firm, an attorney must consider cloud computing’s significant impact on the electronic discovery process, say Daniel Garrie, managing partner at Law & Forensics LLC, and David Cass, chief information security officer at IBM Cloud.

  • Opinion

    Recovering Lawyers' Lost Position Of Independence

    Samuel Samaro

    In these politically divisive times, many ask whether our institutions and traditions can help us return to a greater consensus. In days long past, the legal profession could have been counted on to serve just such a function. But lawyers are now just as polarized as everyone else, says Samuel Samaro of Pashman Stein Walder Hayden PC.

  • 8 Reasons To Take A Fresh Look At Your Law Office Lease

    Tiffany Winne

    After moving into a new law office, tenants often file their signed leases away, figuring that the terms are set for a few years at least. However, leases can be very flexible instruments, and should be reviewed annually even if nothing seems amiss, says Tiffany Winne of Savills Studley Inc.

  • A General Counsel's Tips For Succeeding As A New Associate

    Jason Idilbi

    Based on his experience as a BigLaw associate for six years and now as general counsel for a tech startup, Jason Idilbi of Passport Labs offers some best practices for newer associates — whether they are serving external clients or senior attorneys within their firms.

  • Series

    Judging A Book: Berzon Reviews 'We The Corporations'

    Judge Marsha Berzon

    My advice to prospective clerks will now include the suggestion that they read Adam Winkler's new book, "We the Corporations: How American Businesses Won Their Civil Rights," for the same reason I recommend taking a corporations course — appreciating the critical role of business corporations in American life and law, says Ninth Circuit Judge Marsha Berzon.

  • What ABA’s Position On Harassment Means For Employers

    Minjae Song

    In the #MeToo era, the American Bar Association’s recently passed Resolution 302 is a reminder of harassment policy best practices to all employers, and it should be of particular interest to employers in the legal industry, say attorneys with Hunton Andrews Kurth LLP.

  • Practical Considerations For Litigating Proportionality

    Elizabeth McGinn

    By incorporating an explicit requirement that discovery must be “proportional to the needs of the case,” the 2015 amendments to the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure garnered much speculation as to their impact on courts’ decision-making processes. Now that the rules have been implemented for over two years, several themes have emerged, say attorneys with Buckley Sandler LLP.